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sabba.m me khamatiiti

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  • Dipa .
    In MN 74 Diighanaka the phrase sabba.m me khamatiiti is used. I am trying to find a definition for khamatiiti. I find in the CPED khamati: to be patient; to
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 12, 2009
      In MN 74 Diighanaka the phrase sabba.m me khamatiiti is used.
      I am trying to find a definition for khamatiiti. I find in the CPED
      khamati: to be patient; to endure; to forbear; to pardon. Thanissaro Bhikkhu
      translates sabba.m me khamatiiti "All is pleasing to me" In the Wisdom Pub.
      it is translated as "Everything is acceptable to me."
      Can anyone point me to a resource where pleasing is given as a definition of
      this word? The word pleasing helps to tie the Buddha's response to
      Diighanaka's statements in a way that makes more sense than the word
      acceptable, but I want to find how the word pleasing is arrived at. If
      there is an online resource you can point me to for finding this I would
      greatly appreciate it.

      thanks,
      Diipaa


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • DC Wijeratna
      I think khamati is to accept things as they are. Leave the environment as it is; do not interfere. D. G. D. C. Wijeratna ________________________________ From:
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 13, 2009
        I think khamati is to accept things as they are. Leave the environment as it is; do not interfere. D. G. D. C. Wijeratna




        ________________________________
        From: Dipa . <dipaeightprecepter@...>
        To: Pali Group <pali@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Thursday, March 12, 2009 4:51:54 PM
        Subject: [Pali] sabba.m me khamatiiti


        In MN 74 Diighanaka the phrase sabba.m me khamatiiti is used.
        I am trying to find a definition for khamatiiti. I find in the CPED
        khamati: to be patient; to endure; to forbear; to pardon. Thanissaro Bhikkhu
        translates sabba.m me khamatiiti "All is pleasing to me" In the Wisdom Pub.
        it is translated as "Everything is acceptable to me."
        Can anyone point me to a resource where pleasing is given as a definition of
        this word? The word pleasing helps to tie the Buddha's response to
        Diighanaka's statements in a way that makes more sense than the word
        acceptable, but I want to find how the word pleasing is arrived at. If
        there is an online resource you can point me to for finding this I would
        greatly appreciate it.

        thanks,
        Diipaa

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • James Whelan
        The primary meaning of khamati (Sanskrit k.samate) is to bear, endure, be patient. A further meaning in both Pali and Sanskrit is to please . For the Pali,
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 15, 2009
          The primary meaning of khamati (Sanskrit k.samate) is to bear, endure, be patient. A further meaning in both Pali and Sanskrit is 'to please'. For the Pali, see the new PTS Dictionary (Cone, 2001), under khamati - entry no. 3, where several citations are given showing khamati with that meaning.

          You can usually tell the difference by context and logic because when it means 'to endure', 'be patient', the subject of the verb is usually a sentient being. When it means 'to please', the subject of the verb is often a non-sentient being - the thing that pleases the person. But not always - e,g, 'ti.n.nam puggalaanam... katamo te puggalo khamati'? ...' of those people, which person pleases you, i.e. seems best to you? Here it is evident that a person is being asked to pass a moral judgment on who 'pleases', i.e. seems best. It is the context that makes it clear.that the speaker is talking about pleasing and not enduring.

          I agree with Wijeratna in that khamati does include the meaning that he gives for it, but it does also include endurance as in the endurance of suffering. All the more so when it is in the negative, meaning that someone finds something 'unendurable'. That meaning extends far beyond non-interference.

          Metta
          James


          ----- Original Message -----
          From: DC Wijeratna
          To: Pali@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Saturday, March 14, 2009 4:09 AM
          Subject: Re: [Pali] sabba.m me khamatiiti


          I think khamati is to accept things as they are. Leave the environment as it is; do not interfere. D. G. D. C. Wijeratna

          ________________________________
          From: Dipa . <dipaeightprecepter@...>
          To: Pali Group <pali@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Thursday, March 12, 2009 4:51:54 PM
          Subject: [Pali] sabba.m me khamatiiti

          In MN 74 Diighanaka the phrase sabba.m me khamatiiti is used.
          I am trying to find a definition for khamatiiti. I find in the CPED
          khamati: to be patient; to endure; to forbear; to pardon. Thanissaro Bhikkhu
          translates sabba.m me khamatiiti "All is pleasing to me" In the Wisdom Pub.
          it is translated as "Everything is acceptable to me."
          Can anyone point me to a resource where pleasing is given as a definition of
          this word? The word pleasing helps to tie the Buddha's response to
          Diighanaka's statements in a way that makes more sense than the word
          acceptable, but I want to find how the word pleasing is arrived at. If
          there is an online resource you can point me to for finding this I would
          greatly appreciate it.

