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Re: City

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  • rjkjp1 <rjkjp1@yahoo.com>
    ... Dear Rahula, Until you find that sutta a related sutta in the samyutta is: Then Ven. Migajala
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 19, 2003
      ---
      Dear Rahula,
      Until you find that sutta a related sutta in the samyutta is:
      <http://www.accesstoinsight.org/canon/samyutta/sn35-063.html>

      Then Ven. Migajala went to the Blessed One ..: "'A person living
      alone. A person living alone,' thus it is said. To what extent, lord,
      is one a person living alone, and to what extent is one a person
      living with a companion?"
      "Migajala, there are forms cognizable via the eye -- agreeable,
      pleasing, charming, endearing, fostering desire, enticing -- and a
      monk relishes them, welcomes them, & remains fastened to them. As he
      relishes them, welcomes them, & remains fastened to them, delight
      arises. There being delight, he is impassioned. Being impassioned, he
      is fettered. A monk joined with the fetter of delight is said to be a
      person living with a companion.
      "There are sounds cognizable via the ear... aromas cognizable via the
      nose... flavors cognizable via the tongue... tactile sensations
      cognizable via the body... ideas cognizable via the intellect --
      agreeable, pleasing......."A person living in this way -- even if he
      frequents isolated forest & wilderness dwellings, with an unpopulated
      atmosphere, lying far from humanity, appropriate for seclusion -- is
      still said to be living with a companion. Why is that? Because
      craving is his companion, and it has not been abandoned by him. Thus
      he is said to be a person living with a companion.

      "Now, there are forms cognizable via the eye -- agreeable, pleasing,
      charming, endearing, fostering desire, enticing -- and a monk does
      not relish them, welcome them, or remain fastened to them. As he
      doesn't relish them, welcome them, or remain fastened to them,
      delight ceases. There being no delight, he is not impassioned. Being
      not impassioned, he is not fettered. A monk disjoined from the fetter
      of delight is said to be a person living alone.
      "There are sounds cognizable via the ear... aromas cognizable via the
      nose... flavors cognizable via the tongue... tactile sensations ....

      "A person living in this way -- even if he lives near a village,
      associating with monks & nuns, with male & female lay followers, with
      king & royal ministers, with sectarians & their disciples -- is still
      said to be living alone. A person living alone is said to be a monk.
      Why is that? Because craving is his companion, and it has been
      abandoned by him. Thus he is said to be a person living alone."
      endsutta
      Also in Anguttara Nikaya:

      <http://www.abhidhamma.org/Para13.htm>
      The "Gradual Sayings"(III, Book of the Fives, Ch XIX, ยง1, Forest-
      gone) that the Buddha said to the monks:

      "Monks, these five are forest-gone. What five?
      One is forest-gone out of folly and blindness; one out of evil
      desires and longings; one foolish and mind-tossed; one at the
      thought: "It is praised by Buddhas and their disciples"; and one is
      forest-gone just because his wants are little, just for contenment,
      just to mark (his own faults) 8, just for seclusion, just because it
      is the very thing..."
      RobertK


      In Pali@yahoogroups.com, "rahula_80 <rahula_80@y...>"
      <rahula_80@y...> wrote:
      > Hi,
      >
      > I found this on the internet.
      > http://www.sinc.sunysb.edu/Clubs/buddhism/dhammananda/140.htm
      >
      > Can anyone tell me which sutta can the passage be found?
      >
      > Thanks, rahula
      >
      > Sariputta, the chief disciple of the Buddha, said that one man
      might
      > live in a forest devoting himself to ascetic practices, but might
      be
      > full of impure thoughts and 'defilements'. Another might live in a
      > village or a town, practising no ascetic discipline, but his mind
      > might be pure, and free from 'defilements'. 'Of these two,' said,
      > Sariputta, 'the one who lives a pure life in the village or town is
      > definitely far superior to, and greater than, the one who lives in
      > the forest.' (Majjhima Nikaya)
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