Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Question on Cundasutta

Expand Messages
  • Bryan Levman
    Dear Friends,   In the Paramatthajotikā commentary on the origin of the Cundasutta (Sn vv 83-90) , there is a long compound which I can not make sense of  
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 4, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Dear
      Friends,
       
      In the Paramatthajotikā commentary on the origin of the Cundasutta (Sn vv 83-90) , there is a
      long compound which I can not make sense of
       
      attajjhāsaya-parajjhāsaya-aṭṭhuppatti-pucchāvasikabhedato  (PjII 1, 159)


      which is giving a summary of the
      origin of the sutta. I give a rough translation of the  story below. If anyone can help with this
      compound, I would appreciate it. Also does anyone know what kuñcika-tthavikāya (lit: “key-purse”)
      means? Apparently this is the purse that the monk carries his bowl in, but why kuñcika? (“key”)? It is in this bag that
      the bad monk places the bowl he wishes to steal.
       
      Mettā, Bryan
       
      “I ask the sage of abundant wisdom,” so begins the Cundasutta. What is its origin? In brief,
      as far as attajjhāsaya-parajjhāsaya-aṭṭhuppattipucchāvasikabhedato (?) regarding the four origins of this sutta, the origin depends on the (four) questions.
      But in detail, at one time the Blessed One, wandering about
      on a journey amongst the Mallas, together with a large group of monks arrived
      in Pāvā. There the Blessed One was living in the mango grove in Pāvā of Cunda,
      the smith’s son. From here as far as, “Now the Blessed  one in the forenoon dressed himself and
      taking his bowl and robe together with the community of monks went to Cunda’s
      house and sat  down on the seat prepared”
      (as per DN 2, 189) is  just according to
      what has been said (āgatanayeneva) in
      the sutta.
       
      Thus, when the Blessed One had sat down together with the
      community of monks, Cunda the smith’s son, while serving the community of monks
      with the Buddha at his head, presented beautiful (suvaṇṇa or golden) bowls to the monks. Since the religious rule is
      not very well known, some monks accepted the beautiful bowls and others didn’t.
      A stone bowl was accepted by the Blessed One, but Buddhas do not accept a
      second one. In that place there was a certain monk who accepted a beautiful
      bowl  for his food worth a thousand
      (coins), and, with the intention to steal it, he placed it in his key-purse (kuñcika-t-thavikāya?). Cunda, having
      waited on the monks and washed their hands and feet, paying homage to the
      Buddha, observing the community of monks, he saw that monk, but having seen
      him, it was like not seeing him and he did not say anything to the Blessed One
      or the elders out of respect, thinking, “let there not be a manner of speaking
      by those who hold wrong views.” He, wanting to know about monks who were yoked
      to their vows (restraints), or such who had broken them, approached the Blessed
      One at night and asked, “I ask the seer…” [and so the beginning of the sutta]

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Dhivan Thomas Jones
      Dear Brian and Pali group, This reply follows Brian s question from 4 Jan 2013. Thanks Brian for this question. I have been reading earlier parts of the
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 22, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Dear Brian and Pali group,

        This reply follows Brian's question from 4 Jan 2013. Thanks Brian for this question. I have been reading earlier parts of the Paramatthajjotikā recently, so I enjoyed the chance to think about the beginning of the Cundasutta commentary. My understanding of the long compound attajjhāsayaparajjhāsayaaṭṭhuppattipucchāvasikabhedato is that it means: 'according to the division into (bhedato) (i) one's own disposition (attajjhāsaya) (ii) the disposition of another (parajjhāsaya) (iii) the situational meaning (aṭṭha-uppatti) or (iv) answering a question (pucchāvasika)'.

        Hence the commentary is saying that the origin of this sutta (the Cundasutta) is answering the question, in reference to the four origins, which are analysed into: suttas taught on the Buddha's own initiative, suttas taught according to the inclination of the hearers, suttas taught according the present situation, and suttas taught in order to answer a question.

        This division of the Buddha's preaching into kinds of origin is called the cattaro suttanikkhepā or fourfold summary of the suttas and found at e.g. D i.50. Also there is cattāro hi suttanikkhepā attajjhāsayo parajjhāsayo pucchāvasiko aṭṭhuppattiko'ti in the Buddhavaṃsa comm.

        I expect you've worked all this out by now, but I've enjoyed working out for myself too.
        Best wishes
        Dhivan



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.