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Re: Which parts of the Pali canon deal most directly with meditation?

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  • buddhayatana
    Hello Pat, A fundamental meditation teaching of the Buddha can be found as the Teaching on mindfulness of Breathing (Ânâpâna-sati Sutta, Majjhima-Nikâya
    Message 1 of 12 , Mar 1, 2009
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      Hello Pat,

      A fundamental meditation teaching of the Buddha can be found as the
      "Teaching on mindfulness of Breathing" (Ânâpâna-sati Sutta,
      Majjhima-Nikâya 118, XII = Anupada Vagga 8), the 20 Sutta of the
      "Grouping on Respiration" (Ânâpâna-Sa.myutta, Sa.myutta-Nikâya
      liv.1-20, V = Mahâ Vagga x.1-20, e.g. liv.13 Ânanda Sutta), and in the
      "Teaching for Girimânanda" (Girimânanda Sutta, Anguttara-Nikâya X.60,
      X = Dasaka-Nipâta 60).

      Moreover, the introduction and the first four quatrains of this
      teaching can also be found in the "(Great) Teaching on the
      establishment of Mindfulness" ((Mahâ) Sati-pa.t.thâna Sutta,
      Dîgha-Nikâya 22 and Majjhima-Nikâya 10), and in the "Teaching about
      mindfulness directed on the Body" (Kâya-gatâ-sati Sutta,
      Majjhima-Nikâya 119).

      The dark-humoured story at Sa.myutta-Nikâya 54.9 is an indication that
      the ân'âp'âna-sati method was a deliberate and very important method.

      Thich Nhat Hanh, in the booklet "Breathe: you are alive" (1988), did a
      good commentary of this most practical and psychologically subtle
      teaching.

      Mettâ-cittena.

      Jîvassatha, Buddhâyatana

      --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, Patrick Hall <pathall@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hello friends,
      >
      > I've only just begun my studies of Pali, and looking at the size of
      > the canon is rather overwhelming, millions of words of text. I'm
      > simultaneously learning about Buddhism, but I've been practicing
      > meditation for some time now.
      >
      > I'm interested in trying to read some original Pali about meditation,
      > but I really have no idea how our where to find them among the thicket
      > of text.
      >
      > Is there a section of the canon which is most focused on approaching
      > meditation?
      >
      > I realize that it may be hard to interpret the Pali texts as a
      > "how-to" guide (to get started I'm relying on a lot of works in
      > English as well as dhamma talks), but I'm motivated to try to
      > investigate some of the texts.
      >
      > Any suggestions?
      >
      > With metta,
      > Pat
      >
      > PS. I'm relying on the Unicode-encoded version of the canon from
      > http://www.buddhistethics.org/palicanon.html .
      >
    • Kumara Bhikkhu
      Pat, you may want consider reading up on the Gradual Training (as found in MN 107) to have a more complete picture of the practice, rather than just focus on
      Message 2 of 12 , Mar 3, 2009
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        Pat, you may want consider reading up on the Gradual Training (as found in MN 107) to have a more complete picture of the practice, rather than just focus on "meditation", which most people would associate with just focusing on breathing.

        kb

        --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, Patrick Hall <pathall@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello friends,
        >
        > I've only just begun my studies of Pali, and looking at the size of
        > the canon is rather overwhelming, millions of words of text. I'm
        > simultaneously learning about Buddhism, but I've been practicing
        > meditation for some time now.
        >
        > I'm interested in trying to read some original Pali about meditation,
        > but I really have no idea how our where to find them among the thicket
        > of text.
        >
        > Is there a section of the canon which is most focused on approaching
        > meditation?
        >
        > I realize that it may be hard to interpret the Pali texts as a
        > "how-to" guide (to get started I'm relying on a lot of works in
        > English as well as dhamma talks), but I'm motivated to try to
        > investigate some of the texts.
        >
        > Any suggestions?
        >
        > With metta,
        > Pat
        >
        > PS. I'm relying on the Unicode-encoded version of the canon from
        > http://www.buddhistethics.org/palicanon.html .
      • Kumara Bhikkhu
        ... It s curious though, and perhaps even unsettling, that the Buddha encouraged the practice of asubha, which many of the monks apparently did not grasp
        Message 3 of 12 , Mar 4, 2009
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          buddhayatana wrote thus at 02:50 PM 02-03-09:
          >The dark-humoured story at Sa.myutta-Nikâya 54.9 is an indication that
          >the ân'âp'âna-sati method was a deliberate and very important method.

          It's curious though, and perhaps even unsettling, that the Buddha encouraged the practice of asubha, which many of the monks apparently did not grasp correctly and consequently committed suicide.

          As usual, whenever I find something "odd" in the Pali suttas, I'd try to look up the counterpart in the Chinese Agamas. What I found was basically the same. It even contains the additional juicy stuff, making it very much like the Vinaya Pitaka version (the supposed background story to Parajika 3), which is repeated in the commentary to the sutta.

          Although the commentary tries to reconcile the matter by giving a background story of a past life and what thoughts occurred to the Buddha, it's curious how the commentator managed to obtain such information.

          kb
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