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Last words of the Buddha...

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  • Ong Yong Peng
    Dear friends, a senior pastor from Singapore recently made unruly comments and insensitive remarks on Buddhism. Pastor Rony Tan, who claims to have a
    Message 1 of 19 , Feb 14, 2010
      Dear friends,

      a senior pastor from Singapore recently made unruly comments and insensitive remarks on Buddhism. Pastor Rony Tan, who claims to have a congregation of 12,000+ in Singapore, made a video of a church service speech. In this video, Pastor Tan referred to Buddhism and each time accompanied it with his opinion of the religion. I watched this video, which was first available from Tan's website and subsequently in several video sharing websites. This matter has created a huge outcry within Singapore's civic circles on various fronts. Tan has since apologised for his actions, and promised not to repeat the same mistake again.

      In this past decade, we have seen almost daily how bigotry and fundamentalism has caused tensions and conflicts within communities and across continents. It is human to err, but irresponsible religious speeches can threaten social stability of a secular country like Singapore. It is not my intention to "talk" about the person on this forum. Only one point I like to discuss: at one point in the speech, Pastor Tan said that when the Buddha was about to pass away, he uttered the last words "I am still seeking the way."

      I thought I have heard this before, but used on someone else. So, I am curious if Christian evangelicals used "canned messages" in their preaching to win ignorant converts. Is there anyone who knows Christian evangelism methods well enough to comment?

      Also, "I am still seeking the way." is obviously a quote taken from someone or somewhere and inadequately applied to the Buddha. Please correct me if I am wrong, but I am sure most Buddhists would agree the Buddha's final words are "Transient are all compounded things, strive on with diligence!". This is of course from the Pali tradition. Is there any difference from the Chinese and Tibetan traditions?

      Thank you.


      metta,
      Yong Peng.
    • frank
      The only thing I know about Buddha s final moments are from parinibbana sutta and mahaparinibbana sutta. English and pali online versions of those suttas are
      Message 2 of 19 , Feb 14, 2010
        The only thing I know about Buddha's final moments are from parinibbana
        sutta and mahaparinibbana sutta. English and pali online versions of
        those suttas are available, their chinese and other counterparts are
        here (for the benefit of chinese and sanskrit readers on the list who
        would like to inspect directly):

        [S. 6.15 ] parinibbana sutta:
        http://www.suttacentral.net/disp_correspondence.php?division_acronym=SN%206&sutta_number=15.0&sutta_coded_name=Parinibb%C4%81na&volpage_info=SN%20I%20157&sutta_id=372
        [D. 16] mahaparinibbana sutta :
        http://www.suttacentral.net/disp_correspondence.php?division_acronym=DN&sutta_number=16.0&sutta_coded_name=Mah%C4%81parinibb%C4%81na&volpage_info=DN%20II%2072&sutta_id=16


        I can't read Chinese so I don't know what the counterparts say or
        whether they add anything.

        I do know from reading many english translations of pali suttas that the
        Buddha frequently said things similar to : 'He is indeed a Blessed One,
        an arahant, rightly self-awakened: consummate in knowledge & conduct,
        well-gone, a knower of the cosmos, an unexcelled trainer of those
        persons ready to be tamed, teacher of human & divine beings, awakened,
        blessed. He has made known --- having realized it through direct
        knowledge --- this world with its devas, maras, & brahmas, its
        generations with their contemplatives & priests, their rulers & common
        people. He has explained the Dhamma admirable in the beginning,
        admirable in the middle, admirable in the end; has expounded the holy
        life both in its particulars & in its essence, entirely perfect,
        surpassingly pure. It is good to see such a worthy one.'"

        In other passages, he said, "I see no one in this world who could answer
        [some difficult existential question] except myself or one of my
        disciples."

        Recall the first sermon before the turning of the wheel, where the
        buddha proclaimed, "I am the perfectly enlightened one." The person who
        heard that thought, "I don't believe this guy", shook his head, said
        something like, "Yeah, sure you're perfectly enlightened." and walked
        away. (anyone know the sutta and # for that?)

        Another passage (anyone know sutta and #?): The buddha said something
        like, "See this dirt in my pinky finger nail? How much dirt is there
        compared to all the dirt on the planet? Similarly the knowledge I'm
        imparting to you guys is just a tiny fraction of my vast knowledge. Why?
        I only teach you guys what is spiritually relevant for your complete
        deliverance from dukkha."

        When other brahmans debated with Buddha, I recall passages where they
        basically said to the buddha, "I can beat you in a debate," and the
        Buddha said something to the effect of, "There's no way you could kick
        my ass but I will indulge your question anyway and thoroughly defeat it."

        If a heretic or religion wanted to criticize the Buddha, they have a
        better chance and a stronger argument through other means. To claim the
        Buddha did not know, that "he is still seeking the way", they would be
        hard pressed to find scriptural evidence of that.


        -Frank

        On 2/14/2010 4:24 AM, Ong Yong Peng wrote:
        >
        > Dear friends,
        >
        > a senior pastor from Singapore recently made unruly comments and
        > insensitive remarks on Buddhism. Pastor Rony Tan, who claims to have a
        > congregation of 12,000+ in Singapore, made a video of a church service
        > speech. In this video, Pastor Tan referred to Buddhism and each time
        > accompanied it with his opinion of the religion. I watched this video,
        > which was first available from Tan's website and subsequently in
        > several video sharing websites. This matter has created a huge outcry
        > within Singapore's civic circles on various fronts. Tan has since
        > apologised for his actions, and promised not to repeat the same
        > mistake again.
        >
        > In this past decade, we have seen almost daily how bigotry and
        > fundamentalism has caused tensions and conflicts within communities
        > and across continents. It is human to err, but irresponsible religious
        > speeches can threaten social stability of a secular country like
        > Singapore. It is not my intention to "talk" about the person on this
        > forum. Only one point I like to discuss: at one point in the speech,
        > Pastor Tan said that when the Buddha was about to pass away, he
        > uttered the last words "I am still seeking the way."
        >
        > I thought I have heard this before, but used on someone else. So, I am
        > curious if Christian evangelicals used "canned messages" in their
        > preaching to win ignorant converts. Is there anyone who knows
        > Christian evangelism methods well enough to comment?
        >
        > Also, "I am still seeking the way." is obviously a quote taken from
        > someone or somewhere and inadequately applied to the Buddha. Please
        > correct me if I am wrong, but I am sure most Buddhists would agree the
        > Buddha's final words are "Transient are all compounded things, strive
        > on with diligence!". This is of course from the Pali tradition. Is
        > there any difference from the Chinese and Tibetan traditions?
        >
        > Thank you.
        >
        > metta,
        > Yong Peng.
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • frank
        There s another sutta I m thinking of relevant to the preacher s question, but it turns the question and answer back on him. I believe it occurs in Samyutta
        Message 3 of 19 , Feb 14, 2010
          There's another sutta I'm thinking of relevant to the preacher's
          question, but it turns the question and answer back on him. I believe
          it occurs in Samyutta first or second sections (Devas and devatas).
          I browsed through access to insight's selections on those sections and
          didn't see the sutta I'm thinking of.

