Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: conclusion pariyaada research

Expand Messages
  • Ong Yong Peng
    Dear Nina, Jim, Piya and friends, many thanks to Nina for conduct the research on pariyaada. I now see that na applies to both pariyaadaaya and .thassanti. I
    Message 1 of 24 , Jul 2, 2003
      Dear Nina, Jim, Piya and friends,

      many thanks to Nina for conduct the research on pariyaada. I now see
      that na applies to both pariyaadaaya and .thassanti. I hope that the
      Tipitaka is consistent in this grammatical usage.

      Nina, do you think it is better to translate (as I pick up from one
      of the sentences you quoted) "citta.m na pariyaadaaya .thassanti"
      as "will not persistently overwhelm the mind"? I think this will
      leave no room for second thought as to what the passage means.

      metta,
      Yong Peng

      >uppannaa manaapaamanaapaa phassaa citta.m na pariyaadaaya .thassanti
      >agreeable and disagreeable impressions that have arisen, will not
      overwhelm the mind and persist.
    • nina van gorkom
      Dear Yong Peng, op 02-07-2003 14:45 schreef Ong Yong Peng op ypong001@yahoo.com: I now see ... N: Yes, it is a good solution. Jim had one remark about
      Message 2 of 24 , Jul 2, 2003
        Dear Yong Peng,
        op 02-07-2003 14:45 schreef Ong Yong Peng op ypong001@...:

        I now see
        > that na applies to both pariyaadaaya and .thassanti. I hope that the
        > Tipitaka is consistent in this grammatical usage.
        >
        > Nina, do you think it is better to translate (as I pick up from one
        > of the sentences you quoted) "citta.m na pariyaadaaya .thassanti"
        > as "will not persistently overwhelm the mind"? I think this will
        > leave no room for second thought as to what the passage means.
        >> uppannaa manaapaamanaapaa phassaa citta.m na pariyaadaaya .thassanti
        >> agreeable and disagreeable impressions that have arisen, will not
        > overwhelm the mind and persist.
        N: Yes, it is a good solution. Jim had one remark about bhavayato:
        impressions that have arisen in you while applying yourself...
        We can consider this, have to figure out the whole sentence.
        Nina.
      • Ong Yong Peng
        Dear Nina, Jim and friends, I have now put the latest paragraph of the sutta online: http://www.tipitaka.net/tipitaka/strans/stransload.php?page=mn062s07 I
        Message 3 of 24 , Jul 6, 2003
          Dear Nina, Jim and friends,

          I have now put the latest paragraph of the sutta online:
          http://www.tipitaka.net/tipitaka/strans/stransload.php?page=mn062s07

          I have also reworked all the pages in this section, such that
          1. there is better presentation;
          2. the downloading time is reduced.

          Below is the latest compilation on the word bhaavayato. Please
          correct me if there is any mistake.

          bhaavayato [referring to A Practical Grammar of the Pali Language by
          Charles Duroiselle]
          ROOT: bhuu, to be.
          Chapter 10
          (§492) causative: bhaave, bhaavaya.
          (§496) causative base/stem: bhaaveti.
          (§441) present participle: bhaaventa, bhaavaya.m, bhaavayanta,
          bhaavayamaana.
          --> Choose 'bhaavaya.m'.
          Warder's Lesson 21 (Page 169)
          Declension of present participles in -ant: bhaavaya.m ==> bhaavayato
          (dat./sing.)
          [ The following is based on messages from Jim Anderson and Nina van
          Gorkom. ]
          Bhaavayato is a present participle derived from a causative stem --
          bhaaveti. There are several variants of the present participle:
          bhaaventa, bhaavaya.m, bhaavayanta, bhaavayamaana. In this sutta,
          bhaavaya.m is used. The final word bhaavayato can be in either dative
          or genitive case. In the context of this sentence, the dative case is
          implied.

          metta,
          Yong Peng
        • Jim Anderson
          Dear Yong Peng, I appreciate your nicely put presentation here. I m pointing out a couple of mistakes.
          Message 4 of 24 , Jul 6, 2003
            Dear Yong Peng,

            I appreciate your nicely put presentation here. I'm pointing out a
            couple of mistakes.

