Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

books for learning Pali

Expand Messages
  • John Kelly
    Dear Susan and Charles and others new to this group learning Pali, I recommend the following 3 books (in the order below): 1. Start with the Pali Primer by
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 4, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      Dear Susan and Charles and others new to this group
      learning Pali,

      I recommend the following 3 books (in the order
      below):

      1. Start with the Pali Primer by Lily de Silva. This
      is a very accessible introduction to the language, and
      provides lots of exercise sentences for translating
      Pali to English and also English to Pali. It's
      limitation is that it does not use examples from the
      suttas in its exercises and it's presentation of
      material in the later chapters lacks a little depth.
      A big plus, of course, is that Yong Peng is
      systematically leading us through this, and the
      chapters you have missed are all on the web. And the
      book is available for free download , as has already
      been noted.

      2. "The New Course in Reading Pali" by Gair and
      Karunatillake is an excellent book too, but I wouldn't
      recommend it first off for someone with
      no Pali experience at all. I have worked through
      it entirely and found that having completed the Pali
      Primer beforehand helped a lot. All the exercise
      material is directly taken from the suttas, which is a
      very good feature. My own answers for the exercises
      have been posted to the list, and are maintained on
      Yong Peng's web-site.

      3. "Introduction to Pali" by A. K. Warder covers all
      the basics in a very thorough way. The exercise
      material is also right from the canon, and very useful
      in that respect. As with the Gair, I am sending my
      answers to this list for people to follow along as
      they wish - and provide feedback and suggestions for
      improvement.

      All these books are easy to find from online
      bookstores - pariyatti.com is an excellent resource in
      the US for Theravadan Buddhist material.

      May you all be well, and may all of our Pali
      endeavours thrive!

      John
    • hjgrossi
      I haven t been checking the group as often as I have been so I may be repeating what s been already said. John s comments on the basic Pali textbooks are right
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 4, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        I haven't been checking the group as often as I have been so I may be repeating
        what's been already said.

        John's comments on the basic Pali textbooks are right on. He and I have been working
        on Pali for a couple years, progressing through these three books in the order he
        gives. In addition, I'd recommend getting the Venerable Bhuddadatta's "Concise Pali-
        English Dictionary." While the entries under each word are far less extensive than in
        other dictionaries, this one is the most user-friendly, especially for novices. I find that
        I refer to it before the the vocabularies in the textbooks or the PTS dictionaries.

        A book that is not so useful is "A Pali-English Glossary," form Sri Satguru Publications.
        I ordered this after seeing it listed among Pali language books in an Indian vendors
        catalog. It looks to be a computer-generated word list, with only one definition per
        word and no indication of part of speech, gender, etc. I remember that one thing that
        caught my eye was it's price, which was far less than one would expect a dictionary to
        be.

        Henry
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.