Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Two papers published in the Journal of Buddhist Ethics

Expand Messages
  • ashinpan
    Dear members, I have uploaded two papers which I have published in the Journal of Buddhist Ethics with the agreement of the JBE editor. One is titled
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 18, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      Dear members,

      I have uploaded two papers which I have published in the Journal of Buddhist Ethics with the agreement of the JBE editor.

      One is titled "Tithiyaparivāsa vis-à-vis Noviciation in Theravādin Monasticism" and the filename is parivasa_samanera_Final.pdf. The abstract is:

      "Tithiyaparivāsa is a particular type of probation in Theravādin
      monasticism that former ascetics of certain heretic groups must undergo if they wish to gain admission to the Buddhist Order. In the extant probation procedure as found in the Pāli Vinaya tradition, there is no explicit accounting for the stage of novicehood. Why? This paper attempts to answer that question and also in the process discovers an unexpected insight into the legally ambiguous status of noviciation."

      The other is titled "The Buddha and the Māgadha-Vajjī War" and the file name is Buddha.and.the.Magadha.Vajji.War_Final.pdf. The abstract is:

      "According to an account recorded in Mahāparinibbānasutta, the Buddha had to meet a royal minister named Vassakāra when King Ajātasattu ordered the latter to visit the Buddha and inform him about the king's plan to subdue the Vajjīs. After hearing Vassakāra, the Buddha spoke on seven Conditions of Welfare (satta aparihāniyā dhammā), which would ensure the prosperity of the Vajjīs as long as its citizens observed them. Vassakāra shrewdly inferred from the Buddha‖s discourse how to defeat the Vajjī people and later actually forced them into submission. Regarding that event, there are some perplexing questions:

      1. Why did King Ajātasattu choose to consult a wandering ascetic on a significant matter of state like fighting a war?
      2. Vassakāra discerned how to defeat the Vajjīs from the Buddha's exposition of the Seven Conditions of Welfare (satta aparihāniyā dhammā). So did the Buddha intend to help Ajātasattu defeat the Vajjīs? If not, what was his purpose in expounding the seven Conditions of Welfare to Vassakāra?
      3. If the Buddha really did not accept any kind of violence, as the tradition would have it, why did he not openly speak against it?

      This paper will attempt to answer these questions and will argue, in the conclusion, that this event shows the Buddha‖s disapproving attitude toward a political role of the Buddhist Order."

      These papers together with their earlier drafts are in the Ven. Pandita folder of the Files section. Those who care to compare the draft and final forms of the papers will see how the critical fire of the peer-review process has modified, and (I hope) improved the papers.

      with metta,

      Ven. Pandita
    • Bankei
      Thank you Bhante for writing the papers and sharing them with us. I will look forward to reading them soon. Bankei ... [Non-text portions of this message have
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 22, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        Thank you Bhante for writing the papers and sharing them with us. I will
        look forward to reading them soon.

        Bankei

        On 19 March 2011 17:41, ashinpan <ashinpan@...> wrote:

        >
        >
        >
        > Dear members,
        >
        > I have uploaded two papers which I have published in the Journal of
        > Buddhist Ethics with the agreement of the JBE editor.
        >
        > One is titled "Tithiyapariv� sa vis-� -vis Noviciation in Therav� din
        > Monasticism" and the filename is parivasa_samanera_Final.pdf. The abstract
        > is:
        >
        > "Tithiyapariv� sa is a particular type of probation in Therav� din
        > monasticism that former ascetics of certain heretic groups must undergo if
        > they wish to gain admission to the Buddhist Order. In the extant probation
        > procedure as found in the P� li Vinaya tradition, there is no explicit
        > accounting for the stage of novicehood. Why? This paper attempts to answer
        > that question and also in the process discovers an unexpected insight into
        > the legally ambiguous status of noviciation."
        >
        > The other is titled "The Buddha and the M� gadha-Vajj�� War" and the file
        > name is Buddha.and.the.Magadha.Vajji.War_Final.pdf. The abstract is:
        >
        > "According to an account recorded in Mah� parinibb� nasutta, the Buddha had
        > to meet a royal minister named Vassak� ra when King Aj� tasattu ordered the
        > latter to visit the Buddha and inform him about the king's plan to subdue
        > the Vajj��s. After hearing Vassak� ra, the Buddha spoke on seven Conditions
        > of Welfare (satta aparih� niy� dhamm� ), which would ensure the prosperity
        > of the Vajj��s as long as its citizens observed them. Vassak� ra shrewdly
        > inferred from the Buddha���s discourse how to defeat the Vajj�� people and
        > later actually forced them into submission. Regarding that event, there are
        > some perplexing questions:
        >
        > 1. Why did King Aj� tasattu choose to consult a wandering ascetic on a
        > significant matter of state like fighting a war?
        > 2. Vassak� ra discerned how to defeat the Vajj��s from the Buddha's
        > exposition of the Seven Conditions of Welfare (satta aparih� niy� dhamm� ).
        > So did the Buddha intend to help Aj� tasattu defeat the Vajj��s? If not,
        > what was his purpose in expounding the seven Conditions of Welfare to
        > Vassak� ra?
        > 3. If the Buddha really did not accept any kind of violence, as the
        > tradition would have it, why did he not openly speak against it?
        >
        > This paper will attempt to answer these questions and will argue, in the
        > conclusion, that this event shows the Buddha���s disapproving attitude
        > toward a political role of the Buddhist Order."
        >
        > These papers together with their earlier drafts are in the Ven. Pandita
        > folder of the Files section. Those who care to compare the draft and final
        > forms of the papers will see how the critical fire of the peer-review
        > process has modified, and (I hope) improved the papers.
        >
        > with metta,
        >
        > Ven. Pandita
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • ashinpan
        Dear Bankei, ... Thanks for your interest. I hope you will have something to comment on the ideas in my papers, and if you do, please let me know through the
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 26, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          Dear Bankei,

          You wrote:

          > Thank you Bhante for writing the papers and sharing them with us. I will look forward to reading them soon.

          Thanks for your interest. I hope you will have something to comment on the ideas in my papers, and if you do, please let me know through the group.

          with metta,

          Ven. Pandita
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.