            << Below is the latest compilation on the word bhaavayato. Please
            correct me if there is any mistake.

            bhaavayato [referring to A Practical Grammar of the Pali Language by
            Charles Duroiselle]
            ROOT: bhuu, to be.
            Chapter 10
            (§492) causative: bhaave, bhaavaya.
            (§496) causative base/stem: bhaaveti.>>

            I'd say that the causative base/stem is as §492: bhaave, bhaavaya
            which are derived from bhuu + .ne or .naya (the .n is an indicatory
            letter indicating that the root vowel, where applicable, is
            lengthened). Bhaaveti is a causative verb, 3rd pers. sing. active
            present tense.

            <<(§441) present participle: bhaaventa, bhaavaya.m, bhaavayanta,
            bhaavayamaana.
            --> Choose 'bhaavaya.m'.>>

            In terms of present participle stems, I'd leave out 'bhaavaya.m' as it
            is an inflected word in the nom. sing. and choose instead
            'bhaavayanta' from bhaavaya + nta.

            <<Warder's Lesson 21 (Page 169)
            Declension of present participles in -ant: bhaavaya.m ==> bhaavayato
            (dat./sing.)
            [ The following is based on messages from Jim Anderson and Nina van
            Gorkom. ]
            Bhaavayato is a present participle derived from a causative stem --
            bhaaveti.>>

            Use causative stem 'bhaavaya' instead of 'bhaaveti'. The causative
            present participle stem is 'bhaavayanta'.

            << There are several variants of the present participle:
            bhaaventa, bhaavaya.m, bhaavayanta, bhaavayamaana. In this sutta,
            bhaavaya.m is used. The final word bhaavayato can be in either dative
            or genitive case. In the context of this sentence, the dative case is
            implied.>>

            Leave out 'bhaavaya.m'.

            Best wishes,
            Jim
          • Ong Yong Peng
            Dear Jim and friends, thanks for pointing out the mistakes, I have made the corrections and updated the page:
            Message 5 of 24 , Jul 6, 2003
              Dear Jim and friends,

              thanks for pointing out the mistakes, I have made the corrections and
              updated the page:
              http://www.tipitaka.net/tipitaka/strans/stransload.php?page=mn062s07

              --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, "Jim Anderson" <jimanderson_on@y...>
              wrote:
              > Dear Yong Peng,
              >
              > I appreciate your nicely put presentation here. I'm pointing out a
              > couple of mistakes.
              >
              > << Below is the latest compilation on the word bhaavayato. Please
              > correct me if there is any mistake.
              >
              > bhaavayato [referring to A Practical Grammar of the Pali Language by
              > Charles Duroiselle]
              > ROOT: bhuu, to be.
              > Chapter 10
              > (§492) causative: bhaave, bhaavaya.
              > (§496) causative base/stem: bhaaveti.>>
              >
              > I'd say that the causative base/stem is as §492: bhaave, bhaavaya
              > which are derived from bhuu + .ne or .naya (the .n is an indicatory
              > letter indicating that the root vowel, where applicable, is
              > lengthened). Bhaaveti is a causative verb, 3rd pers. sing. active
              > present tense.
              >
              > <<(§441) present participle: bhaaventa, bhaavaya.m, bhaavayanta,
              > bhaavayamaana.
              > --> Choose 'bhaavaya.m'.>>
              >
              > In terms of present participle stems, I'd leave out 'bhaavaya.m' as
              it
              > is an inflected word in the nom. sing. and choose instead
              > 'bhaavayanta' from bhaavaya + nta.
              >
              > <<Warder's Lesson 21 (Page 169)
              > Declension of present participles in -ant: bhaavaya.m ==> bhaavayato
              > (dat./sing.)
              > [ The following is based on messages from Jim Anderson and Nina van
              > Gorkom. ]
              > Bhaavayato is a present participle derived from a causative stem --
              > bhaaveti.>>
              >
              > Use causative stem 'bhaavaya' instead of 'bhaaveti'. The causative
              > present participle stem is 'bhaavayanta'.
              >
              > << There are several variants of the present participle:
              > bhaaventa, bhaavaya.m, bhaavayanta, bhaavayamaana. In this sutta,
              > bhaavaya.m is used. The final word bhaavayato can be in either
              dative
              > or genitive case. In the context of this sentence, the dative case
              is
              > implied.>>
              >
              > Leave out 'bhaavaya.m'.
              >
              > Best wishes,
              > Jim
            • Ong Yong Peng
              Dear Jim and friends, thanks for pointing out the mistakes, I have made the corrections and updated the page:
              Message 6 of 24 , Jul 6, 2003
                Dear Jim and friends,

