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Abhidhamma series, no 3.

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  • Nina van Gorkom
    Dear friends, Abhidhamma series, no 3: Dhamma in detail. In all three parts of the Tipiìaka we are taught about ``dhamma , about everything which is real.
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 18, 2010
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      Dear friends,

      Abhidhamma series, no 3: Dhamma in detail.

      In all three parts of the Tipiìaka we are taught about ``dhamma'',
      about everything which is real. Seeing is a dhamma, it is real.
      Colour is a dhamma, it is real. Feeling is a dhamma, it is real. Our
      defilements are dhammas, they are realities.

      When the Buddha attained enlightenment he clearly knew all dhammas as
      they really are. He taught the ``Dhamma'', the teaching on realities,
      to us in order that we also may know dhammas as they are. Without the
      Buddha's teaching we would be ignorant of reality. We are inclined to
      take for permanent what is impermanent, for pleasant what is
      sorrowful and unsatisfactory (dukkha), and for ``self'' what is non-
      self. The aim of all three parts of the Tipiìaka is to teach people
      the development of the way leading to the end of defilements.
      In the Suttanta, the ``Discourses'', the Dhamma is explained to
      different people at different places on various occasions. The Buddha
      taught about all realities appearing through the ``six doors'' of
      eyes, ears, nose, tongue, bodysense and mind. He taught about cause
      and effect and about the practice leading to the end of all sorrow.

      As regards the Abhidhamma, this is an exposition of all realities in
      detail. The prefix ``abhi'' is used in the sense of ``preponderance''
      or ``distinction''. ``Abhidhamma'' means ``higher dhamma'' or
      ``dhamma in detail''. The form of this part of the Tipiìaka is
      different, but the aim is the same: the eradication of wrong view and
      eventually of all defilements. Thus, when we study the many
      enumerations of realities, we should not forget the real purpose of
      our study. The intellectual understanding of realities (pariyatti)
      should encourage us to the practice (pa.tipatti) which is necessary
      for the realization of the truth (pa.tivedha). While we are studying
      the different mental phenomena (nåmas) and physical phenomena (rúpas)
      and while we are pondering over them, we can be reminded to be aware
      of the nåma and rúpa which appear at this moment. In this way we will
      discover more and more that the Abhidhamma explains everything which
      is real, that is, the ``worlds'' appearing through the six doors of
      the senses and the mind.

      ******
      Nina.





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