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Voc Plural used with Personal Name

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  • sponberg
    Can anyone provide me with a reference to one or more of the standard Pali grammars to support footnotes in translations from both Horner and Warder
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 3, 2010
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      Can anyone provide me with a reference to one or more of the standard Pali grammars to support footnotes in translations from both Horner and Warder (separately) to the effect that the vocative masculine plural of a personal name may be used when addressing a group that includes the individual whose name occurs in the plural. I'd also be curious to know if this usage of the vocative plural is acceptable in Classical Sanskrit.

      I'm travelling at the moment, so I don't have access to the grammars I would normally consult. Duroiselle (on-line version) gives both a and aa for the mas. sing., as does Bhikkhu Nyanatusita's declension table, but I wonder if this is a misunderstanding of the distinctive use of the plural of a personal name reported by both Horner and Warder.

      Thanks in advance.

      Alan Sponberg
    • Bryan Levman
      Dear Alan, I think you re referring to Warder, Introduction to Pali, 3rd edition, 2001, page 165, footnote 4, where the Buddha addresses Vaase.t.tha in the
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 3, 2010
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        Dear Alan,

        I think you're referring to Warder, Introduction to Pali, 3rd edition, 2001,
        page 165, footnote 4, where the Buddha addresses Vaase.t.tha in the voc. plural
        as Vaase.t.thaa, as he hs referring to both Vaase.t.thaa and Bhaaradvaaja (DN
        iii, 81).

        I'm not familiar with this usage in classical Sanskrit; but remember there is a
        dual in Skt., so if it were used presumably it would be dual (-au), but as I
        said, I've never seen it,

        Best, Bryan




        ________________________________
        From: sponberg <alan.sponberg@...>
        To: Pali@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tue, August 3, 2010 5:15:27 PM
        Subject: [Pali] Voc Plural used with Personal Name


        Can anyone provide me with a reference to one or more of the standard Pali
        grammars to support footnotes in translations from both Horner and Warder
        (separately) to the effect that the vocative masculine plural of a personal name
        may be used when addressing a group that includes the individual whose name
        occurs in the plural. I'd also be curious to know if this usage of the vocative
        plural is acceptable in Classical Sanskrit.

        I'm travelling at the moment, so I don't have access to the grammars I would
        normally consult. Duroiselle (on-line version) gives both a and aa for the mas.
        sing., as does Bhikkhu Nyanatusita's declension table, but I wonder if this is a
        misunderstanding of the distinctive use of the plural of a personal name
        reported by both Horner and Warder.


        Thanks in advance.

        Alan Sponberg






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      • Nina van Gorkom
        Dear Alan and Bryan, ... N: I have met this more often. For example in MIII, sutta 128 Upakkilesasutta: Anuruddhas, Anuruddha and companions, namely Ven.
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 4, 2010
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          Dear Alan and Bryan,
          Op 3-aug-2010, om 23:44 heeft Bryan Levman het volgende geschreven:

          > I think you're referring to Warder, Introduction to Pali, 3rd
          > edition, 2001,
          > page 165, footnote 4, where the Buddha addresses Vaase.t.tha in the
          > voc. plural
          > as Vaase.t.thaa, as he hs referring to both Vaase.t.thaa and
          > Bhaaradvaaja (DN
          > iii, 81).
          --------
          N: I have met this more often. For example in MIII, sutta 128
          Upakkilesasutta: Anuruddhas, Anuruddha and companions, namely Ven.
          Nandiya and KImbila."I hope things are going well with you,
          Anuruddhas..."

          Nina.



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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