          It's the sutta that goes something like this:

          One of the Buddha's disciples, I don't think it was Mogollana, but a
          disciple who did have the ability to travel to any deva realm.
          He tracked down the highest ranking god/brahma, and asked him a tough
          question, something like, "Is there a place where the four elements have
          no footing, where light and consciousness have no place to land?" Brahma
          repsonded with something like, "I am Brahma, the almighty, all powerful.
          There is nothing that is not within my domain of knowing."
          Yet he didn't answer the disciple's question.
          Brahma then did some kind of evasive maneuver, trying to hide in a
          higher brahma realm or realm of higher meditative attainment, but this
          was a powerful disciple and for a second time and a third time he
          tracked him down to ask the question, "is there a place where the 4
          elements...". And for the 2nd and 3rd time, Brahma responded the same way.

          The disciple, frustrated, said, "Look here Brahma, I asked you this
          question and you keep giving me this weak evasive response without
          answering. What's up with that?"

          Brahma replies: " Hey man, you made me look bad in front of my guys, the
          other Brahmas and devas who look up to me by asking me a question I
          don't know the answer to. Why you hassling me in the first place, when
          you're a disciple of the Buddha, the all knowing one? He can answer your
          question." The disciple asks the Buddha, who of course answers it.

          I just pulled out the CDOB and flipped quickly through the first
          sections, didn't see it. Maybe the sutta I'm thinking of is in Digha or
          Majjhima?
        • Ong Yong Peng
          Dear Frank, thank you. However, I think you have gone too much into the details, and the narrative. ;-) I am surprised you don t read Chinese. Isn t Kuan a
          Message 4 of 19 , Feb 14, 2010
            Dear Frank, thank you. However, I think you have gone too much into the details, and the narrative. ;-)

            I am surprised you don't read Chinese. Isn't Kuan a Chinese surname?


            metta,
            Yong Peng.


            --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, frank wrote:

            The only thing I know about Buddha's final moments are from parinibbana sutta and mahaparinibbana sutta.
          • frank
            Hi Yong Peng, I understand where you re coming from in terms of trying to keep the list focused on pali, but you did ask an interesting question, and sometimes
            Message 5 of 19 , Feb 14, 2010
              Hi Yong Peng,
              I understand where you're coming from in terms of trying to keep the
              list focused on pali, but you did ask an interesting question, and
              sometimes surveying the tangents will spark someone's memory to come up
              with the precise detail you were looking for, whereas if everyone is too
              worried all the time about staying exactly within topic, the tension
              may prevent their body and mind from loosening up enough to think of a
              solution.
              As a child I declined the "option" to learn reading/writing Chinese.
              I can speak and comprehend a kindergarten level of spoken Mandarin, and
              I've been making an effort lately to learn how to read and write some
              important Chinese words like impermanence, suffering, not-self, noble
              eightfold way. Other than that I learn languages and vocabulary on a
              need-to-know basis.
              -Frank



              On 2/14/2010 12:05 PM, Ong Yong Peng wrote:
              >
              > Dear Frank, thank you. However, I think you have gone too much into
              > the details, and the narrative. ;-)
              >
              > I am surprised you don't read Chinese. Isn't Kuan a Chinese surname?
              >
              > metta,
              > Yong Peng.
              >



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Piya Tan
              Dear Frank, You must be thinking of the Keva.d.dha (or Keva.t.ta) Sutta (D 11 = SD 1.7), which will be appearing in SD 1, probably out in March. A very
              Message 6 of 19 , Feb 14, 2010
                Dear Frank,

                You must be thinking of the Keva.d.dha (or Keva.t.ta) Sutta (D 11 = SD 1.7),
                which will be appearing in SD 1, probably out in March.

                A very humourous sutta, but with profound teachings.

                With metta,

                Piya

                On Mon, Feb 15, 2010 at 1:56 AM, frank <fcckuan@...> wrote:

                >
                >
                >
                > There's another sutta I'm thinking of relevant to the preacher's
                > question, but it turns the question and answer back on him. I believe
                > it occurs in Samyutta first or second sections (Devas and devatas).
                > I browsed through access to insight's selections on those sections and
                > didn't see the sutta I'm thinking of.
                >
                > It's the sutta that goes something like this:
                >
                > One of the Buddha's disciples, I don't think it was Mogollana, but a
                > disciple who did have the ability to travel to any deva realm.
                > He tracked down the highest ranking god/brahma, and asked him a tough
                > question, something like, "Is there a place where the four elements have
                > no footing, where light and consciousness have no place to land?" Brahma
                > repsonded with something like, "I am Brahma, the almighty, all powerful.
                > There is nothing that is not within my domain of knowing."
                > Yet he didn't answer the disciple's question.
                > Brahma then did some kind of evasive maneuver, trying to hide in a
                > higher brahma realm or realm of higher meditative attainment, but this
                > was a powerful disciple and for a second time and a third time he
                > tracked him down to ask the question, "is there a place where the 4
                > elements...". And for the 2nd and 3rd time, Brahma responded the same way.
                >
                > The disciple, frustrated, said, "Look here Brahma, I asked you this
                > question and you keep giving me this weak evasive response without
                > answering. What's up with that?"
                >
                > Brahma replies: " Hey man, you made me look bad in front of my guys, the
                > other Brahmas and devas who look up to me by asking me a question I
                > don't know the answer to. Why you hassling me in the first place, when
                > you're a disciple of the Buddha, the all knowing one? He can answer your
                > question." The disciple asks the Buddha, who of course answers it.
                >
                > I just pulled out the CDOB and flipped quickly through the first
                > sections, didn't see it. Maybe the sutta I'm thinking of is in Digha or
                > Majjhima?
                >
                >
                >



                --
                The Minding Centre
                Blk 644 Bukit Batok Central #01-68 (2nd flr)
                Singapore 650644
                Tel: 8211 0879
                Meditation courses & therapy: http://themindingcentre.org
                Sutta translation: https://dharmafarer.org


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Ong Yong Peng
                Dear Frank, thank you. By pointing out the Chinese and Sanskrit correspondences of the Parinibbana and Mahaparinibbana suttas, you are indirectly stating that
                Message 7 of 19 , Feb 15, 2010
                  Dear Frank,

                  thank you. By pointing out the Chinese and Sanskrit correspondences of the Parinibbana and Mahaparinibbana suttas, you are indirectly stating that accounts of the Buddha's last moments are consistent in various sources. I was looking for a more direct answer, and also asking of any alternative account(s). This is related to my question of the quote "I am still seeking the way."

                  metta,
                  Yong Peng.


