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Buddhadhamma In The Buddha's Own Words

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  • abhidhammika
    Dear Dhamma friends How are you? The following is my reply to the facinating thread regarding Stephen s post Is Buddhadhamma pessimistic? . Coincidently, I
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 27, 2002
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      Dear Dhamma friends

      How are you?

      The following is my reply to the facinating thread regarding
      Stephen's post "Is Buddhadhamma pessimistic?".

      Coincidently, I have recently translated Section 49, Catunipaata
      Paali, Anguttarakikaayo.

      The statements of the Buddha in that Section 49 seem to be describing
      what Buddhadhamma really is in the Buddha's own words.

      When I read these statements of the Buddha, they support the
      understanding of Brian and Jack while they seem to contradict the
      views of Stephen, James, Beth and Joyce (due to her Maya quote). But,
      no big deal! Appreciation of the Buddha's teachings is a slow,
      gradual and (often painful) process. Now, I also sound pessimistic as
      I wrote "(often painful) process".

      As there are Pali scholars and students on this list, I also included
      the original Pali passages so that they can perform "Syntax Walk-
      through" on my translations and trace Pali terms and their
      counterparts in English.

      Please view the following literal translation.


      --------------------------------------------

      VIPALLAASA SUTTAM


      "Cattaarome, bhikkhave, saññaavipallaasaa cittavipallaasaa
      di.t.thivipallaasaa. katame cattaaro? anicce, bhikkhave, niccanti
      saññaavipallaaso cittavipallaaso di.t.thivipallaaso; dukkhe,
      bhikkhave, sukhanti saññaavipallaaso cittavipallaaso
      di.t.thivipallaaso; anattani, bhikkhave, attaati
      saññaavipallaaso cittavipallaaso di.t.thivipallaaso; asubhe,
      bhikkhave, subhanti saññaavipallaaso cittavipallaaso
      di.t.thivipallaaso. ime kho, bhikkhave, cattaaro
      saññaavipallaasaa cittavipallaasaa di.t.thivipallaasaa.

      "Cattaarome, bhikkhave, nasaññaavipallaasaa
      nacittavipallaasaa nadi.t.thivipallaasaa. katame cattaaro?
      anicce, bhikkhave, aniccanti nasaññaavipallaaso
      nacittavipallaaso nadi.t.thivipallaaso; dukkhe, bhikkhave,
      dukkhanti nasaññaavipallaaso nacittavipallaaso
      nadi.t.thivipallaaso; anattani, bhikkhave, anattaati
      nasaññaavipallaaso nacittavipallaaso nadi.t.thivipallaaso; asubhe,
      bhikkhave, asubhanti nasaññaavipallaaso nacittavipallaaso
      nadi.t.thivipallaaso. ime kho, bhikkhave, cattaaro
      nasaññaavipallaasaa nacittavipallaasaa nadi.t.thivipallaasaa"ti.


      ABERRATIONS

      Monks, these four are aberrations of memory, aberrations of
      consciousness and aberrations of view. What are the four? Monks,
      taking permanence in impermanence is aberration of memory, aberration
      of consciousness and aberration of view. Monks, taking pleasure in
      misery is aberration of memory, aberration of consciousness and
      aberration of view. Monks, taking self in selflessness is aberration
      of memory, aberration of consciousness and aberration of view. Monks,
      taking beauty in ugliness is aberration of memory, aberration of
      consciousness and aberration of view. Monks, these four are
      aberrations of memory, aberrations of consciousness and aberrations
      of view.

      Monks, these four are sanities of memory, sanities of consciousness
      and sanities of view. What are the four? Monks, taking impermanence
      in impermanence is sanity of memory, sanity of consciousness and
      sanity of view. Monks, taking misery in misery is sanity of memory,
      sanity of consciousness and sanity of view. Monks, taking
      selflessness in selflessness is sanity of memory, sanity of
      consciousness and sanity of view. Monks, taking ugliness in ugliness
      is sanity of memory, sanity of consciousness and sanity of view.
      Monks, these four are sanities of memory, sanities of consciousness
      and sanities of view.

      The above Suttam is Section 49, Catunipaata Pali, Anguttaranikaayo.


      According to the VIPALLAASA SUTTAM, the Buddha did not mince his
      words. He called any views aberrant that deviate from four
      characteristics of body and mind (misery, impermanence, selflessness,
      and ugliness).

      If you regard the Buddha's description of real phenomena as misery,
      impermanence, selflessness, and ugliness - as pessimism, then you may
      perhaps need a lot of Buddhist psychotherapy to rid yourselves of
      aberrations (VIPALLAASAA).


      With kind regards,

      Suan Lu Zaw

      http://www.bodhiology.org
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