          thanks,
          Diipaa

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Dipa .
          Thank you James, So, All is pleasing to me is a alternative translation for sabba.m me khamatiitiI appreciate your letting me know where this definition can
          Message 4 of 7 , Mar 15, 2009
            Thank you James,
            So, "All is pleasing to me" is a alternative translation for
            sabba.m me khamatiitiI appreciate your letting me know where this definition
            can be found.
            I searched the internet for the Dictionary of Pali by Margaret Cone
            and found that it is out of stock at Pariyatti where U.S. customers are
            directed to order from by PTS. So, it doesn't seem to be available at
            this time.

            thanks,
            Diipaa
            Home: 417-864-4559
            Buddhist Group web site: http://www.geocities.com/sisterdipa/index.html
            Buddhist Group e-list http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bowonWalnutSt/
            Audio Talks http://groups.google.com/group/discourses-of-the-buddha
            http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sutta.html
            Kalamas, when you yourselves know: 'These things are good; these things are
            not blamable; these things are praised by the wise; undertaken and observed,
            these things lead to benefit and happiness,' enter on and abide in them. AN
            3.65


            On Sun, Mar 15, 2009 at 9:49 AM, James Whelan
            <james.whelan5@...>wrote:

            > The primary meaning of khamati (Sanskrit k.samate) is to bear, endure,
            > be patient. A further meaning in both Pali and Sanskrit is 'to please'. For
            > the Pali, see the new PTS Dictionary (Cone, 2001), under khamati - entry no.
            > 3, where several citations are given showing khamati with that meaning.
            >
            > You can usually tell the difference by context and logic because when it
            > means 'to endure', 'be patient', the subject of the verb is usually a
            > sentient being. When it means 'to please', the subject of the verb is often
            > a non-sentient being - the thing that pleases the person. But not always -
            > e,g, 'ti.n.nam puggalaanam... katamo te puggalo khamati'? ...' of those
            > people, which person pleases you, i.e. seems best to you? Here it is evident
            > that a person is being asked to pass a moral judgment on who 'pleases', i.e.
            > seems best. It is the context that makes it clear.that the speaker is
            > talking about pleasing and not enduring.
            >
            > I agree with Wijeratna in that khamati does include the meaning that he
            > gives for it, but it does also include endurance as in the endurance of
            > suffering. All the more so when it is in the negative, meaning that someone
            > finds something 'unendurable'. That meaning extends far beyond
            > non-interference.
            >
            > Metta
            > James
            >
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: DC Wijeratna
            > To: Pali@yahoogroups.com <Pali%40yahoogroups.com>
            > Sent: Saturday, March 14, 2009 4:09 AM
            > Subject: Re: [Pali] sabba.m me khamatiiti
            >
            > I think khamati is to accept things as they are. Leave the environment as
            > it is; do not interfere. D. G. D. C. Wijeratna
            >
            > ________________________________
            > From: Dipa . <dipaeightprecepter@...<dipaeightprecepter%40gmail.com>
            > >
            > To: Pali Group <pali@yahoogroups.com <pali%40yahoogroups.com>>
            > Sent: Thursday, March 12, 2009 4:51:54 PM
            > Subject: [Pali] sabba.m me khamatiiti
            >
            > In MN 74 Diighanaka the phrase sabba.m me khamatiiti is used.
            > I am trying to find a definition for khamatiiti. I find in the CPED
            > khamati: to be patient; to endure; to forbear; to pardon. Thanissaro
            > Bhikkhu
            > translates sabba.m me khamatiiti "All is pleasing to me" In the Wisdom Pub.
            > it is translated as "Everything is acceptable to me."
            > Can anyone point me to a resource where pleasing is given as a definition
            > of
            > this word? The word pleasing helps to tie the Buddha's response to
            > Diighanaka's statements in a way that makes more sense than the word
            > acceptable, but I want to find how the word pleasing is arrived at. If
            > there is an online resource you can point me to for finding this I would
            > greatly appreciate it.
            >
            > thanks,
            > Diipaa
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • D.C. Wijeratna
            It all depends on what one means by pleasing. Logically, all is pleasing to me would mean there is nothing in somebody s experience that is displeasing (or
            Message 5 of 7 , Mar 15, 2009
              It all depends on what one means by pleasing. Logically, 'all is pleasing to
              me' would mean there is nothing in somebody's experience that is displeasing
              (or not pleasing). Such a situation is improbable. In the case of an
              arahant. It is equanimity. So one can say to accept things with equanimity.