                thanks for pointing out the mistakes, I have made the corrections and
                updated the page:
                http://www.tipitaka.net/tipitaka/strans/stransload.php?page=mn062s07

                --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, "Jim Anderson" <jimanderson_on@y...>
                wrote:
                > Dear Yong Peng,
                >
                > I appreciate your nicely put presentation here. I'm pointing out a
                > couple of mistakes.
                >
                > << Below is the latest compilation on the word bhaavayato. Please
                > correct me if there is any mistake.
                >
                > bhaavayato [referring to A Practical Grammar of the Pali Language by
                > Charles Duroiselle]
                > ROOT: bhuu, to be.
                > Chapter 10
                > (§492) causative: bhaave, bhaavaya.
                > (§496) causative base/stem: bhaaveti.>>
                >
                > I'd say that the causative base/stem is as §492: bhaave, bhaavaya
                > which are derived from bhuu + .ne or .naya (the .n is an indicatory
                > letter indicating that the root vowel, where applicable, is
                > lengthened). Bhaaveti is a causative verb, 3rd pers. sing. active
                > present tense.
                >
                > <<(§441) present participle: bhaaventa, bhaavaya.m, bhaavayanta,
                > bhaavayamaana.
                > --> Choose 'bhaavaya.m'.>>
                >
                > In terms of present participle stems, I'd leave out 'bhaavaya.m' as
                it
                > is an inflected word in the nom. sing. and choose instead
                > 'bhaavayanta' from bhaavaya + nta.
                >
                > <<Warder's Lesson 21 (Page 169)
                > Declension of present participles in -ant: bhaavaya.m ==> bhaavayato
                > (dat./sing.)
                > [ The following is based on messages from Jim Anderson and Nina van
                > Gorkom. ]
                > Bhaavayato is a present participle derived from a causative stem --
                > bhaaveti.>>
                >
                > Use causative stem 'bhaavaya' instead of 'bhaaveti'. The causative
                > present participle stem is 'bhaavayanta'.
                >
                > << There are several variants of the present participle:
                > bhaaventa, bhaavaya.m, bhaavayanta, bhaavayamaana. In this sutta,
                > bhaavaya.m is used. The final word bhaavayato can be in either
                dative
                > or genitive case. In the context of this sentence, the dative case
                is
                > implied.>>
                >
                > Leave out 'bhaavaya.m'.
                >
                > Best wishes,
                > Jim
              • nina van gorkom
                Dear Yong Peng, ... N: Would you like me to translate the next part of the sutta on mind development like water? Whatever you decide is fine. As to the Co: I
                Message 7 of 24 , Jul 8, 2003
                  Dear Yong Peng,
                  op 06-07-2003 12:21 schreef Ong Yong Peng op ypong001@...:

                  > I have now put the latest paragraph of the sutta online:
                  > http://www.tipitaka.net/tipitaka/strans/stransload.php?page=mn062s07
                  N: Would you like me to translate the next part of the sutta on mind
                  development like water?
                  Whatever you decide is fine.
                  As to the Co: I finished the last par to the end, translated line by line as
                  you suggested, but I want to coordinate with you when to present it. Perhaps
                  when the relevant sutta sections are ready I could add co. to each section?
                  Meanwhile, I went back to the beginning of the Co I had not translated
                  before and now translating line by line. At first I found the similes long
                  and difficult, but now I like them very much. Pages with viya..viya.. I have
                  some sections ready and could present them little by little if you like. But
                  again, whatever you decide is fine.
                  Nina.
                • Ong Yong Peng
                  Dear Nina, thanks for your generous words. Would it be ok that I attempt on the next paragraph (water), while you attempt the following one on heat/fire? At
                  Message 8 of 24 , Jul 9, 2003
                    Dear Nina,

                    thanks for your generous words. Would it be ok that I attempt on the
                    next paragraph (water), while you attempt the following one on
                    heat/fire? At this rate, we can probably finish the sutta by November.

                    As for the commentaries, I am glad to hear that you have finished up
                    to the last paragraph, and are going back for a line by line
                    translation. Please do as you see fit. I would like to put the
                    commentary with the sutta on the web, if you don't mind. Thank you.

                    metta,
                    Yong Peng

                    --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, nina van gorkom wrote:
                    > N: Would you like me to translate the next part of the sutta on mind
                    > development like water?
                    > Whatever you decide is fine.
                    > As to the Co: I finished the last par to the end, translated line
                    by line as you suggested, but I want to coordinate with you when to
                    present it. Perhaps when the relevant sutta sections are ready I
                    could add co. to each section?
                    > Meanwhile, I went back to the beginning of the Co I had not
                    translated before and now translating line by line. At first I found
                    the similes long and difficult, but now I like them very much. Pages
                    with viya..viya.. I have some sections ready and could present them
                    little by little if you like. But again, whatever you decide is fine.
                  • nina van gorkom
                    Dear Yong Peng, ... N: Yes, a very good idea. I shall add commentary to the parts of the sutta as we are translating them now. I can send of from now on those
                    Message 9 of 24 , Jul 10, 2003
                      Dear Yong Peng,
                      op 09-07-2003 20:55 schreef Ong Yong Peng op ypong001@...:
                      > thanks for your generous words. Would it be ok that I attempt on the
                      > next paragraph (water), while you attempt the following one on
                      > heat/fire? At this rate, we can probably finish the sutta by November.
                      N: Yes, a very good idea.
                      I shall add commentary to the parts of the sutta as we are translating them
                      now.
                      I can send of from now on those from the very beginning, and these I number
                      B series. As I go along I shall repost the ones at the end I posted already,
                      so that they are all in the right order.
                      Is that O.K.?
                      I shall add word lists, there are many. What is easier for the readers, to
                      put them before my text, or afterwards?
                      Y: I would like to put the
                      > commentary with the sutta on the web, if you don't mind.
                      N: That is a good idea, it is good to have sutta and commentary together.
                      I always like suggestions and corrections, I know how easy it is to make
                      mistakes. I have no tools for word search, nor access to the old grammars.
                      It is good if it can be teamwork.
                      Nina.
                    • Ong Yong Peng
                      Dear Nina and friends, thanks, Nina. Please allow me some time, and I shall present what I have on Sunday. Your suggestion for the commentary is perfect.
                      Message 10 of 24 , Jul 11, 2003
                        Dear Nina and friends,

                        thanks, Nina. Please allow me some time, and I shall present what I
                        have on Sunday.

                        Your suggestion for the commentary is perfect. Please do as you see
                        fit. Word lists are wonderful, especially for Pali students like
                        myself. I think they are generally placed at the end of the text,
                        unless we assume the reader is seeing all these words for the first
                        time.

