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Re: Dhammapala

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  • ong.yongpeng
    Dear Jon, thank you. I now see that you are referring to a king Dhammapala (of Sri Lanka), who gave away his kingdom. metta, Yong Peng. ... This king was more
    Message 1 of 19 , Aug 1, 2008
      Dear Jon,

      thank you. I now see that you are referring to a king Dhammapala (of
      Sri Lanka), who gave away his kingdom.

      metta,
      Yong Peng.


      --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, Jon Fernquest wrote:

      This king was more notorious than famous, notorious for handing over
      everything that belonged to the sangha to the Portuguese and the
      Catholic church (the Sangha itself must have fled, will have to look
      for details here)
    • ong.yongpeng
      Dear Jon, I have been mainly using CSCD edition of the Tipitaka for our sutta translation exercises. (CST4, which is currently under development, will
      Message 2 of 19 , Aug 1, 2008
        Dear Jon,

        I have been mainly using CSCD edition of the Tipitaka for our sutta
        translation exercises. (CST4, which is currently under development,
        will eventually succeed CSCD.) In addition, there are other editions
        freely available online. We also have a wiki which aims to make
        browsing SLTP (from the Journal of Buddhist Ethics site) easier.

        Our future sutta translation exercises will continue using CSCD (and
        CST4), I may also use SLTP and other public domain and open content
        versions, to encourage and support good works in Dhamma publications.
        I mainly use CSCD because I can browse the CD-ROM contents offline.

        If you search for Rhys Davids on Google, you may find several of his
        works already available online. By using a dual screen, with multiple
        windows open and displaying Pali in one and English (or other
        languages) in the other(s), you can easily set up a simple parallel
        Tipitaka.

        metta,
        Yong Peng.


        --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, Jon Fernquest wrote:

        The only online Pali versions that I've ever used are the CSCD versions.

        As for the English translations, the copyright on the Rhys Davids
        translations must have run out already. Wonder why it hasn't been
        scanned and put online?
      • Jon Fernquest
        Dear Yong Peng; I have been mainly using CSCD edition of the Tipitaka for our sutta translation exercises. (CST4, which is currently under development, will
        Message 3 of 19 , Aug 10, 2008
          Dear Yong Peng;

          "I have been mainly using CSCD edition of the Tipitaka for our sutta

          translation exercises. (CST4, which is currently under development,

          will eventually succeed CSCD.) In addition, there are other editions

          freely available online. We also have a wiki which aims to make

          browsing SLTP (from the Journal of Buddhist Ethics site) easier."


          Thank you for the information about CST4 and SLTP.
          I wasn't aware of their existence.
          Where is the Wiki?


          "If you search for Rhys Davids on Google, you may find several of his

          works already available online. By using a dual screen, with multiple

          windows open and displaying Pali in one and English (or other

          languages) in the other(s), you can easily set up a simple parallel

          Tipitaka."

          I do something like this sometimes but it takes a long time,
          slowed down finding the matching text between the Pali and English.

          One of these days I'm going to try my hand with statistical based alignment of the Pali Jatakas. with their English translation. I have all the necessary texts on my hard drive now.
          It requires some creative programming but there  are papers  detailing the techniques.

          First, you'd need to lematise the words, eliminate inflection and conjugation, map the nouns to third person singular and verbs to their stem (or something like that). Then the search engine searches on these lematised words.
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lemmatisation

          The result of a query would be Pali sentences and their English translation. I use two corpuses everyday to create phrases to practice reading a word. Ideally I would include the Thai translation but I only use a single language corpus:
          http://www.americancorpus.org/
          http://www.natcorp.ox.ac.uk/
          http://www.readbangkokpost.com/businesswords/

          Such a search engine for Pali sentences aligned with their translation could be used as the basis of induction driven language learning. Buddhadata-like sentences are great because they simplify the grammar but real life sentences are a lot tougher as I.B. Horner's little parallel Pali-English Jataka reader makes clear.

