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Re: Re[2]: [Pali] "Gerund"

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  • Ong Teng Kee
    Hi, Do you have a copy of Intro to pali by Warder.He put gerund (compound gerund for me and undeclineable /absolutive for many other teachers) for pubbakiriya
    Message 1 of 13 , Aug 2 4:33 AM
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      Hi,
      Do you have a copy of Intro to pali by Warder.He put
      gerund (compound gerund for me and undeclineable
      /absolutive for many other teachers)
      for pubbakiriya like gantva-having gone to follow by
      another verb in a phrase.There are some pubbakiriya
      ended in ya ,tvana .
      And in other part he gave action noun (real gerund in
      English grammar)for word like dassana which usually in
      dative case with ya added.This kind is not absolutive
      (undecline like the above )and it is not a verb like
      above.
      I never heard of adverbial participles in english but
      i think i learned it before in german grammar text.
      In pali past and present participles can be used us
      adjective,noun,present and past perfect verb.See
      Warder 's book.


      Teng Kee


      --- "������� ��������� (Dimitry Ivakhnenko)"
      <koleso@...> wrote:
      > Hi,
      >
      > Ong Teng Kee wrote:
      > OTK> I find my english grammar book gives ex.having
      > gone
      > OTK> to(gantva) as compound gerund for this
      > pubbakiriya in
      > OTK> pali.
      > OTK> Action noun like swimming etc is call gerund
      > OTK> .buddhadatta in his grammar book give past
      > participle
      > OTK> can be used freely in the place for
      > pubbakiriya.
      >
      > Thank you, I would like to learn more about
      > pubbakiriya.
      >
      > In Russian beside participles there is a special
      > class of forms called
      > 'adverbial participles' (deeprichastiya), with '-av'
      > ending for past and
      > '-aya' for present, which closely correspond to Pali
      > '-tva' and '-aya' forms.
      >
      > So please write whether '-aya' forms express past or
      > present, so that
      > I will be able to make exact translations.
      >
      > Dimitry
      >
      >
      >
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    • ������� ��������� (Dimitry Ivakhnenko)
      Hi, OTK Do you have a copy of Intro to pali by Warder. No. OTK He put gerund (compound gerund for me and undeclineable OTK /absolutive for many other
      Message 2 of 13 , Aug 2 9:34 AM
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        Hi,

        OTK> Do you have a copy of Intro to pali by Warder.

        No.

        OTK> He put gerund (compound gerund for me and undeclineable
        OTK> /absolutive for many other teachers)
        OTK> for pubbakiriya like gantva-having gone to follow by
        OTK> another verb in a phrase.There are some pubbakiriya
        OTK> ended in ya ,tvana .

        Well, I looked up Sanskrit grammar and found that -tvaa and -ya
        forms really correspond to Russian adverbial participles, however
        both forms can denote either past or present.

        Thus the term 'absolutive' is also fully justified.

        OTK> And in other part he gave action noun (real gerund in
        OTK> English grammar)for word like dassana which usually in
        OTK> dative case with ya added.This kind is not absolutive
        OTK> (undecline like the above )and it is not a verb like
        OTK> above.

        It seems that in this case he is right, dassana - seeing, dassanaaya -
        in order to see, for the purpose of seeing. Maybe he should have called
        this gerund.

        Dimitry
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