Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

sutta networking

Expand Messages
  • Bhante Sujato
    Hello to all who have contributed to this dialogue, I m in Singapore, and managed to get onto a computer before heading to India tomorrow. Thanks once more, it
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 4, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello to all who have contributed to this dialogue,

      I'm in Singapore, and managed to get onto a computer before heading
      to India tomorrow.

      Thanks once more, it seems some interesting ideas are emerging, which
      is exactly what i was after. Most of the detailed info on ways of
      linking 'records' etc., is over my head, but i can see that the
      questions raised are exactly the right ones. We must avoid doing
      something that will be superseded by the next generation technology;
      also we must do something that makes the bulk and complexity of the
      scriptures manageable by software tools like search engines.

      Perhaps we might start by taking a relatively manageable group of
      texts, say the Digha Nikaya, working out a way of indexing and
      referencing that, and put it on the web as a trial version so we can
      get feedback.

      There has been an offer of funds for this project, so we might be
      able to support a part- or full-time worker; obviously we would be
      looking for someone with both the Buddhist and the computer skills.

      in Dhamma

      Bhante Sujato
    • rett
      ... I ve been wondering whether it would be a good idea to use the Harvard-Kyoto system for storing the basic text. It looks a bit funny but is universal,
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 4, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        > We must avoid doing
        >something that will be superseded by the next generation technology;
        >also we must do something that makes the bulk and complexity of the
        >scriptures manageable by software tools like search engines.

        I've been wondering whether it would be a good idea to use the
        Harvard-Kyoto system for storing the basic text. It looks a bit funny
        but is universal, since it doesn't require any 'strange' characters.
        Such a text is very easy to to do searches in, though it requires
        that the search engine be case-sensitive (upper and lower case). From
        there, viewing/writing programs could present the text using any
        alphabet, and any encoding system that comes along in the future.

        best regards,

        /Rett
      • rett
        Dear list members, Speaking of doing computer searches in the corpus of Pali texts, can anyone trace: maa majjhe bha`ngo ahosi (mA majjhe bhaGgo ahosi)
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 4, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          Dear list members,

          Speaking of doing computer searches in the corpus of Pali texts, can
          anyone trace:

          "maa majjhe bha`ngo ahosi" (mA majjhe bhaGgo ahosi) and/or "maa te
          bhavant' antaraayaa" (mA te bhavantantarAyA) ?

          They ought to be in the tipi.taka somewhere, since both are cited by
          Aggava.msa as examples of canonical, as opposed to commentarial,
          usage. (sutta 890, suttamaalaa)

          I'm guessing the former is a way of requesting not to be interrupted... ???

          Any help would be greatly appreciated.

          best regards,

          /Rett
        • Piya Tan
          Rett, The second line is from a common closing benediction often chanted by Sinhalese monks: sabbiitiyo vivajjantu sabba,rogo vinassatu maa te
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 4, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            Rett,

            The second line is from a common closing benediction often chanted by Sinhalese
            monks:

            sabbiitiyo vivajjantu sabba,rogo vinassatu
            maa te bhavatv-antaraayo sukhii diighaayuko bhava...

            May all calamities be averted.
            May all sickness be destroyed.
            May no danger befall you, may you live long happily...

            This was probably a late Sinhalese composition.

            Sukhi

            Piya

            rett wrote:

            > Dear list members,
            >
            > Speaking of doing computer searches in the corpus of Pali texts, can
            > anyone trace:
            >
            > "maa majjhe bha`ngo ahosi" (mA majjhe bhaGgo ahosi) and/or "maa te
            > bhavant' antaraayaa" (mA te bhavantantarAyA) ?
            >
            > They ought to be in the tipi.taka somewhere, since both are cited by
            > Aggava.msa as examples of canonical, as opposed to commentarial,
            > usage. (sutta 890, suttamaalaa)
            >
            > I'm guessing the former is a way of requesting not to be interrupted... ???
            >
            > Any help would be greatly appreciated.
            >
            > best regards,
            >
            > /Rett
            >
            >
            > - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
            > [Homepage] http://www.tipitaka.net
            > [Send Message] pali@yahoogroups.com
            > Paaliga.na - a community for Pali students
            > Yahoo! Groups members can set their delivery options to daily digest or web only.
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • Jim Anderson
            Hi Rett, I didn t recognize them but fortunately my computer did. maa majjhe bha`ngo ahosi occurs at Vin I 45, 51, 61; II 223, 228, 231 Horner translates the
            Message 5 of 8 , Dec 4, 2004
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi Rett,

              I didn't recognize them but fortunately my computer did.

