Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Pali Day by Day G041 Question + Cosmic Smile

Expand Messages
  • mahipaliha
    Dear Florent, Jim and Piya To address a few points in this discourse: (1) Our problem related to words ferom a verse found in a cluster of texts having the
    Message 1 of 134 , Dec 5, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Dear Florent, Jim and Piya

      To address a few points in this discourse:
      (1) Our problem related to words ferom a verse found in a cluster of
      texts having the interesting story of a family of ascetics who lived
      on lotus roots, how Sakka tested them by hiding the chief ascetic's
      sahre and how each one plus a friendly elephant tried to show his
      innocence- by making a binding declaration or sapatha. The verse
      gives the elephant's sapatha, appropriate to a lover of the delights
      of the forest."Let him who stole the the revered ascetic's food be
      taken from the lovely forest, tied hundreds of times with ropes,and
      prodded with spikes, to suffer the travails of living among human
      beings."

      (2) We had the question about chamhi. Other versions have chabbhi. It
      was asked whether chabbhi is the right form or chahi? Actually words
      for six include chahi/chabbhi, chasu/chassu. Chabbhi and chassu are
      phonetic evolutions from older Indo-Aryan words .sa.dbhi.h
      and .sa.t.su, whereas chahi and chasu are 'adjustments'
      or 'corrections' done in order to suit the grammatical rules that
      were enunciated much later, which assume stems and endings: stem cha-
      must give chahi and chasu. And this theory held. So we have thousands
      of such 'corrections' in the extant Pali texts. This is why some
      scholars would think that Pali is an artificail language.Yet,
      historical remnants of earlier more 'natural' forms are also legion.

      (1b) Skt version in Jaatakamaalaa has ".sa.dbhir d.r.dhai.h paaSa-
      'satai.h sa bandham", whose first word is the equivalent of sabbhi.

      (2) Metre: The metre here is Indravajraa, which is a metre more
      familiar in ornate poetry. In this kind of Pali text, the metres are
      not perfectly followed. So we have short syllables where long ones
      would be regular. Also, since verses were, in oral tradition, simply
      recited, the reciter could always adjust the reading to make short
      look like long. In particular the last syllable would almost always
      be recited long, whether written long or not.

      (3) Piya thinks we don't have -mh- in Pali. amhe, tumhe, amhaaka.m,
      tumhaaka.m, tamhi, yamhi, gimha, gimhaana etc. etc.??

      Regards.

      Mahinda
    • Ong Yong Peng
      Dear friends, below is the link to NPC2 study guide, if you are looking for it. metta, Yong Peng. ... http://www.tipitaka.net/palicourseguide2.pdf
      Message 134 of 134 , Feb 23, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        Dear friends,

        below is the link to NPC2 study guide, if you are looking for it.


        metta,
        Yong Peng.



        --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, Ong Yong Peng wrote:

        http://www.tipitaka.net/palicourseguide2.pdf
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.