              D. G. D. C. Wijeratna



              _____

              From: Pali@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Pali@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dipa .
              Sent: Monday, March 16, 2009 1:31 AM
              To: Pali@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [Pali] sabba.m me khamatiiti



              Thank you James,
              So, "All is pleasing to me" is a alternative translation for
              sabba.m me khamatiitiI appreciate your letting me know where this definition
              can be found.
              I searched the internet for the Dictionary of Pali by Margaret Cone
              and found that it is out of stock at Pariyatti where U.S. customers are
              directed to order from by PTS. So, it doesn't seem to be available at
              this time.

              thanks,
              Diipaa
              Home: 417-864-4559
              Buddhist Group web site: http://www.geocitie
              <http://www.geocities.com/sisterdipa/index.html> s.com/sisterdipa/index.html
              Buddhist Group e-list http://groups.
              <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bowonWalnutSt/>
              yahoo.com/group/bowonWalnutSt/
              Audio Talks http://groups.
              <http://groups.google.com/group/discourses-of-the-buddha>
              google.com/group/discourses-of-the-buddha
              http://www.accessto <http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sutta.html>
              insight.org/tipitaka/sutta.html
              Kalamas, when you yourselves know: 'These things are good; these things are
              not blamable; these things are praised by the wise; undertaken and observed,
              these things lead to benefit and happiness,' enter on and abide in them. AN
              3.65

              On Sun, Mar 15, 2009 at 9:49 AM, James Whelan
              <james.whelan5@ <mailto:james.whelan5%40btinternet.com>
              btinternet.com>wrote:

              > The primary meaning of khamati (Sanskrit k.samate) is to bear, endure,
              > be patient. A further meaning in both Pali and Sanskrit is 'to please'.
              For
              > the Pali, see the new PTS Dictionary (Cone, 2001), under khamati - entry
              no.
              > 3, where several citations are given showing khamati with that meaning.
              >
              > You can usually tell the difference by context and logic because when it
              > means 'to endure', 'be patient', the subject of the verb is usually a
              > sentient being. When it means 'to please', the subject of the verb is
              often
              > a non-sentient being - the thing that pleases the person. But not always -
              > e,g, 'ti.n.nam puggalaanam... katamo te puggalo khamati'? ...' of those
              > people, which person pleases you, i.e. seems best to you? Here it is
              evident
              > that a person is being asked to pass a moral judgment on who 'pleases',
              i.e.
              > seems best. It is the context that makes it clear.that the speaker is
              > talking about pleasing and not enduring.
              >
              > I agree with Wijeratna in that khamati does include the meaning that he
              > gives for it, but it does also include endurance as in the endurance of
              > suffering. All the more so when it is in the negative, meaning that
              someone
              > finds something 'unendurable'. That meaning extends far beyond
              > non-interference.
              >
              > Metta
              > James
              >
              >
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: DC Wijeratna
              > To: Pali@yahoogroups. <mailto:Pali%40yahoogroups.com> com
              <Pali%40yahoogroups.com>
              > Sent: Saturday, March 14, 2009 4:09 AM
              > Subject: Re: [Pali] sabba.m me khamatiiti
              >
              > I think khamati is to accept things as they are. Leave the environment as
              > it is; do not interfere. D. G. D. C. Wijeratna
              >
              > ________________________________
              > From: Dipa . <dipaeightprecepter@ <mailto:dipaeightprecepter%40gmail.com>
              gmail.com<dipaeightprecepter%40gmail.com>
              > >
              > To: Pali Group <pali@yahoogroups. <mailto:pali%40yahoogroups.com> com
              <pali%40yahoogroups.com>>
              > Sent: Thursday, March 12, 2009 4:51:54 PM
              > Subject: [Pali] sabba.m me khamatiiti
              >
              > In MN 74 Diighanaka the phrase sabba.m me khamatiiti is used.
              > I am trying to find a definition for khamatiiti. I find in the CPED
              > khamati: to be patient; to endure; to forbear; to pardon. Thanissaro
              > Bhikkhu
              > translates sabba.m me khamatiiti "All is pleasing to me" In the Wisdom
              Pub.
              > it is translated as "Everything is acceptable to me."
              > Can anyone point me to a resource where pleasing is given as a definition
              > of
              > this word? The word pleasing helps to tie the Buddha's response to
              > Diighanaka's statements in a way that makes more sense than the word
              > acceptable, but I want to find how the word pleasing is arrived at. If
              > there is an online resource you can point me to for finding this I would
              > greatly appreciate it.
              >
              > thanks,
              > Diipaa
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Dipa .
              I will paste in below my original post to the list which explains where I got this phrase and why I am asking. This should help to clarify. In MN 74
              Message 6 of 7 , Mar 16, 2009
                I will paste in below my original post to the list which explains where
                I got this phrase and why I am asking. This should help to clarify.
                In MN 74 Diighanaka the phrase sabba.m me khamatiiti is used.
                I am trying to find a definition for khamatiiti. I find in the CPED
                khamati: to be patient; to endure; to forbear; to pardon. Thanissaro Bhikkhu
                translates sabba.m me khamatiiti "All is pleasing to me" In the Wisdom Pub.
                it is translated as "Everything is acceptable to me."
                Can anyone point me to a resource where pleasing is given as a definition of
                this word? The word pleasing helps to tie the Buddha's response to
                Diighanaka's statements in a way that makes more sense than the word
                acceptable, but I want to find how the word pleasing is arrived at. If
                there is an online resource you can point me to for finding this I would
                greatly appreciate it.