              "maa majjhe bha`ngo ahosi" occurs at Vin I 45, 51, 61; II 223, 228,
              231 Horner translates the one for Vin I 45 as: "Mind there be no
              crease in the middle." (of the robe) p.61.

              "maa te bhavant' antaraayaa" is "maa te bhavantvantaraayo" (bhavantv-
              = bhavantu) at Bv 20 (verse 179) but the Burmese reading
              has -antaraayaa. Horner translates this phrase as "may there be no
              stumbling-block for you" p.24 (verse 180).

              Best wishes,
              Jim

              > Dear list members,
              >
              > Speaking of doing computer searches in the corpus of Pali texts, can
              > anyone trace:
              >
              > "maa majjhe bha`ngo ahosi" (mA majjhe bhaGgo ahosi) and/or "maa te
              > bhavant' antaraayaa" (mA te bhavantantarAyA) ?
              >
              > They ought to be in the tipi.taka somewhere, since both are cited by
              > Aggava.msa as examples of canonical, as opposed to commentarial,
              > usage. (sutta 890, suttamaalaa)
              >
              > I'm guessing the former is a way of requesting not to be
              interrupted... ???
              >
              > Any help would be greatly appreciated.
              >
              > best regards,
              >
              > /Rett
            • rett
              You guys are amazing. Thank you Piya and Jim :-)
              Message 6 of 8 , Dec 4, 2004
              • 0 Attachment
                You guys are amazing. Thank you Piya and Jim :-)
              • Gunnar Gällmo
                ... In The Mirror of the Dhamma , and some other popular collections of devotional texts, this stanza is included in a poem called Mahaa Jayama ngala
                Message 7 of 8 , Dec 5, 2004
                • 0 Attachment
                  --- Piya Tan <libris@...> skrev:

                  > The second line is from a common closing benediction
                  > often chanted by Sinhalese
                  > monks:
                  >
                  > sabbiitiyo vivajjantu sabba,rogo vinassatu
                  > maa te bhavatv-antaraayo sukhii diighaayuko bhava...
                  >
                  > May all calamities be averted.
                  > May all sickness be destroyed.
                  > May no danger befall you, may you live long
                  > happily...

                  In "The Mirror of the Dhamma", and some other popular
                  collections of devotional texts, this stanza is
                  included in a poem called "Mahaa Jayama"ngala
                  Gaathaa", which I have never heard recited in its
                  entirety (18 stanzas; this one is nr 12, thus not the
                  closing one); I have, however, heard all the different
                  stanzas being recited separately.

                  (I have never heard the monks reciting "diighaayukaa"
                  instead of "diighaayuko" even when chanting for a
                  woman...)

                  Gunnar


                  =====
                  gunnargallmo@...
                • Piya Tan
                  Gunnar, Apparently, the -o ending, although technically masculine, is taking as a sort of universal gender . Unless perhaps the chanting is specially chanted
                  Message 8 of 8 , Dec 5, 2004
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Gunnar,

                    Apparently, the -o ending, although technically masculine, is taking as a sort of
                    "universal gender". Unless perhaps the chanting is specially chanted for a woman
                    devotee (birthday, anniversary etc) as is often done in Thailand.

                    Piya

                    Gunnar Gällmo wrote:

                    > --- Piya Tan <libris@...> skrev:
                    >
                    > > The second line is from a common closing benediction
                    > > often chanted by Sinhalese
                    > > monks:
                    > >
                    > > sabbiitiyo vivajjantu sabba,rogo vinassatu
                    > > maa te bhavatv-antaraayo sukhii diighaayuko bhava...
                    > >
                    > > May all calamities be averted.
                    > > May all sickness be destroyed.
                    > > May no danger befall you, may you live long
                    > > happily...
                    >
                    > In "The Mirror of the Dhamma", and some other popular
                    > collections of devotional texts, this stanza is
                    > included in a poem called "Mahaa Jayama"ngala
                    > Gaathaa", which I have never heard recited in its
                    > entirety (18 stanzas; this one is nr 12, thus not the
                    > closing one); I have, however, heard all the different
                    > stanzas being recited separately.
                    >
                    > (I have never heard the monks reciting "diighaayukaa"
                    > instead of "diighaayuko" even when chanting for a
                    > woman...)
                    >
                    > Gunnar
                    >
                    > =====
                    > gunnargallmo@...
                    >
                    >
                    > - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                    > [Homepage] http://www.tipitaka.net
                    > [Send Message] pali@yahoogroups.com
                    > Paaliga.na - a community for Pali students
                    > Yahoo! Groups members can set their delivery options to daily digest or web only.
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.