                        The CSCD (cd-rom) has a built-in search function, the online PED has
                        a good search engine, so do the online BUDSIR. Searching for pali
                        terms using Yahoo!/Google is limited due to the non-standardised Pali
                        fonts used in various sites. For tipitaka.net, I will be converting
                        Ven. Narada's text and Duroiselle's grammar to Unicode once I
                        complete the Pali Primer.

                        As for the old grammars, can you tell me more about them. Besides
                        physically owning a copy, what skills/knowledge are needed to
                        understand them. I believe they are not in the Roman script.

                        metta,
                        Yong Peng

                        --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, nina van gorkom wrote:
                        > > thanks for your generous words. Would it be ok that I attempt on
                        the next paragraph (water), while you attempt the following one on
                        heat/fire? At this rate, we can probably finish the sutta by November.
                        > N: Yes, a very good idea.
                        > I shall add commentary to the parts of the sutta as we are
                        translating them now.
                        > I can send of from now on those from the very beginning, and these
                        I number B series. As I go along I shall repost the ones at the end I
                        posted already, so that they are all in the right order.
                        > Is that O.K.?
                        > I shall add word lists, there are many. What is easier for the
                        readers, to put them before my text, or afterwards?
                        > Y: I would like to put the
                        > > commentary with the sutta on the web, if you don't mind.
                        > N: That is a good idea, it is good to have sutta and commentary
                        together. I always like suggestions and corrections, I know how easy
                        it is to make mistakes. I have no tools for word search, nor access
                        to the old grammars.
                        > It is good if it can be teamwork.
                      • nina van gorkom
                        Dear Yong Peng, op 11-07-2003 17:30 schreef Ong Yong Peng op ypong001@yahoo.com: ... N: Yes, it is with the commentaries different: very many unusual words.
                        Message 11 of 24 , Jul 13, 2003
                          Dear Yong Peng,
                          op 11-07-2003 17:30 schreef Ong Yong Peng op ypong001@...:>
                          > Your suggestion for the commentary is perfect. Please do as you see
                          > fit. Word lists are wonderful, especially for Pali students like
                          > myself. I think they are generally placed at the end of the text,
                          > unless we assume the reader is seeing all these words for the first
                          > time.
                          N: Yes, it is with the commentaries different: very many unusual words. But
                          very interesting. I learn about village life in olden times. People gave
                          expression to their devotion with their decorations, the golden statues and
                          festoonwork moved along by machinery (yanta). I learn about colours, the
                          natural coloring, like coloring from red lead. About putting milk in a
                          conch. About trees I did not know of before, like the coral tree. We should
                          think of the kusala cittas of the people of old who made such elaborate
                          decorations. The Commentary gives very impressive similes about the Buddha
                          and Rahula walking behind as you will see soon. Against the background of
                          all this gold glittering, gold dusting, festoonwork, the similes come to
                          life.
                          You will also see that the Buddha is compared to an elephant, to a lion, a
                          tiger, a swan, and Rahula is compared to the young animal, going behind. The
                          animals used in these similes were considered as majestic, awe-inspiring,
                          and very beautiful. The young animal was also very elegant but only at the
                          beginning of its growth and development.
                          I hope you will appreciate the similes.
                          Y: The CSCD (cd-rom) has a built-in search function, the online PED has
                          > a good search engine, so do the online BUDSIR.
                          N: Budsir is difficult if one does not want to be on line long.
                          But nowadays tipitaka.net works very well for me.