                thanks,
                Diipaa
                Home: 417-864-4559
                Buddhist Group web site: http://www.geocities.com/sisterdipa/index.html
                Buddhist Group e-list http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bowonWalnutSt/
                Audio Talks http://groups.google.com/group/discourses-of-the-buddha
                http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sutta.html
                Kalamas, when you yourselves know: 'These things are good; these things are
                not blamable; these things are praised by the wise; undertaken and observed,
                these things lead to benefit and happiness,' enter on and abide in them. AN
                3.65


                On Sun, Mar 15, 2009 at 8:41 PM, D.C. Wijeratna <dcwijeratna@...>wrote:

                > It all depends on what one means by pleasing. Logically, 'all is
                > pleasing to
                > me' would mean there is nothing in somebody's experience that is
                > displeasing
                > (or not pleasing). Such a situation is improbable. In the case of an
                > arahant. It is equanimity. So one can say to accept things with equanimity.
                >
                >
                > D. G. D. C. Wijeratna
                >
                > _____
                >
                > From: Pali@yahoogroups.com <Pali%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:
                > Pali@yahoogroups.com <Pali%40yahoogroups.com>] On Behalf Of Dipa .
                > Sent: Monday, March 16, 2009 1:31 AM
                > To: Pali@yahoogroups.com <Pali%40yahoogroups.com>
                > Subject: Re: [Pali] sabba.m me khamatiiti
                >
                > Thank you James,
                > So, "All is pleasing to me" is a alternative translation for
                > sabba.m me khamatiitiI appreciate your letting me know where this
                > definition
                > can be found.
                > I searched the internet for the Dictionary of Pali by Margaret Cone
                > and found that it is out of stock at Pariyatti where U.S. customers are
                > directed to order from by PTS. So, it doesn't seem to be available at
                > this time.
                >
                > thanks,
                > Diipaa
                > Home: 417-864-4559
                > Buddhist Group web site: http://www.geocitie
                > <http://www.geocities.com/sisterdipa/index.html>
                > s.com/sisterdipa/index.html
                > Buddhist Group e-list http://groups.
                > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bowonWalnutSt/>
                > yahoo.com/group/bowonWalnutSt/
                > Audio Talks http://groups.
                > <http://groups.google.com/group/discourses-of-the-buddha>
                > google.com/group/discourses-of-the-buddha
                > http://www.accessto <http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sutta.html>
                > insight.org/tipitaka/sutta.html
                > Kalamas, when you yourselves know: 'These things are good; these things are
                > not blamable; these things are praised by the wise; undertaken and
                > observed,
                > these things lead to benefit and happiness,' enter on and abide in them. AN
                > 3.65
                >
                > On Sun, Mar 15, 2009 at 9:49 AM, James Whelan
                > <james.whelan5@ <mailto:james.whelan5%40btinternet.com<james.whelan5%2540btinternet.com>
                > >
                >
                > btinternet.com>wrote:
                >
                > > The primary meaning of khamati (Sanskrit k.samate) is to bear, endure,
                > > be patient. A further meaning in both Pali and Sanskrit is 'to please'.
                > For
                > > the Pali, see the new PTS Dictionary (Cone, 2001), under khamati - entry
                > no.
                > > 3, where several citations are given showing khamati with that meaning.
                > >
                > > You can usually tell the difference by context and logic because when it
                > > means 'to endure', 'be patient', the subject of the verb is usually a
                > > sentient being. When it means 'to please', the subject of the verb is
                > often
                > > a non-sentient being - the thing that pleases the person. But not always
                > -
                > > e,g, 'ti.n.nam puggalaanam... katamo te puggalo khamati'? ...' of those
                > > people, which person pleases you, i.e. seems best to you? Here it is
                > evident
                > > that a person is being asked to pass a moral judgment on who 'pleases',
                > i.e.