                  --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, frank wrote:

                  I understand where you're coming from in terms of trying to keep the list focused on pali, but you did ask an interesting question, and sometimes surveying the tangents will spark someone's memory to come up with the precise detail you were looking for, whereas if everyone is too worried all the time about staying exactly within topic, the tension may prevent their body and mind from loosening up enough to think of a solution.
                • frank
                  Thanks Piya, that s the one. I re-read that section just now, interesting that the visiting monk has no name, as well as the Maha-brahma. Is Maha-brahma the
                  Message 8 of 19 , Feb 15, 2010
                    Thanks Piya, that's the one. I re-read that section just now,
                    interesting that the visiting monk has no name, as well as the
                    Maha-brahma. Is Maha-brahma the same as Brahma Sahampati? The chain of
                    devas mentioned included
                    Sakka,

                    "The Yama gods said, 'We also don't know...

                    "Suyama said, 'I also don't know...

                    "Santusita said, 'I also don't know...

                    "The Nimmanarati gods said, 'We also don't know...

                    "Sunimmita said, 'I also don't know...

                    "The Paranimmitavasavatti gods said, 'We also don't know...

                    "So the monk approached the god Vasavatti ....
                    then maha-brahma.

                    No mention is made of Brahma sahampati. Is he part of the retinue of
                    maha-brahma, or is he in fact one and the same as maha-brahma?

                    [D. 11] thanissaro version, relevant section is near end
                    http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/dn/dn.11.0.than.html

                    - Frank

                    p.s. interesting note, we almost have a harmonic convergence of all the
                    pali threads from the past week colliding in one message from seemingly
                    unrelated origins. All I need to do to make it happen is ask, "How do
                    you pronounce Brahma sahampati in Finnish?" :)


                    On 2/14/2010 4:56 PM, Piya Tan wrote:
                    > Dear Frank,
                    >
                    > You must be thinking of the Keva.d.dha (or Keva.t.ta) Sutta (D 11 = SD 1.7),
                    > which will be appearing in SD 1, probably out in March.
                    >
                    > A very humourous sutta, but with profound teachings.
                    >
                    > With metta,
                    >
                    > Piya
                    >
                    > On Mon, Feb 15, 2010 at 1:56 AM, frank<fcckuan@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> There's another sutta I'm thinking of relevant to the preacher's
                    >> question, but it turns the question and answer back on him. I believe
                    >> it occurs in Samyutta first or second sections (Devas and devatas).
                    >> I browsed through access to insight's selections on those sections and
                    >> didn't see the sutta I'm thinking of.
                    >>
                    >> It's the sutta that goes something like this:
                    >>
                    >> One of the Buddha's disciples, I don't think it was Mogollana, but a
                    >> disciple who did have the ability to travel to any deva realm.
                    >> He tracked down the highest ranking god/brahma, and asked him a tough
                    >> question, something like, "Is there a place where the four elements have
                    >> no footing, where light and consciousness have no place to land?" Brahma
                    >> repsonded with something like, "I am Brahma, the almighty, all powerful.
                    >> There is nothing that is not within my domain of knowing."
                    >> Yet he didn't answer the disciple's question.
                    >> Brahma then did some kind of evasive maneuver, trying to hide in a
                    >> higher brahma realm or realm of higher meditative attainment, but this
                    >> was a powerful disciple and for a second time and a third time he
                    >> tracked him down to ask the question, "is there a place where the 4
                    >> elements...". And for the 2nd and 3rd time, Brahma responded the same way.
                    >>
                    >> The disciple, frustrated, said, "Look here Brahma, I asked you this
                    >> question and you keep giving me this weak evasive response without
                    >> answering. What's up with that?"
                    >>
                    >> Brahma replies: " Hey man, you made me look bad in front of my guys, the
                    >> other Brahmas and devas who look up to me by asking me a question I
                    >> don't know the answer to. Why you hassling me in the first place, when
                    >> you're a disciple of the Buddha, the all knowing one? He can answer your
                    >> question." The disciple asks the Buddha, who of course answers it.
                    >>
                    >> I just pulled out the CDOB and flipped quickly through the first
                    >> sections, didn't see it. Maybe the sutta I'm thinking of is in Digha or
                    >> Majjhima?
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • Bryan Levman
                    Dear Yong Peng, ... someone or somewhere and inadequately applied to the Buddha. Please correct me if I am wrong, but I am sure most Buddhists would agree the
                    Message 9 of 19 , Feb 15, 2010
                      Dear Yong Peng,

                      >Also, "I am still seeking the way." is obviously a quote taken from
                      someone or somewhere and inadequately applied >to the Buddha. Please
                      correct me if I am wrong, but I am sure most Buddhists would agree the
                      Buddha's final words >are "Transient are all compounded things, strive
                      on with diligence!". This is of course from the Pali tradition. Is
                      there >any difference from the Chinese and Tibetan traditions?

