Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

A message from Pune

Expand Messages
  • ashinpan
    Dear members, I am writing this message from Pune, India just to let you share some of my experiences. After arriving here on 31st Jan., I met Prof. Deokar at
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 9, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      Dear members,

      I am writing this message from Pune, India just to let you share some of my experiences.

      After arriving here on 31st Jan., I met Prof. Deokar at his office on the next day. This was the first time I saw a handicapped person working in a highly responsible position, and I have been really impressed. With all the phone calls coming in, with so many documents to sign on, and with many people (including myself) demanding to see and speak to him, he has managed all these things admirably, just like a normal person.

      I gave a guest lecture at the Pali department on Feb. 3rd. I was the speaker for this year in the Bhiksu Jagdish Kasyap Memorial Lecture series. My lecture is titled "The earliest three suttas: Their relevance to Vinaya and Monastic Life", and it is only an elaboration of the section 3.1 of my paper "Was the Buddha obliged to observe the Vinaya rules?", which I have uploaded to this list as a file named buddha_vinaya.pdf.

      On the same day, I also transferred the books that my Korean students had donated to the Pali department. Those include one set of the Encyclopedia of Buddhism (Vol I-VII plus 2 fascicles of the Vol VIII) and other miscellaneous works in Buddhist Studies.

      The Pali department of the University of Pune is a young one, having been founded in 2006. As usual with the new departments, the problem is space. The Pali department does not have its own office yet; Prof. Deokar's office is also serving as the Pali department office. They have also to share the lecture halls with the department of Sanskrit and Prakrit languages. Even now, they don't have a proper shrine for one big marble Buddha statue donated by one Burmese monk; so the Buddha statue has to stay locked up in a store room. Prof. Deokar joked that the Buddha statue would achieve liberation only when they can get proper space for it!

      And there is only one lecturer under Prof. Deokar, and he hasn't finished his doctorate yet. So teachers from the department of Sanskrit and Prakrit languages have to help them run the undergraduate and graduate courses.

      with metta

      Ven. Pandita
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.