                > > seems best. It is the context that makes it clear.that the speaker is
                > > talking about pleasing and not enduring.
                > >
                > > I agree with Wijeratna in that khamati does include the meaning that he
                > > gives for it, but it does also include endurance as in the endurance of
                > > suffering. All the more so when it is in the negative, meaning that
                > someone
                > > finds something 'unendurable'. That meaning extends far beyond
                > > non-interference.
                > >
                > > Metta
                > > James
                > >
                > >
                > > ----- Original Message -----
                > > From: DC Wijeratna
                > > To: Pali@yahoogroups. <mailto:Pali%40yahoogroups.com<Pali%2540yahoogroups.com>>
                > com
                > <Pali%40yahoogroups.com>
                > > Sent: Saturday, March 14, 2009 4:09 AM
                > > Subject: Re: [Pali] sabba.m me khamatiiti
                > >
                > > I think khamati is to accept things as they are. Leave the environment as
                > > it is; do not interfere. D. G. D. C. Wijeratna
                > >
                > > ________________________________
                > > From: Dipa . <dipaeightprecepter@ <mailto:dipaeightprecepter%40gmail.com<dipaeightprecepter%2540gmail.com>
                > >
                > gmail.com<dipaeightprecepter%40gmail.com>
                > > >
                > > To: Pali Group <pali@yahoogroups. <mailto:pali%40yahoogroups.com<pali%2540yahoogroups.com>>
                > com
                > <pali%40yahoogroups.com>>
                > > Sent: Thursday, March 12, 2009 4:51:54 PM
                > > Subject: [Pali] sabba.m me khamatiiti
                > >
                > > In MN 74 Diighanaka the phrase sabba.m me khamatiiti is used.
                > > I am trying to find a definition for khamatiiti. I find in the CPED
                > > khamati: to be patient; to endure; to forbear; to pardon. Thanissaro
                > > Bhikkhu
                > > translates sabba.m me khamatiiti "All is pleasing to me" In the Wisdom
                > Pub.
                > > it is translated as "Everything is acceptable to me."
                > > Can anyone point me to a resource where pleasing is given as a definition
                > > of
                > > this word? The word pleasing helps to tie the Buddha's response to
                > > Diighanaka's statements in a way that makes more sense than the word
                > > acceptable, but I want to find how the word pleasing is arrived at. If
                > > there is an online resource you can point me to for finding this I would
                > > greatly appreciate it.
                > >
                > > thanks,
                > > Diipaa
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • James Whelan
                I think Wijeratna is perfectly right in respect of mere feelings of worldy pleasure as applied to arahants. It must, however, be borne in mind that in this
                Message 7 of 7 , Mar 16, 2009
                  I think Wijeratna is perfectly right in respect of mere feelings of worldy pleasure as applied to arahants.

                  It must, however, be borne in mind that in this context, if something or someone is 'pleasing' to an arahant, it can also mean that he is expressing an approving moral judgment, as in 'katamo te puggalo khamati', which I cited yesterday. The question in 'katamo te puggalo khamati' logically has to imply that of the two people being talked about, one is 'pleasing' and the other is not. To imply the notion of equanimity into this question deprives it of all sense.

                  Remember that even the Buddha did pass moral judgments, and even the Buddha is reported to have found certain things 'pleasing' - e.g. delightful spots by secluded temples.

                  A glance through the examples from the scriptures cited in Cone's dictionary will confirm that khamati goes beyond mere equanimity. It can mean pleasing in a wordly sense, and it can also mean pleasing to one's moral sense.

                  James


                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: D.C. Wijeratna
                  To: Pali@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Monday, March 16, 2009 1:41 AM
                  Subject: RE: [Pali] sabba.m me khamatiiti


                  It all depends on what one means by pleasing. Logically, 'all is pleasing to
                  me' would mean there is nothing in somebody's experience that is displeasing
                  (or not pleasing). Such a situation is improbable. In the case of an
                  arahant. It is equanimity. So one can say to accept things with equanimity.

