Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Paali - a name of the language

Expand Messages
  • dymaxion
    A short note about the name of a Buddhist language. The name of the language might have been 500-600 old, but not older. I am not absolutely sure , but I think
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 5, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      A short note about the name of a Buddhist language.

      The name of the language might have been 500-600 old, but not older. I am not absolutely sure , but I think that this present name might be traced back to the 15th century if not the end of the 14th century CE(or 1850 - 1950BE if you prefer a Buddhist chronology).

      AggavaMsa referred to the language he described as "Maagadhabhaasaa".(12th century)

      Of course that the word "Paali" had existed before it became known as a name of the Theravaada language.



      oxy
    • Bryan Levman
      Dear Oxy, According to Norman, Pāli Literature (1983: 1): The word pāli is found in the chronicles and the commentaries upon the canon, but there is has the
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 8, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        Dear Oxy,

        According to Norman, Pāli Literature (1983: 1):

        "The word pāli is found in the chronicles and the commentaries upon the canon, but there is has the meaning "canon" and is used in the sense of a canonical text or phrase as opposed to the commentary (aṭṭhakathā) upon it. The usage is made clear by the fact that the word pāli alternates with tanti."

        Norman gives a number of examples in the footnotes from the
        Mahāvaṃsa, the Visuddhimagga and the commentaries. So the word in this
        usage probably dates from about the 5th century C. E.

        Also from Norman: "It would seem that the name "Pāli" is based upon a misunderstanding of the compound pāli-bhāsā "language of the canon," where the word pāli was taken to stand for the name of a particular bhāsā, as a result of which the word was applied to the language of both canon and commentaries..."


        It would appear that the first usage of "Pāli" to mean a particular language was in the sixteenth century by Simon de la Loubère. Further details are in Norman's book.

        See also von Hinüber, Handbook of Pāli Literature, 1996, §203.


        Metta,

        Bryan







        ________________________________
        From: dymaxion <oxydymaxion@...>
        To: Pali@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, December 5, 2012 8:14:24 AM
        Subject: [Pali] Paali - a name of the language


         
        A short note about the name of a Buddhist language.

        The name of the language might have been 500-600 old, but not older. I am not absolutely sure , but I think that this present name might be traced back to the 15th century if not the end of the 14th century CE(or 1850 - 1950BE if you prefer a Buddhist chronology).

        AggavaMsa referred to the language he described as "Maagadhabhaasaa".(12th century)

        Of course that the word "Paali" had existed before it became known as a name of the Theravaada language.

        oxy




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Dhivan Thomas Jones
        Dear Oxy and Pali group, Just in case you haven t come across it, there is a relevant article by Kate Crosby (2003) “The Origin of the Language Name Pali in
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 8, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          Dear Oxy and Pali group,

          Just in case you haven't come across it, there is a relevant article by Kate Crosby (2003) '�The Origin of the Language Name Pali in Medieval Theravada Literature� in Journal of Buddhist Studies, vol. 2, which traces the use of the word 'Pali' as a name for the language back through Theravada literature.

          Best wishes
          Dhivan





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • dymaxion
          ... The first usage of Paali to mean a particular language in Europe was not the first usage of Paali to mean a particular language in Asia. Besides, he
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 14, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
            > It would appear that the first usage of "Pāli" to mean a particular language was in the sixteenth century by Simon de la Loubère. Further details are in Norman's book.
            >

            The first usage of "Paali" to mean a particular language in Europe was not the first usage of "Paali" to mean a particular language in Asia.
            Besides, he wrote "Balie" and not "Paali". He wrote (quote): "On leur enseigne aussi la langue Balie,..." (I am not willing to translate it.)

            oxy


            http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k5415972c.image.f121
          • Bryan Levman
            Dear Oxy Thanks for the reference to La Loubère s book; I didn t realize it was available on line from the Bibliothèque Nationale de France, - and yes it
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 15, 2012
            • 0 Attachment
              Dear Oxy

              Thanks for the reference to La Loubère's book; I didn't realize it was available on line from the Bibliothèque Nationale de France, - and yes it appears he calls it "Balie" not Pāli,


              Mettā, Bryan


              ________________________________
              From: dymaxion <oxydymaxion@...>
              To: Pali@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Friday, December 14, 2012 1:31:32 PM
              Subject: [Pali] Re: Paali - a name of the language


               

              > It would appear that the first usage of "Pāli" to mean a particular language was in the sixteenth century by Simon de la Loubère. Further details are in Norman's book.
              >

              The first usage of "Paali" to mean a particular language in Europe was not the first usage of "Paali" to mean a particular language in Asia.
              Besides, he wrote "Balie" and not "Paali". He wrote (quote): "On leur enseigne aussi la langue Balie,..." (I am not willing to translate it.)

              oxy

              http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k5415972c.image.f121




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Stephen Hodge
              ... It s shorter in English: They are also taught Pali Best wishes, Stephen Hodge
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 15, 2012
              • 0 Attachment
                Oxydymaxion wrote:

                >He wrote (quote): "On leur enseigne aussi la langue Balie,..." (I am not
                >willing to >translate it.)

                It's shorter in English:

                "They are also taught Pali"

                Best wishes,
                Stephen Hodge
              • Bhikkhu Analayo
                a relevant publication regarding the topic of Paali as the name of a language would also be Crosby, Kate 2004: The Origin of Paali as a Language Name in
                Message 7 of 7 , Dec 20, 2012
                • 0 Attachment
                  a relevant publication regarding the topic of Paali as the name of a language would also be

                  Crosby, Kate 2004: "The Origin of Paali as a Language Name in Medieval Theravaada Literature", Journal of the Center for Buddhist Studies, Sri Lanka, 2: 70-116.



                  available on her webpage http://www.soas.ac.uk/staff/staff30813.php



                  with mettaa

                  Anaalayo



                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Stephen Hodge
                  To: Pali@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Saturday, December 15, 2012 3:26 PM
                  Subject: Re: [Pali] Re: Paali - a name of the language



                  Oxydymaxion wrote:

                  >He wrote (quote): "On leur enseigne aussi la langue Balie,..." (I am not
                  >willing to >translate it.)

                  It's shorter in English:

                  "They are also taught Pali"

                  Best wishes,
                  Stephen Hodge





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.