                          Y: As for the old grammars, can you tell me more about them. Besides
                          > physically owning a copy, what skills/knowledge are needed to
                          > understand them.
                          N: I like to listen to the experts. Jim started with Kaccayaana, on his Pali
                          study. About the other grammars, maybe he would post something here? I do
                          not know anything. I only found out that one can easily go wrong without
                          these old grammars. They elaborate in their examples of the use of words. We
                          can find out that there is always more to it than we thought at first.
                          Teng Kee also posted here some info about translations of part Saddaniiti
                          which is in Pali. Do you have this in Pali? Then you could perhaps give some
                          texts from it when you give us the word of the week. Several people together
                          could try to translate the relevant passage.
                          Nina.
                        • Ong Yong Peng
                          Dear Nina and friends, thanks. After reading what you have written, I really look forward to the commentaries. I am interested to learn about the Indian social
                          Message 12 of 24 , Jul 14, 2003
                            Dear Nina and friends,

                            thanks. After reading what you have written, I really look forward to
                            the commentaries. I am interested to learn about the Indian social
                            and cultural aspect of life in Buddha's days. As for the similes,
                            sometimes I find them wordy and dragging, but I'd like to learn to
                            appreciate them.

                            Yes, I'm also follow the thread on Kaccayaana. I do agree that
                            ancient grammars will have something to offer us. Unfortunately, I do
                            not have any of them. But I think it would be a good idea if these
                            grammars can be made available online.

                            Thanks also for your comments to Tipitaka.net. I am currently writing
                            on the Buddha's life and presenting it in an unique way. However,
                            because of the high demand for historical accuracy and research, I
                            may not finished it in the short term. Please have a look and give me
                            your comments:
                            http://www.tipitaka.net/b-cube/pageload.php?page=030701a

                            metta,
                            Yong Peng

                            --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, nina van gorkom wrote:
                            Yes, it is with the commentaries different: very many unusual words.
                            But very interesting. I learn about village life in olden times.
                            People gave expression to their devotion with their decorations, the
                            golden statues and festoonwork moved along by machinery (yanta). I
                            learn about colours, the natural coloring, like coloring from red
                            lead. About putting milk in a conch. About trees I did not know of
                            before, like the coral tree. We should think of the kusala cittas of
                            the people of old who made such elaborate decorations. The Commentary
                            gives very impressive similes about the Buddha and Rahula walking
                            behind as you will see soon. Against the background of all this gold
                            glittering, gold dusting, festoonwork, the similes come to life.

                            You will also see that the Buddha is compared to an elephant, to a
                            lion, a tiger, a swan, and Rahula is compared to the young animal,
                            going behind. The animals used in these similes were considered as
                            majestic, awe-inspiring, and very beautiful. The young animal was
                            also very elegant but only at the beginning of its growth and
                            development.

                            I hope you will appreciate the similes.

                            > Y: As for the old grammars, can you tell me more about them.
                            Besides physically owning a copy, what skills/knowledge are needed to
                            understand them.

                            I like to listen to the experts. Jim started with Kaccayaana, on his
                            Pali study. About the other grammars, maybe he would post something
                            here? I do not know anything. I only found out that one can easily go
                            wrong without these old grammars. They elaborate in their examples of
                            the use of words. We can find out that there is always more to it
                            than we thought at first. Teng Kee also posted here some info about
                            translations of part Saddaniiti which is in Pali. Do you have this in
                            Pali? Then you could perhaps give some texts from it when you give us
                            the word of the week. Several people together could try to translate
                            the relevant passage.
                          • bodhi2500
                            Hi Yong Peng ... writing ... me ... In your life of the Buddha at the above link, you have Siddhatta as the Bodhisatta name, isnt the Pali spelling -
                            Message 13 of 24 , Jul 14, 2003
                              Hi Yong Peng

                              --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, "Ong Yong Peng" <ypong001@y...> wrote:
                              > Thanks also for your comments to Tipitaka.net. I am currently
                              writing
                              > on the Buddha's life and presenting it in an unique way. However,
                              > because of the high demand for historical accuracy and research, I
                              > may not finished it in the short term. Please have a look and give
                              me
                              > your comments:
                              > http://www.tipitaka.net/b-cube/pageload.php?page=030701a
                              >
                              > metta,
                              > Yong Peng

                              In your life of the Buddha at the above link, you have "Siddhatta"
                              as the Bodhisatta name, isnt the Pali spelling - "Siddhattha" ?