                  D. G. D. C. Wijeratna

                  _____

                  From: Pali@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Pali@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dipa .
                  Sent: Monday, March 16, 2009 1:31 AM
                  To: Pali@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [Pali] sabba.m me khamatiiti

                  Thank you James,
                  So, "All is pleasing to me" is a alternative translation for
                  sabba.m me khamatiitiI appreciate your letting me know where this definition
                  can be found.
                  I searched the internet for the Dictionary of Pali by Margaret Cone
                  and found that it is out of stock at Pariyatti where U.S. customers are
                  directed to order from by PTS. So, it doesn't seem to be available at
                  this time.

                  thanks,
                  Diipaa
                  Home: 417-864-4559
                  Buddhist Group web site: http://www.geocitie
                  <http://www.geocities.com/sisterdipa/index.html> s.com/sisterdipa/index.html
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                  Kalamas, when you yourselves know: 'These things are good; these things are
                  not blamable; these things are praised by the wise; undertaken and observed,
                  these things lead to benefit and happiness,' enter on and abide in them. AN
                  3.65

                  On Sun, Mar 15, 2009 at 9:49 AM, James Whelan
                  <james.whelan5@ <mailto:james.whelan5%40btinternet.com>
                  btinternet.com>wrote:

                  > The primary meaning of khamati (Sanskrit k.samate) is to bear, endure,
                  > be patient. A further meaning in both Pali and Sanskrit is 'to please'.
                  For
                  > the Pali, see the new PTS Dictionary (Cone, 2001), under khamati - entry
                  no.
                  > 3, where several citations are given showing khamati with that meaning.
                  >
                  > You can usually tell the difference by context and logic because when it
                  > means 'to endure', 'be patient', the subject of the verb is usually a
                  > sentient being. When it means 'to please', the subject of the verb is
                  often
                  > a non-sentient being - the thing that pleases the person. But not always -
                  > e,g, 'ti.n.nam puggalaanam... katamo te puggalo khamati'? ...' of those
                  > people, which person pleases you, i.e. seems best to you? Here it is
                  evident
                  > that a person is being asked to pass a moral judgment on who 'pleases',
                  i.e.
                  > seems best. It is the context that makes it clear.that the speaker is
                  > talking about pleasing and not enduring.
                  >
                  > I agree with Wijeratna in that khamati does include the meaning that he
                  > gives for it, but it does also include endurance as in the endurance of
                  > suffering. All the more so when it is in the negative, meaning that
                  someone
                  > finds something 'unendurable'. That meaning extends far beyond
                  > non-interference.
                  >
                  > Metta
                  > James
                  >
                  >
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > From: DC Wijeratna
                  > To: Pali@yahoogroups. <mailto:Pali%40yahoogroups.com> com
                  <Pali%40yahoogroups.com>
                  > Sent: Saturday, March 14, 2009 4:09 AM
                  > Subject: Re: [Pali] sabba.m me khamatiiti
                  >
                  > I think khamati is to accept things as they are. Leave the environment as
                  > it is; do not interfere. D. G. D. C. Wijeratna
                  >
                  > ________________________________
                  > From: Dipa . <dipaeightprecepter@ <mailto:dipaeightprecepter%40gmail.com>
                  gmail.com<dipaeightprecepter%40gmail.com>
                  > >
                  > To: Pali Group <pali@yahoogroups. <mailto:pali%40yahoogroups.com> com
                  <pali%40yahoogroups.com>>
                  > Sent: Thursday, March 12, 2009 4:51:54 PM
                  > Subject: [Pali] sabba.m me khamatiiti
                  >
                  > In MN 74 Diighanaka the phrase sabba.m me khamatiiti is used.
                  > I am trying to find a definition for khamatiiti. I find in the CPED
                  > khamati: to be patient; to endure; to forbear; to pardon. Thanissaro
                  > Bhikkhu
                  > translates sabba.m me khamatiiti "All is pleasing to me" In the Wisdom
                  Pub.
                  > it is translated as "Everything is acceptable to me."
                  > Can anyone point me to a resource where pleasing is given as a definition
                  > of
                  > this word? The word pleasing helps to tie the Buddha's response to
                  > Diighanaka's statements in a way that makes more sense than the word
                  > acceptable, but I want to find how the word pleasing is arrived at. If
                  > there is an online resource you can point me to for finding this I would
                  > greatly appreciate it.
                  >
                  > thanks,
                  > Diipaa
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >

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