                      There are seven sources of the Buddha's last words that I am aware of. Two in Indic languages (Pāli and Buddhist Sanskrit), one in the Tibetan Vinaya, and four in the Chinese canon. In his 1944 work (Die Uberlieferung vom Lebensende des Buddha) Waldschmidt gives a summary (in German) of all but the Tibetan (page 249 - 250). No one has ever translated these into English that I am aware of. None of these have anything about "I am still seeking the way".
                      1) The Pali everyone is familiar with
                      2) the Sanskrit is from the Muulasarvaastivaadin school. Partial translation is as follows:
                      [after the silence of the monks re: any doubts that they want the Buddha to answer] Then the Blessed One uncovered his upper robe on one side and showed his body to the monks. "Look, Monks, at the body of the Tathaagata, examine the body of the Tathaagata closely. What is the reason for this? Tathaagatas, arahants, are hard to see, as difficult as an Udumbara flower. Indeed, Monks, you may remain silent: all conditioned things are subject to dissolution." These were the Buddha's last words.
                      42.9 atha bhagavaan
                      svakaayaad uttarāsa`ngam ekānte viv.rtya bhik.suun aamantrayate ||
                      42.10 avalokayata bhik.savas tathaagatasya kaayam || vyavalokayata bhik.savas tathaagatasya
                      kaayam || tat kasmaad dheto.h|| durlabhadar"sanaa yasmaat tathaagataa arhanta.h
                      samyaksa.mbuddhaas tadyathoduṃbare pu.spam ||
                      42.11 a`nga bhik.savas tuus..nii.m bhavata vyayadharmaa.h sarvasa.mskaaraa.h||
                      42.12 iyaṃ tatra tathaagatasya pa"scimaa vaacaa ||)

                      Waldschmidt translates the "bhavata" in 42.11 as an indicative ("The monks remained silent" - "Da schwiegen die Moenche alle..") but it is clearly a 2nd pers. pl. imperative, unless it may be a BHS form for third pers. pl. indicative (I don't have my grammar handy).

                      2) The Tibetans have a similar story and translated the last words of the Buddha as: "O Monks, for the time
                      being, do not speak. It is like this: all compounded phenomena are subject to
                      disintegration." They translate in the imperative, but I'm not quite sure why Buddha is saying not to speak (perhaps because he has just asked them three times if they have any doubts and no one spoke up?). The Tibetan is dge slong dag re shig cang ma smra zhig dang/ 'di ltar 'dus byas thams cad ni 'jig pa'i chos can yin te.

                      There are also four Chinese versions which I have tentatively translated (my Chinese is not that great), but they by and large follow the Sanskrit. Since this is a Paali forum I will not burden the group with a translation of each one, unless it is wanted.

                      I hope this helps,

                      Mettaa,

                      Bryan



                      ________________________________
                      From: Ong Yong Peng <palismith@...>
                      To: Pali@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Sun, February 14, 2010 7:24:44 AM
                      Subject: [Pali] Last words of the Buddha...


                      Dear friends,

                      a senior pastor from Singapore recently made unruly comments and insensitive remarks on Buddhism. Pastor Rony Tan, who claims to have a congregation of 12,000+ in Singapore, made a video of a church service speech. In this video, Pastor Tan referred to Buddhism and each time accompanied it with his opinion of the religion. I watched this video, which was first available from Tan's website and subsequently in several video sharing websites. This matter has created a huge outcry within Singapore's civic circles on various fronts. Tan has since apologised for his actions, and promised not to repeat the same mistake again.

                      In this past decade, we have seen almost daily how bigotry and fundamentalism has caused tensions and conflicts within communities and across continents. It is human to err, but irresponsible religious speeches can threaten social stability of a secular country like Singapore. It is not my intention to "talk" about the person on this forum. Only one point I like to discuss: at one point in the speech, Pastor Tan said that when the Buddha was about to pass away, he uttered the last words "I am still seeking the way."

                      I thought I have heard this before, but used on someone else. So, I am curious if Christian evangelicals used "canned messages" in their preaching to win ignorant converts. Is there anyone who knows Christian evangelism methods well enough to comment?

                      Also, "I am still seeking the way." is obviously a quote taken from someone or somewhere and inadequately applied to the Buddha. Please correct me if I am wrong, but I am sure most Buddhists would agree the Buddha's final words are "Transient are all compounded things, strive on with diligence!". This is of course from the Pali tradition. Is there any difference from the Chinese and Tibetan traditions?

                      Thank you.

                      metta,
                      Yong Peng.





                      __________________________________________________________________
                      Looking for the perfect gift? Give the gift of Flickr!

                      http://www.flickr.com/gift/

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • thomaslaw03
                      Hi Frank, ... I will think Maha-brahma is Brahma Baka, not Brahma Sahampati. This is because Brahma Baka in the Brahma Samyutta considers himself as immortal
                      Message 10 of 19 , Feb 15, 2010
                        Hi Frank,

                        >>Is Maha-brahma the same as Brahma Sahampati?

                        I will think Maha-brahma is Brahma Baka, not Brahma Sahampati. This is because Brahma Baka in the Brahma Samyutta considers himself as immortal and his world is permanent. But Brahma Sahampati does not say so; he in the Brahma Samyutta shows him as a supporter of the Buddha and of his teachings. Also, Maha-brahma is more like a title, than a name of a Brahma.

                        Any advice?

