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Re: [Pali] sithilahanu

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  • SARAH CONNELL
    My P-E dictionary is TW Rhys Davids/W Stede. It lists Sithila as: loose, lax, bending, yielding and Hanu as: jaw. It references sithilahanu as: a kind of
    Message 1 of 6 , May 18, 2012
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      My P-E dictionary is TW Rhys Davids/W Stede. It lists Sithila as: loose, lax,
      bending, yielding and Hanu as: jaw. It references sithilahanu as: a kind of
      bird. As you pointed out it is used only once in the Canon at M I.429 I'm sorry
      I could not be more helpful.
       
      May you be well and happy and always smiling,
       
       Sarah Jane




      ________________________________
      From: jayarava <jayarava@...>
      To: Pali@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Fri, May 18, 2012 10:41:14 AM
      Subject: [Pali] sithilahanu

       
      In M 63 Nanamoli and Bodhi translate sithilahanu as 'stork'. Piya Tan also
      'stork'. However I can find no authority for this. I have checked PED, including
      electronically searching for 'stork'; the Dictionary of Pali Names;
      Buddhadatta's P-E and E-P dictionaries (sv. stork he gives 'bakavisesa'. I've
      tried Sanskrit equivalents in MW and Apte, and Apte's S-E dictionary sv. 'stork'
      (nothing similar). I checked the VRI dictionary that comes with their electronic
      tipitika. I even checked Childers!


      Other translators Thomas (1913) and Gethin (2008) leave the word untranslated.
      Horner (1954-9) "some other bird".

      As far as I can make out the word sithilahanu occurs only once in the Canon (M
      i.429); then once in the commentary on this passage (where it just says eva.m
      naamakassa pakkhino); and once in the sub-commentary (Sithilahanu naama dattaa
      ka.n.no pata"ngo [= ear bird?]). Neither of which translate to 'stork' (do
      they?).

      sithila-hanu would translate as something like 'slack jawed', and the only other
      reference I can find on the web is Shravasti Dhammika's blog where he says
      "Open-billed Storks, sithilahanu in
      Pali."(http://sdhammika.blogspot.co.uk/2008/05/konch.html).


      Can anyone point me to a dictionary or other source where sithilahanu is defined
      as 'stork', or explain why Bodhi/Piya Tan translate it this way?

      Many thanks
      Jayarava




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    • Kumara Bhikkhu
      When I saw slack jawed , my mind imagined a pelican, but is it native to India?
      Message 2 of 6 , May 18, 2012
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        When I saw 'slack jawed', my mind imagined a pelican, but is it native to India?

        jayarava wrote thus at 20:13 27/04/2012:
        >In M 63 Nanamoli and Bodhi translate sithilahanu as 'stork'. Piya Tan also 'stork'. However I can find no authority for this. I have checked PED, including electronically searching for 'stork'; the Dictionary of Pali Names; Buddhadatta's P-E and E-P dictionaries (sv. stork he gives 'bakavisesa'. I've tried Sanskrit equivalents in MW and Apte, and Apte's S-E dictionary sv. 'stork' (nothing similar). I checked the VRI dictionary that comes with their electronic tipitika. I even checked Childers!
        >
        >Other translators Thomas (1913) and Gethin (2008) leave the word untranslated. Horner (1954-9) "some other bird".
        >
        >As far as I can make out the word sithilahanu occurs only once in the Canon (M i.429); then once in the commentary on this passage (where it just says eva.m naamakassa pakkhino); and once in the sub-commentary (Sithilahanu naama dattaa ka.n.no pata"ngo [= ear bird?]). Neither of which translate to 'stork' (do they?).
        >
        >sithila-hanu would translate as something like 'slack jawed', and the only other reference I can find on the web is Shravasti Dhammika's blog where he says "Open-billed Storks, sithilahanu in Pali."(http://sdhammika.blogspot.co.uk/2008/05/konch.html).
        >
        >Can anyone point me to a dictionary or other source where sithilahanu is defined as 'stork', or explain why Bodhi/Piya Tan translate it this way?
        >
        >Many thanks
        >Jayarava
      • jayarava
        Bryan Thanks. Do you have the Taisho reference for that Agama text? I d like to look at it. Some websites have the Hindi name of the openbilled stork as
        Message 3 of 6 , May 20, 2012
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          Bryan

          Thanks. Do you have the Taisho reference for that Agama text? I'd like to look at it.

          Some websites have the Hindi name of the openbilled stork as "Naththai Kuththi Narai" (but I can't make sense of this transliteration - I'm not convinced it's even Hindi). I've sent emails to Indian bird websites to try to get local names, and await replies. Hopefully I won't die before I get the information ;-)

          Regards
          Jayarava
        • Bryan Levman
          Hi Jayarava, Yes, it s T01n0026_p0805a11, the end of the list along with the other birds whose feathers might furnish the arrow. Let us know if you find
          Message 4 of 6 , May 20, 2012
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            Hi Jayarava,

            Yes, it's T01n0026_p0805a11, the end of the list along with the other birds whose feathers might furnish the arrow. Let us know if you find anything,

            Metta, Bryan





            ________________________________
            From: jayarava <jayarava@...>
            To: Pali@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sunday, May 20, 2012 7:18:10 AM
            Subject: [Pali] Re: sithilahanu


             
            Bryan

            Thanks. Do you have the Taisho reference for that Agama text? I'd like to look at it.

            Some websites have the Hindi name of the openbilled stork as "Naththai Kuththi Narai" (but I can't make sense of this transliteration - I'm not convinced it's even Hindi). I've sent emails to Indian bird websites to try to get local names, and await replies. Hopefully I won't die before I get the information ;-)

            Regards
            Jayarava




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