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Re: [Pali] Q. Abhidhamma Series, no 7. Kamma and Result.

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  • Ardavarz
    Dear friends, I just would like to share a thought that occurs to me - could we translate anatta in a sense with inanimate ? Etymologically it is more or less
    Message 1 of 10 , Apr 10, 2010
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      Dear friends,

      I just would like to share a thought that occurs to me - could we translate anatta in a sense with "inanimate"?
      Etymologically it is more or less equivalent - both anima in Latin and atta in Pali mean "soul", but I am not fully aware of all possible connotations of the word "inanimate" in English. Still I think if one say: "The psyche (or mind) is inanimate", the shock from this seemingly paradoxical (for the common sense) statement could be quite insightful.

      Ardavarz

      --- On Sat, 4/10/10, Nina van Gorkom <vangorko@...> wrote:

      From: Nina van Gorkom <vangorko@...>
      Subject: Re: [Pali] Q. Abhidhamma Series, no 7. Kamma and Result.
      To: Pali@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Saturday, April 10, 2010, 5:12 PM







       









      Dear Bryan,

      Op 9-apr-2010, om 13:25 heeft Bryan Levman het volgende geschreven:



      > Or, in a practical, conventional sense, one can follow the path,

      > but in an ultimate sense, there is no atta at all.

      -------

      N: Just as an addition: one may think of oneself as following a Path

      and then one is in the world of conventional truth, sammutti sacca.

      It is a way of thinking. Whereas, in the ultimate sense, only

      specific cetasikas, the Path-factors, arise with the citta and in

      that way the Path is developing, no one develops it. As I see it, the

      ultimate sense is practical, effective.



      -------

      Nina.



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

























      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Bryan Levman
      Thanks Nina, Bryan ________________________________ From: Nina van Gorkom To: Pali@yahoogroups.com Sent: Sat, April 10, 2010 10:12:55 AM
      Message 2 of 10 , Apr 10, 2010
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        Thanks Nina, Bryan







        ________________________________
        From: Nina van Gorkom <vangorko@...>
        To: Pali@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sat, April 10, 2010 10:12:55 AM
        Subject: Re: [Pali] Q. Abhidhamma Series, no 7. Kamma and Result.


        Dear Bryan,
        Op 9-apr-2010, om 13:25 heeft Bryan Levman het volgende geschreven:

        > Or, in a practical, conventional sense, one can follow the path,
        > but in an ultimate sense, there is no atta at all.
        -------
        N: Just as an addition: one may think of oneself as following a Path
        and then one is in the world of conventional truth, sammutti sacca.
        It is a way of thinking. Whereas, in the ultimate sense, only
        specific cetasikas, the Path-factors, arise with the citta and in
        that way the Path is developing, no one develops it. As I see it, the
        ultimate sense is practical, effective.

        -------
        Nina.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Nina van Gorkom
        Dear Ardavarz and Richard, Thanks for your contribution. ... N: Ardavarz, You are probably thinking of the Pali nijjhiiva, literally: no life. I understand the
        Message 3 of 10 , Apr 11, 2010
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          Dear Ardavarz and Richard,
          Thanks for your contribution.
          Op 10-apr-2010, om 22:09 heeft Ardavarz het volgende geschreven:

          > I just would like to share a thought that occurs to me - could we
          > translate anatta in a sense with "inanimate"?
          > Etymologically it is more or less equivalent - both anima in Latin
          > and atta in Pali mean "soul", but I am not fully aware of all
          > possible connotations of the word "inanimate" in English. Still I
          > think if one say: "The psyche (or mind) is inanimate", the shock
          > from this seemingly paradoxical (for the common sense) statement
          > could be quite insightful.
          -------
          N: Ardavarz, You are probably thinking of the Pali nijjhiiva,
          literally: no life. I understand the difficulty to find an English
          equivalent.
          It is actually absence of a living being.
          I quote from my "Meaning of dhamma: < The following meaning of dhamma
          explained in the Dhammapada-Atthakata, is dhamma as an entity without
          a living soul (nissatta, nijjiva):
          <"Tasmi.m khopana samaye dhammaa honti, khandhaa hontii"ti (dha. sa.
          121)
          Then, at that time dhammas occur, khandhas occur.

          aya.mnissattadhammo naama, nijjiivadhammotipi eso eva.
          this is dhamma without living being (non-substantial), it is also
          merely dhamma without life.
          Tesu imasmi.m .thaane nissattanijjiivadhammo adhippeto.
          As to these, dhamma devoid of a living soul is meant in this case. >

          -------
          The word inanimate can be used for ruupa, materiality. We also take
          ruupa for self, but also ruupa is anattaa.
          -------
          Nina.




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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