                        Thomas Law


                        --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, frank <fcckuan@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Thanks Piya, that's the one. I re-read that section just now,
                        > interesting that the visiting monk has no name, as well as the
                        > Maha-brahma. Is Maha-brahma the same as Brahma Sahampati? The chain of
                        > devas mentioned included
                        > Sakka,
                        >
                        > "The Yama gods said, 'We also don't know...
                        >
                        > "Suyama said, 'I also don't know...
                        >
                        > "Santusita said, 'I also don't know...
                        >
                        > "The Nimmanarati gods said, 'We also don't know...
                        >
                        > "Sunimmita said, 'I also don't know...
                        >
                        > "The Paranimmitavasavatti gods said, 'We also don't know...
                        >
                        > "So the monk approached the god Vasavatti ....
                        > then maha-brahma.
                        >
                        > No mention is made of Brahma sahampati. Is he part of the retinue of
                        > maha-brahma, or is he in fact one and the same as maha-brahma?
                        >
                        > [D. 11] thanissaro version, relevant section is near end
                        > http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/dn/dn.11.0.than.html
                        >
                        > - Frank
                        >
                        > p.s. interesting note, we almost have a harmonic convergence of all the
                        > pali threads from the past week colliding in one message from seemingly
                        > unrelated origins. All I need to do to make it happen is ask, "How do
                        > you pronounce Brahma sahampati in Finnish?" :)
                        >
                        >
                        > On 2/14/2010 4:56 PM, Piya Tan wrote:
                        > > Dear Frank,
                        > >
                        > > You must be thinking of the Keva.d.dha (or Keva.t.ta) Sutta (D 11 = SD 1.7),
                        > > which will be appearing in SD 1, probably out in March.
                        > >
                        > > A very humourous sutta, but with profound teachings.
                        > >
                        > > With metta,
                        > >
                        > > Piya
                        > >
                        > > On Mon, Feb 15, 2010 at 1:56 AM, frank<fcckuan@...> wrote:
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >>
                        > >>
                        > >> There's another sutta I'm thinking of relevant to the preacher's
                        > >> question, but it turns the question and answer back on him. I believe
                        > >> it occurs in Samyutta first or second sections (Devas and devatas).
                        > >> I browsed through access to insight's selections on those sections and
                        > >> didn't see the sutta I'm thinking of.
                        > >>
                        > >> It's the sutta that goes something like this:
                        > >>
                        > >> One of the Buddha's disciples, I don't think it was Mogollana, but a
                        > >> disciple who did have the ability to travel to any deva realm.
                        > >> He tracked down the highest ranking god/brahma, and asked him a tough
                        > >> question, something like, "Is there a place where the four elements have
                        > >> no footing, where light and consciousness have no place to land?" Brahma
                        > >> repsonded with something like, "I am Brahma, the almighty, all powerful.
                        > >> There is nothing that is not within my domain of knowing."
                        > >> Yet he didn't answer the disciple's question.
                        > >> Brahma then did some kind of evasive maneuver, trying to hide in a
                        > >> higher brahma realm or realm of higher meditative attainment, but this
                        > >> was a powerful disciple and for a second time and a third time he
                        > >> tracked him down to ask the question, "is there a place where the 4
                        > >> elements...". And for the 2nd and 3rd time, Brahma responded the same way.
                        > >>
                        > >> The disciple, frustrated, said, "Look here Brahma, I asked you this
                        > >> question and you keep giving me this weak evasive response without
                        > >> answering. What's up with that?"
                        > >>
                        > >> Brahma replies: " Hey man, you made me look bad in front of my guys, the
                        > >> other Brahmas and devas who look up to me by asking me a question I
                        > >> don't know the answer to. Why you hassling me in the first place, when
                        > >> you're a disciple of the Buddha, the all knowing one? He can answer your
                        > >> question." The disciple asks the Buddha, who of course answers it.
                        > >>
                        > >> I just pulled out the CDOB and flipped quickly through the first
                        > >> sections, didn't see it. Maybe the sutta I'm thinking of is in Digha or
                        > >> Majjhima?
                        > >>
                        > >>
                        > >>
                        > >>
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        >
                      • Nina van Gorkom
                        Dear Bryan, Yong Peng and friends, ... N: PTS The Buddha s Last Days , commentary to the Mahaaparinibbaanasutta, translated by Yang-Gyu An. CH VI, 7:
                        Message 11 of 19 , Feb 16, 2010
                          Dear Bryan, Yong Peng and friends,
                          Op 15-feb-2010, om 19:39 heeft Bryan Levman het volgende geschreven:

                          > I am sure most Buddhists would agree the
                          > Buddha's final words >are "Transient are all compounded things, strive
                          > on with diligence!".
                          -------
                          N: PTS 'The Buddha's Last Days', commentary to the
                          Mahaaparinibbaanasutta, translated by Yang-Gyu An.
                          CH VI, 7: <Achieve with vigilance: you should successfully perform
                          all your duties with no absence of mindfulness. Thus did the Blessed
                          One, while lying on his deathbed, give all the advice he had given
                          for forty-five years by putting it into the single word "vigilance".>
                          Footnote to vigilance gives the Pali: appamaada.

                          -------
                          Nina.

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Ong Yong Peng
                          Dear Bryan, thank you. That is excellent. There has been similar works in Asian scholarship too, particularly the Japanese and to a lesser extent the
                          Message 12 of 19 , Feb 16, 2010
                            Dear Bryan,

                            thank you. That is excellent. There has been similar works in Asian scholarship too, particularly the Japanese and to a lesser extent the Taiwanese. Pardon me, but I could not produce a reading list now.

                            This is why it would be good if you can list the four text in the Chinese canon. It would be good too if you give the titles in English and Chinese [scripts] (please use Unicode, not Big5 or GB). At the same time, please also provide the edition of the Chinese canon you refer to. If the four texts are lengthy, say above 10,000 characters, please give more details to locate the specific section containing the Buddha's last words. Thank you.


                            metta,
                            Yong Peng.



                            --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, Bryan Levman wrote:

                            There are seven sources of the Buddha's last words that I am aware of. Two in Indic languages (Pāli and Buddhist Sanskrit), one in the Tibetan Vinaya, and four in the Chinese canon.

                            There are also four Chinese versions which I have tentatively translated (my Chinese is not that great), but they by and large follow the Sanskrit. Since this is a Paali forum I will not burden the group with a translation of each one, unless it is wanted.
                          • Bryan Levman
                            Dear Yong Peng, The four are: 1) 遊行經You xing jing, the Dhiirgaagama of the Dharmagupta school T01n0001_p0026b17║ and following. 2) 佛般泥洹經,
                            Message 13 of 19 , Feb 16, 2010
                              Dear Yong Peng,

                              The four are:

                              1) 遊行經You xing jing, the Dhiirgaagama of the
                              Dharmagupta school
                              T01n0001_p0026b17║ and following.
                              2) 佛般泥洹經, Fo ban ni huan jing, a Parinirvaa.nasuutra
                              T01n0005_p0172c02║
                              and following.
                              3) 般泥洹經, Ban nin huan jing, a Parinirvaa.nasuutra
                              T01n0006_p0188b12║ and following.
                              4) 大般涅槃, Da ban
                              nie pan,a
                              Mahaaparinirvaa.nasuutra
                              T01n0007_p0204c11 ║ and following.

                              I am using the Taisho canon, at http://w3.cbeta.org/.

                              An easy way to find these is to go to the on-line correspondence project at http://www.suttacentral.net/disp_correspondence.php?division_acronym=DN&sutta_number=16.0&sutta_coded_name=Mah%C4%81parinibb%C4%81na&volpage_info=DN%20II%2072&sutta_id=16

                              It is the first four sutras listed. Just click on the first and scroll down a page or two to the reference provided above and you will find it; the reference I have given is the beginning of the final episode where the Buddha asks the monks if they have any questions and then gives his final words


                              Metta, Bryan




                              ________________________________
                              From: Ong Yong Peng <palismith@...>
                              To: Pali@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Tue, February 16, 2010 4:26:08 PM
                              Subject: [Pali] Re: Last words of the Buddha...


