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Re: Gandhabba, Gandharva (Onomatopoeia)

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  • alexgenaud
    Dear Nich, You are correct to assume that I am most familiar with European languages. However, my comment regarding ma = mother was encouraged based on
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 27, 2005
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      Dear Nich,

      You are correct to assume that I am most familiar with European
      languages. However, my comment regarding "ma" = "mother" was
      encouraged based on Chinese (which is most definitely MAA - 妈 嬷) and
      Thai (MAE - แม).

      If I am not mistaken, in Japan, it is quite common for a child to
      refer to his mother with "mama". Whether this is an English loan word
      or borrowed (directly) from Chinese, or elsewhere, I can not say.

      I doubt any child's first word is "mother" or "okassan", but rather a
      single syllable (perhaps ka or bo), and I suspect it is nearly always
      "ma". Whether this sheds any light on the further development of
      language seems not to be explored. The word "MA" might be unique in
      that is a very easy sound, perhaps only a subtle vocalization of
      lip-smacking-me-wants-mama's-milk.

      I wonder if the Japanese "Mizu" is derived from the Chinese "Mazu",
      the Goddess of the Sea.

      Cheers,
      Alex

      > Try Japanese:
      > Mother -- Okaasan or Haha
      > Father --Otoosan or Chichi
      > Water--Mizu
      >
      > I'd guess you're only familiar with
      > languages in the Indo-European family.
      > Japanese is incredibly rich in onomatapaea
      > but with a very different feel.
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