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Addiction to Disputation

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  • Jeffrey Brooks
    Addiction to Disputation While leading a local sutta study class I was recently reminded that the first sutta in the Digha Nikaya, the Brahmajala Sutta, deals
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 4 11:52 AM
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      Addiction to Disputation

      While leading a local sutta study class I was recently
      reminded that the first sutta in the Digha Nikaya, the
      Brahmajala Sutta, deals with "What the Teaching is
      not." And, one of the things that the Buddha's
      teaching is not is addiction to disputation.

      Kindest regards,

      Jeff Brooks

      Bell Springs 100 Day Summer Rains Retreat
      May 27 - Sept. 7, 2004
      http://www.bellsprings.org

      ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ
      "What the Teaching is not"
      Brahmajala Sutta, DN 1.1.18
      "Whereas some ascetics and Brahmin remain addicted to
      disputation such as: 'You do not understand this
      doctrine and discipline -- I do! 'How could you
      understand this doctrine and discipline?' 'Your way is
      all wrong -- mine is right! 'I am consistent -- you
      are not!' 'You said last what you should have said
      first, and you said first what you should have said
      last!' 'What you took so long to think up has been
      refuted!' 'You argument has been over thrown, you are
      defeated!' 'Go on save your doctrine -- get out of
      that if you can!' the ascetic Gotama refrains from
      such disputation."

      "This, monks, the Tathagata understands: These view
      points thus grasped and adhered to will lead to
      such-and-such destinations in another world. This the
      Tathagata knows, and more, but he is not attached to
      that knowledge. And being thus unattached he has
      experienced for himself perfect peace, and having
      truly understood the arising and passing away of
      (sensations), their attraction and peril and the
      deliverance from them, the Tathagata is liberated
      without remainder."

      And what are these matters? (he enumerates 62 belief
      systems, opinions and concepts).

      1.37
      "There are, monks, other matters, profound, hard to
      see, hard to understand, peaceful, excellent, beyond
      mere thought, subtle, to be experienced by the wise,
      which the Tathagata, having realized them by his own
      super-knowledge (abinna), proclaims, and about which
      those who would truthfully praise the Tathagata would
      rightly speak."

      3.71
      "With regard too all of these..., they experience
      these (sensations) by repeated contact through the six
      sense bases; (sensation) conditions craving, craving
      conditions clinging; clinging conditions becoming;
      becoming conditions birth; birth conditions aging and
      death, sorrow, lamentation, sadness and
      {(dissatisfaction) dukkha}.
      "When a monk understands as they really are
      (vipassana) the arising and passing away of the six
      bases of contact, there attraction and peril, and the
      deliverance from them, he knows that which goes beyond
      all of these views.
      (Digha Nikaya trans. Maurice Walshe, Wisdom, 1987)

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    • Bill
      ... Hi Jeff, That s a good point to bring up. I have noticed that Westerners in particular seem to be quite addicted to disputation. We wallow in it, drink it
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 6, 2004
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        --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, Jeffrey Brooks <jhanananda@y...> wrote:
        > Addiction to Disputation
        >
        > While leading a local sutta study class I was recently
        > reminded that the first sutta in the Digha Nikaya, the
        > Brahmajala Sutta, deals with "What the Teaching is
        > not." And, one of the things that the Buddha's
        > teaching is not is addiction to disputation.
        >

        Hi Jeff,

        That's a good point to bring up. I have noticed that Westerners in
        particular seem to be quite addicted to disputation. We wallow in it,
        drink it up, and bathe in it, all in the name of satisfying our
        'intellect'.

        It maybe a 'symptom' of the way we are educated. But, as far as I can
        tell, this addiction just seems to be more of Mara's materialistic
        bait.

        Before anybody gets excited, I am a Westerner also and have had
        problems with this addiction in the past. But I have seem to have
        unshackled myself from it as of late, as I am more inclined to
        meditation and solitude these days. And I have come to realize that
        all the debate, dispute and talk does nothing but leave me tired,
        distracted and agitated for the most part.

        May you all be happy and achieve the highest bliss,
        Bill
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