                              Dear Bryan,

                              thank you. That is excellent. There has been similar works in Asian scholarship too, particularly the Japanese and to a lesser extent the Taiwanese. Pardon me, but I could not produce a reading list now.

                              This is why it would be good if you can list the four text in the Chinese canon. It would be good too if you give the titles in English and Chinese [scripts] (please use Unicode, not Big5 or GB). At the same time, please also provide the edition of the Chinese canon you refer to. If the four texts are lengthy, say above 10,000 characters, please give more details to locate the specific section containing the Buddha's last words. Thank you.

                              metta,
                              Yong Peng.

                              --- In Pali@yahoogroups. com, Bryan Levman wrote:

                              There are seven sources of the Buddha's last words that I am aware of. Two in Indic languages (Pāli and Buddhist Sanskrit), one in the Tibetan Vinaya, and four in the Chinese canon.

                              There are also four Chinese versions which I have tentatively translated (my Chinese is not that great), but they by and large follow the Sanskrit. Since this is a Paali forum I will not burden the group with a translation of each one, unless it is wanted.





                              __________________________________________________________________
                              The new Internet Explorer® 8 - Faster, safer, easier. Optimized for Yahoo! Get it Now for Free! at http://downloads.yahoo.com/ca/internetexplorer/

                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Ong Yong Peng
                              Dear Bryan,
                              Message 14 of 19 , Feb 19, 2010
                                Dear Bryan,

                                æ¯"丘。無為æ"¾é€¸ã€‚æˆ`以不æ"¾é€¸æ•…。自致正覺。無量眾善。亦ç"±ä¸æ"¾é€¸å¾—。一切萬物無常存者。此是如來末後所說。

                                DÄ«rgha Āgama: 大正新脩大藏ç¶" 第一冊, 佛說長阿含ç¶"卷第四, 遊行ç¶"第二
                                CBETA 電子佛典 V1.45 普及版 T01n0001_p0026b19-21
                                http://w3.cbeta.org/result2/normal/T01/0001_004.htm

                                爾時如來。說此偈已。å`Šè«¸æ¯"丘。汝等當知。一切諸行。皆悉無常。æˆ`今雖是é‡`剛之é«"。亦復不免無常所遷。ç"Ÿæ­»ä¹‹ä¸­æ¥µç‚ºå¯ç•ã€‚汝等宜應勤行精進。速求離此ç"Ÿæ­»ç«å`。此則是æˆ`最後教也。

                                大正新脩大藏ç¶" 第一冊, 大般涅槃ç¶"
                                CBETA 電子佛典 V1.45 普及版 T01n0007_p0204c25-29
                                http://w3.cbeta.org/result2/normal/T01/0007_003.htm

                                Thank you. Thanks to everyone who shared in this discussion.

                                metta,
                                Yong Peng.


                                --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, Bryan Levman wrote:

                                1) 遊行ç¶"You xing jing, the Dhiirgaagama of the Dharmagupta school
                                T01n0001_p0026b17â•` and following.
                                2) 佛般泥洹ç¶", Fo ban ni huan jing, a Parinirvaa.nasuutra
                                T01n0005_p0172c02â•` and following.
                                3) 般泥洹ç¶", Ban nin huan jing, a Parinirvaa.nasuutra
                                T01n0006_p0188b12â•` and following.
                                4) 大般涅槃, Da ban nie pan,a Mahaaparinirvaa.nasuutra
                                T01n0007_p0204c11 â•` and following.
                              • Ong Yong Peng
                                Dear Bryan and friends, I am now more certain that the online text editor for Yahoo! Groups isn t exactly Unicode-friendly. I am redoing this again through
                                Message 15 of 19 , Feb 19, 2010
                                  Dear Bryan and friends,

                                  I am now more certain that the online text editor for Yahoo! Groups isn't
                                  exactly Unicode-friendly. I am redoing this again through Gmail.


                                  比丘。無為放逸。我以不放逸故。自致正覺。無量眾善。亦由不放逸得。一切萬物無常存者。此是如來末後所說。

                                  Dīrgha Āgama: 大正新脩大藏經 第一冊, 佛說長阿含經卷第四, 遊行經第二
                                  CBETA 電子佛典 V1.45 普及版 T01n0001_p0026b19-21
                                  http://w3.cbeta.org/result2/normal/T01/0001_004.htm


                                  爾時如來。說此偈已。告諸比丘。汝等當知。一切諸行。皆悉無常。我今雖是金剛之體。亦復不免無常所遷。生死之中極為可畏。汝等宜應勤行精進。速求離此生死火坑。此則是我最後教也。

                                  大正新脩大藏經 第一冊, 大般涅槃經
                                  CBETA 電子佛典 V1.45 普及版 T01n0007_p0204c25-29
                                  http://w3.cbeta.org/result2/normal/T01/0007_003.htm


                                  metta,
                                  Yong Peng.


                                  On Wed, Feb 17, 2010 at 9:16 AM, Bryan Levman wrote:

                                  >
                                  >
                                  > 1) 遊行經You xing jing, the Dhiirgaagama of the Dharmagupta school
                                  > T01n0001_p0026b17║ and following.
                                  > 2) 佛般泥洹經, Fo ban ni huan jing, a Parinirvaa.nasuutra
                                  > T01n0005_p0172c02║and following.
                                  > 3) 般泥洹經, Ban nin huan jing, a Parinirvaa.nasuutra
                                  > T01n0006_p0188b12║ and following.
                                  > 4) 大般涅槃, Da ban nie pan, a Mahaaparinirvaa.nasuutra
                                  > T01n0007_p0204c11 ║ and following.
                                  >


                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • Bryan Levman
                                  Hi Yong Ping, Whatever your wrote is not coming through for me. See below, Metta, Bryan ________________________________ From: Ong Yong Peng
                                  Message 16 of 19 , Feb 20, 2010
                                    Hi Yong Ping,

                                    Whatever your wrote is not coming through for me. See below,

                                    Metta, Bryan




                                    ________________________________
                                    From: Ong Yong Peng <palismith@...>
                                    To: Pali@yahoogroups.com
                                    Sent: Fri, February 19, 2010 7:45:16 PM
                                    Subject: Re: [Pali] Re: Last words of the Buddha...