                              BTW thank you for all the great work you are doing on this Pali
                              group and the Tipitaka.net site.

                              Take care
                              Steve
                            • Ong Yong Peng
                              Dear Steve and friends, thanks for pointing out the mistake. I have made the correction. Thanks also for your kind words. metta, Yong Peng ... In your life of
                              Message 14 of 24 , Jul 15, 2003
                                Dear Steve and friends,

                                thanks for pointing out the mistake. I have made the correction.
                                Thanks also for your kind words.

                                metta,
                                Yong Peng

                                --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, bodhi2500 wrote:
                                In your life of the Buddha at the above link, you have "Siddhatta" as
                                the Bodhisatta name, isnt the Pali spelling - "Siddhattha" ?
                              • nina van gorkom
                                Dear Yong Peng, You are addressing people coming from many different backgrounds, trying to arouse their interest. It is good that you do this in a manner
                                Message 15 of 24 , Jul 15, 2003
                                  Dear Yong Peng,
                                  You are addressing people coming from many different backgrounds, trying to
                                  arouse their interest. It is good that you do this in a manner easily
                                  understandable to people who hear about the Buddha for the first time. You
                                  did some research on the historical background and the books available in
                                  different cultures. I cannot give comments on this, because I did not make
                                  studies in this field. I see at the end that you are going to write about
                                  Asita which is a beautiful story. We can find this in "Pali Proper Names",
                                  by Malalasekera, PTS. Two huge volumes with info about persons in Tipitaka
                                  and Commentaries.
                                  Nina.
                                  op 14-07-2003 15:41 schreef Ong Yong Peng op ypong001@...:

                                  > I am currently writing
                                  > on the Buddha's life and presenting it in an unique way. However,
                                  > because of the high demand for historical accuracy and research, I
                                  > may not finished it in the short term. Please have a look and give me
                                  > your comments:
                                • Dimitry A. Ivakhnenko (������� ���������
                                  Dear friends, nvg Asita which is a beautiful story. We can find this in Pali Proper Names , nvg by Malalasekera, PTS. Two huge volumes with info about
                                  Message 16 of 24 , Jul 15, 2003
                                    Dear friends,

                                    nvg> Asita which is a beautiful story. We can find this in "Pali Proper Names",
                                    nvg> by Malalasekera, PTS. Two huge volumes with info about persons in Tipitaka
                                    nvg> and Commentaries.

                                    The story about Asita is available at
                                    http://www.palikanon.com/english/pali_names/ay/asita.htm
                                    in the Buddhist Dictionary of Pali Proper Names
                                    http://www.palikanon.com/english/pali_names/dic_idx.html

                                    Dimitry
                                  • Ong Yong Peng
                                    Dear Nina, Dimitry and friends, thanks for the pointers. The Dictionary of Proper Names is fantastic, and I have a set back in Singapore too. I will need to
                                    Message 17 of 24 , Jul 16, 2003
                                      Dear Nina, Dimitry and friends,

                                      thanks for the pointers. The Dictionary of Proper Names is fantastic,
                                      and I have a set back in Singapore too. I will need to look at more
                                      resources because I'd like to put in more and go beyond a direct
                                      answer to the question, with a little twist. :-)

                                      Thanks again.

                                      metta,
                                      Yong Peng

                                      --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, Dimitry A. Ivakhnenko wrote:
                                      nvg> Asita which is a beautiful story. We can find this in "Pali
                                      Proper Names", by Malalasekera, PTS. Two huge volumes with info about
                                      persons in Tipitaka and Commentaries.
                                      >
                                      > The story about Asita is available at
                                      > http://www.palikanon.com/english/pali_names/ay/asita.htm
                                      > in the Buddhist Dictionary of Pali Proper Names
                                      > http://www.palikanon.com/english/pali_names/dic_idx.html
                                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.