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[Pali] Dhammacakkappavattanasutta, no 2, commentary.

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  • Nina van Gorkom
    Dear friends, no 2: Summary of the Commentary to the Dhammacakka pavattana sutta. The commentary explains the name Isipatana. Isi is a wise hermit and patana
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 27, 2009
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      Dear friends,

      no 2: Summary of the Commentary to the Dhammacakka pavattana sutta.

      The commentary explains the name Isipatana. Isi is a wise hermit and
      patana means falling, coming down (patati). This is the place where
      hermits and Pacceka Buddhas (Silent Buddhas) would come down after
      their aerial journey. It was a refuge for deer (migadaaya). Pacceka
      Buddhas and hermits, after emerging from nirodhasamaapatti, the
      attainment of the cessation of perception and feeling, during one
      week (sattaaha), and after having washed their face in the lake of
      Anodatta , would travel through the air, descend here and assemble to
      keep uposatha, vigil day, and non-vigil days. They would come down
      here and alight again. That is why the place was called isipatana.

      Text Pali: 1081. Dutiyassa pa.thame baaraa.nasiyanti eva.mnaamake
      nagare. Isipatane migadaayeti isiina.m patanuppatanavasena
      eva.mladdhanaame migaana.m abhayadaanavasena dinnattaa
      migadaayasa`nkhaate aaraame. Ettha hi uppannuppannaa sabba~n~nuisayo
      patanti, dhammacakkappavattanattha.m nisiidantiiti attho.
      Nandamuulakapabbhaarato sattaahaccayena nirodhasamaapattito
      vu.t.thitaa anotattadahe katamukhadhovanaadikiccaa aakaasena
      aagantvaa paccekabuddhaisayopettha otara.navasena patanti,
      uposathattha~nca anuposathattha~nca sannipatanti, gandhamaadana.m
      pa.tigacchantaapi tatova uppatantiiti iminaa isiina.m
      patanuppatanavasena ta.m "isipatana"nti vuccati.
      -----------
      Nina.



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Ong Yong Peng
      Dear Nina, thank you for your generous works. This occasionally opens up and leads to discussions which may further enhance our appreciation of Buddhism. Given
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 28, 2009
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        Dear Nina,

        thank you for your generous works. This occasionally opens up and leads to discussions which may further enhance our appreciation of Buddhism. Given our international membership with a large variety of backgrounds, through sharing and discussion, we should allow a deeper exploration of the facts related to the teachings, only to be constrained by time, space and our limited knowledge.

        If you do not object, allow me to add a new dimension to sutta study.

        Today, historians relate Isipatana to the modern day Sarnath, a small village in the northeastern state of Uttar Pradesh in India. According to history, King Asoka built a massive stupa to mark the spot where the Buddha preached this sutta. The Dhamekha Stupa, as it is known, had been vandalised and repaired over time, but it still retains many artistic carvings of Gupta origin, as well as inscriptions in Brahmi script. It is the only standing structure among the ruins of the plundered site. The name dhamekha seems to be a distorted form of dhammacakka, meaning the wheel of Dhamma.


        metta,
        Yong Peng.
      • Nina van Gorkom
        DEar Yong Peng, ... N: Anagarika Dharmapala from Sri Lanka (born 1864) has done a great deal for the restoration of this holy site. When he first came here the
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 28, 2009
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          DEar Yong Peng,
          Op 28-okt-2009, om 13:40 heeft Ong Yong Peng het volgende geschreven:

          > The Dhamekha Stupa, as it is known, had been vandalised and
          > repaired over time, but it still retains many artistic carvings of
          > Gupta origin, as well as inscriptions in Brahmi script. It is the
          > only standing structure among the ruins of the plundered site.
          -------
          N: Anagarika Dharmapala from Sri Lanka (born 1864) has done a great
          deal for the restoration of this holy site. When he first came here
          the place was a wilderness with wild animals.
          I visited this place many times and my husband and I are impressed
          seeing that the Indian Authorities keep this place meticulously. Each
          time there are new excavations of old buildings, the archeological
          department is doing great work. We also saw the remnants of an Asoka
          pillar with a gate around it. There is just the base in three pieces.
          The top consisting of four lions is kept in the museum. The place
          where the Buddha met the group of five is commemorated by a stupa
          nearby.
          The monks chant the Dhammacakkappavattanasutta around six in the
          evening, in the Mulagandhakuty Vihara where relics of the Buddha are
          being kept deep down in the cellar.

          ---------
          Nina.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Ong Yong Peng
          Dear Nina, thank you for sharing your travel experiences. That is nice. metta, Yong Peng.
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 4, 2009
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            Dear Nina,

            thank you for sharing your travel experiences. That is nice.


            metta,
            Yong Peng.
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