                                    Dear Bryan and friends,

                                    I am now more certain that the online text editor for Yahoo! Groups isn't
                                    exactly Unicode-friendly. I am redoing this again through Gmail.

                                    比丘。無為放逸。我以不放逸故。自致正覺。無量眾善。亦由不放逸得。一切萬物無常存者。此是如來末後所說。

                                    Dīrgha Āgama: 大正新脩大藏經 第一冊, 佛說長阿含經卷第四, 遊行經第二
                                    CBETA 電子佛典 V1.45 普及版 T01n0001_p0026b19- 21
                                    http://w3.cbeta org/result2/ normal/T01/ 0001_004. htm

                                    爾時如來。說此偈已。告諸比丘。汝等當知。一切諸行。皆悉無常。我今雖是金剛之體。亦復不免無常所遷。生死之中極為可畏。汝等宜應勤行精進。速求離此生死火坑。此則是我最後教也。

                                    大正新脩大藏經 第一冊, 大般涅槃經
                                    CBETA 電子佛典 V1.45 普及版 T01n0007_p0204c25- 29
                                    http://w3.cbeta org/result2/ normal/T01/ 0007_003. htm

                                    metta,
                                    Yong Peng.

                                    On Wed, Feb 17, 2010 at 9:16 AM, Bryan Levman wrote:

                                    >
                                    >
                                    > 1) 遊行經You xing jing, the Dhiirgaagama of the Dharmagupta school
                                    > T01n0001_p0026b17║ and following.
                                    > 2) 佛般泥洹經, Fo ban ni huan jing, a Parinirvaa.nasuutra
                                    > T01n0005_p0172c02║and following.
                                    > 3) 般泥洹經, Ban nin huan jing, a Parinirvaa.nasuutra
                                    > T01n0006_p0188b12║ and following.
                                    > 4) 大般涅槃, Da ban nie pan, a Mahaaparinirvaa. nasuutra
                                    > T01n0007_p0204c11 ║ and following.
                                    >

                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                                    __________________________________________________________________
                                    Make your browsing faster, safer, and easier with the new Internet Explorer® 8. Optimized for Yahoo! Get it Now for Free! at http://downloads.yahoo.com/ca/internetexplorer/

                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • Ong Yong Peng
                                    Dear Bryan, I try to repost again. If it still doesn t work, please visit the email archive. Thank you. 比丘。 無為放逸。 我以不放逸故。
                                    Message 17 of 19 , Feb 20, 2010
                                      Dear Bryan,

                                      I try to repost again. If it still doesn't work, please visit the email
                                      archive. Thank you.


                                      比丘。 無為放逸。 我以不放逸故。 自致正覺。 無量眾善。 亦由不放逸得。 一切萬物無常存者。 此是如來末後所說。

                                      Dīrgha Āgama: 大正新脩大藏經 第一冊, 佛說長阿含經卷第四, 遊行經第二
                                      CBETA 電子佛典 V1.45 普及版 T01n0001_p0026b19-21
                                      http://w3.cbeta.org/result2/normal/T01/0001_004.htm


                                      爾時如來。 說此偈已。 告諸比丘。 汝等當知。 一切諸行。 皆悉無常。 我今雖是金剛之體。 亦復不免無常所遷。 生死之中極為可畏。 汝等宜應勤行精進。
                                      速求離此生死火坑。 此則是我最後教也。

                                      大正新脩大藏經 第一冊, 大般涅槃經
                                      CBETA 電子佛典 V1.45 普及版 T01n0007_p0204c25-29
                                      http://w3.cbeta.org/result2/normal/T01/0007_003.htm



                                      email archive: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Pali/message/14476

                                      metta,
                                      Yong Peng.



                                      On Sun, Feb 21, 2010 at 1:04 AM, Bryan Levman wrote:

                                      > Whatever your wrote is not coming through for me.
                                      >


                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    • frank
                                      Hi Yong Peng, Bryan. All the chinese characters in quoted text at bottom show up fine in email. Lennart solved this mystery recently. I just tried to find his
                                      Message 18 of 19 , Feb 20, 2010
                                        Hi Yong Peng, Bryan.
                                        All the chinese characters in quoted text at bottom show up fine in
                                        email.
                                        Lennart solved this mystery recently. I just tried to find his
                                        message on yahoo archive, couldn't find it, so I checked my personal
                                        email archive and realized Lennart had responded offlist. Here's the fix
                                        he found:

                                        ==================================================
                                        Hi Yong Peng, Frank

                                        Please find attached a screenshot ... I saw that my test messages would
                                        go through correctly and I could read them properly but when I went to
                                        the yahoo group website, I saw all these UTF-8 characters. So I did a
                                        little research on it and found that one needs to change one's browser
                                        setting to display the yahoo group's page as UTF-8 encoded (the
                                        screenshot shows how to do it with Chrome, but other browsers can do
                                        that too). Now, not only do I get correctly encoded emails but I can
                                        also see the messages on the yahoo group in the correct format.

                                        The only problem I can see, however, is when someone whose (older) email
                                        program do not support UTF-8 replies on an email and thus his email
                                        might contain wrongly (double) encoded characters...
                                        ===================================================

                                        The problem is even though we know the cause and how to fix it, it's not
                                        intuitive and also easy to forget to do even though we know about it.
                                        In other words, expect this situation to happen regularly. Someone posts
                                        some unicode pali/chinese through yahoogroups forgetting to set browser
                                        to utf-8. The intended recipient wonders why the character shows up
                                        garbage, checks the yahoo archive (without setting browser settings to
                                        utf-8) and BOTH correct unicode and incorrect unicode will show up as
                                        garbage text.

                                        A simple solution would be to reconfigure the pali list to support HTML,
                                        then cut and paste between windows of unicode pali/chinese will show up
                                        correctly whether you send or receive it from either the yahoo archive
                                        or your personal email.

                                        I've actually proposed the HTML solution at least 3 times already, and
                                        was met with the sound of crickets chirping (i.e. no response). During
                                        the Buddha's time, when the Buddha or monks were asked 3 times and met
                                        with silence, that was the custom meaning, "Yes."

                                        -Frank


                                        On 2/20/2010 8:25 AM, Ong Yong Peng wrote:
                                        >
                                        > Dear Bryan,
                                        >
                                        > I try to repost again. If it still doesn't work, please visit the email
                                        > archive. Thank you.
                                        >
                                        > 比丘。 無為放逸。 我以不放逸故。 自致正覺。 無量眾善。 亦由不放逸得。
                                        > 一切萬物無常存者。 此是如來末後所說。
                                        >
                                        > Dīrgha Āgama: 大正新脩大藏經 第一冊, 佛說長阿含經卷第四, 遊行經第二
                                        > CBETA 電子佛典 V1.45 普及版 T01n0001_p0026b19-21
                                        > http://w3.cbeta.org/result2/normal/T01/0001_004.htm
                                        > <http://w3.cbeta.org/result2/normal/T01/0001_004.htm>
                                        >
                                        > 爾時如來。 說此偈已。 告諸比丘。 汝等當知。 一切諸行。 皆悉無常。 我今
                                        > 雖是金剛之體。 亦復不免無常所遷。 生死之中極為可畏。汝等宜應勤行精進。
                                        > 速求離此生死火坑。 此則是我最後教也。
                                        >
                                        > 大正新脩大藏經 第一冊, 大般涅槃經
                                        > CBETA 電子佛典 V1.45 普及版 T01n0007_p0204c25-29
                                        > http://w3.cbeta.org/result2/normal/T01/0007_003.htm
                                        > <http://w3.cbeta.org/result2/normal/T01/0007_003.htm>
                                        >
                                        > email archive: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Pali/message/14476
                                        > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Pali/message/14476>
                                        >
                                        > metta,
                                        > Yong Peng.
                                        >
                                        > On Sun, Feb 21, 2010 at 1:04 AM, Bryan Levman wrote:
                                        >
                                        > > Whatever your wrote is not coming through for me.
                                        > >
                                        >
                                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                        >
                                        >



                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      • Bryan Levman
                                        thanks Frank, I set it at UTF-8 and it s working now, Bryan ________________________________ From: frank To: Pali@yahoogroups.com Sent:
                                        Message 19 of 19 , Feb 20, 2010
                                          thanks Frank, I set it at UTF-8 and it's working now, Bryan





                                          ________________________________
                                          From: frank <fcckuan@...>
                                          To: Pali@yahoogroups.com
                                          Sent: Sat, February 20, 2010 1:42:44 PM
                                          Subject: unicode and yahoo archive Re: [Pali] Re: Last words of the Buddha...


                                          Hi Yong Peng, Bryan.
                                          All the chinese characters in quoted text at bottom show up fine in
                                          email.
                                          Lennart solved this mystery recently. I just tried to find his
                                          message on yahoo archive, couldn't find it, so I checked my personal
                                          email archive and realized Lennart had responded offlist. Here's the fix
                                          he found:

                                          ============ ========= ========= ========= ========= ==
                                          Hi Yong Peng, Frank

                                          Please find attached a screenshot ... I saw that my test messages would
                                          go through correctly and I could read them properly but when I went to
                                          the yahoo group website, I saw all these UTF-8 characters. So I did a
                                          little research on it and found that one needs to change one's browser
                                          setting to display the yahoo group's page as UTF-8 encoded (the
                                          screenshot shows how to do it with Chrome, but other browsers can do
                                          that too). Now, not only do I get correctly encoded emails but I can
                                          also see the messages on the yahoo group in the correct format.

                                          The only problem I can see, however, is when someone whose (older) email
                                          program do not support UTF-8 replies on an email and thus his email
                                          might contain wrongly (double) encoded characters.. .
                                          ============ ========= ========= ========= ========= ===

                                          The problem is even though we know the cause and how to fix it, it's not
                                          intuitive and also easy to forget to do even though we know about it.
                                          In other words, expect this situation to happen regularly. Someone posts
                                          some unicode pali/chinese through yahoogroups forgetting to set browser
                                          to utf-8. The intended recipient wonders why the character shows up
                                          garbage, checks the yahoo archive (without setting browser settings to
                                          utf-8) and BOTH correct unicode and incorrect unicode will show up as
                                          garbage text.

                                          A simple solution would be to reconfigure the pali list to support HTML,
                                          then cut and paste between windows of unicode pali/chinese will show up
                                          correctly whether you send or receive it from either the yahoo archive
                                          or your personal email.

                                          I've actually proposed the HTML solution at least 3 times already, and
                                          was met with the sound of crickets chirping (i.e. no response). During
                                          the Buddha's time, when the Buddha or monks were asked 3 times and met
                                          with silence, that was the custom meaning, "Yes."

                                          -Frank

                                          On 2/20/2010 8:25 AM, Ong Yong Peng wrote:
                                          >
                                          > Dear Bryan,
                                          >
                                          > I try to repost again. If it still doesn't work, please visit the email
                                          > archive. Thank you.
                                          >
                                          > 比丘。 無為放逸。 我以不放逸故。 自致正覺。 無量眾善。 亦由不放逸得。
                                          > 一切萬物無常存者。 此是如來末後所說。
                                          >
                                          > Dīrgha Āgama: 大正新脩大藏經 第一冊, 佛說長阿含經卷第四, 遊行經第二
                                          > CBETA 電子佛典 V1.45 普及版 T01n0001_p0026b19- 21
                                          > http://w3.cbeta. org/result2/ normal/T01/ 0001_004. htm
                                          > <http://w3.cbeta. org/result2/ normal/T01/ 0001_004. htm>
                                          >
                                          > 爾時如來。 說此偈已。 告諸比丘。 汝等當知。 一切諸行。 皆悉無常。 我今
                                          > 雖是金剛之體。 亦復不免無常所遷。 生死之中極為可畏。汝等宜應勤行精進。
                                          > 速求離此生死火坑。 此則是我最後教也。
                                          >
                                          > 大正新脩大藏經 第一冊, 大般涅槃經
                                          > CBETA 電子佛典 V1.45 普及版 T01n0007_p0204c25- 29
                                          > http://w3.cbeta. org/result2/ normal/T01/ 0007_003. htm
                                          > <http://w3.cbeta. org/result2/ normal/T01/ 0007_003. htm>
                                          >
                                          > email archive: http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Pali/ message/14476
                                          > <http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Pali/ message/14476>
                                          >
                                          > metta,
                                          > Yong Peng.
                                          >
                                          > On Sun, Feb 21, 2010 at 1:04 AM, Bryan Levman wrote:
                                          >
                                          > > Whatever your wrote is not coming through for me.
                                          > >
                                          >
                                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                          >
                                          >

                                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





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