          With metta,
          Jon Fernquest

           

          --- On Fri, 8/1/08, ong.yongpeng <pali.smith@...> wrote:
          From: ong.yongpeng <pali.smith@...>
          Subject: [Pali] Re: Tipitaka Citations
          To: Pali@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Friday, August 1, 2008, 8:42 PM











          Dear Jon,



          I have been mainly using CSCD edition of the Tipitaka for our sutta

          translation exercises. (CST4, which is currently under development,

          will eventually succeed CSCD.) In addition, there are other editions

          freely available online. We also have a wiki which aims to make

          browsing SLTP (from the Journal of Buddhist Ethics site) easier.



          Our future sutta translation exercises will continue using CSCD (and

          CST4), I may also use SLTP and other public domain and open content

          versions, to encourage and support good works in Dhamma publications.

          I mainly use CSCD because I can browse the CD-ROM contents offline.



          If you search for Rhys Davids on Google, you may find several of his

          works already available online. By using a dual screen, with multiple

          windows open and displaying Pali in one and English (or other

          languages) in the other(s), you can easily set up a simple parallel

          Tipitaka.



          metta,

          Yong Peng.



          --- In Pali@yahoogroups. com, Jon Fernquest wrote:



          The only online Pali versions that I've ever used are the CSCD versions.



          As for the English translations, the copyright on the Rhys Davids

          translations must have run out already. Wonder why it hasn't been

          scanned and put online?





























          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • ong.yongpeng
          Dear Jon and friends, the wiki is here: http://tipitaka.pbwiki.com/ Again, anyone keen in helping to complete the entire tipitaka, please let me know. Jon, as
          Message 4 of 19 , Aug 11, 2008
            Dear Jon and friends,

            the wiki is here: http://tipitaka.pbwiki.com/

            Again, anyone keen in helping to complete the entire tipitaka, please
            let me know.

            Jon, as for your proposed work, statistics is an area which I like.
            ;-) The group has completed the whole of AN1 in trilinear format,
            which you may find helpful. I have also done some foundation works on
            Pali Scope, http://www.tipitaka.net/pali/scope/. You are welcome to
            use the data as required. If you are interested, you are also welcome
            to provide assistance to the project (Pali Scope). The project is very
            extensive, the first phase is to build up a substantial repository of
            Pali words directly from the Tipitaka (probably only AN of Sutta
            Pitaka). As a lexicordance, it will eventually have a lexicon and a
            concordance built to utilise the database. A parallel translator can
            also be incorporated, if you like to provide the technical
            functionalities.

            Unlike the wikis, Pali Scope is not open for free editing, but any
            information on Pali Scope is free for use.

            metta,
            Yong Peng.


            --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, Jon Fernquest wrote:

            Where is the Wiki?

            One of these days I'm going to try my hand with statistical based
            alignment of the Pali Jatakas. with their English translation. I have
            all the necessary texts on my hard drive now.
            It requires some creative programming but there� are papers� detailing
            the techniques.

            First, you'd need to lematise the words, eliminate inflection and
            conjugation, map the nouns to third person singular and verbs to their
            stem (or something like that). Then the search engine searches on
            these lematised words.
            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lemmatisation
          • Jon Fernquest
            Dear Yong Peng; ... Yes, I would very much like to help out. But it will have to be slowly because working at the online part of a newspaper I publish 65
            Message 5 of 19 , Aug 12, 2008
              Dear Yong Peng;

              > Again, anyone keen in helping to complete the entire tipitaka, please
              > let me know.

              Yes, I would very much like to help out.
              But it will have to be slowly because working
              at the online part of a newspaper I publish 65 articles
              a month on economics and business in Thailand so
              my brain is usually resembles scrambled eggs.

              For an interesting example of lemmatization, check out volume I
              (nouns.pdf) on the following site at INRIA:

              http://sanskrit.inria.fr/

              Every entry is a little information preserving map between
              the inflected Sanskrit form and the uninflected form with
              the grammatical information that specifies the inflection.
              Unfortunately, this doesn't exist for Pali yet.

              Have you seen the following sites?

              http://sanskrit.inria.fr/
              http://ralyx.inria.fr/2007/Raweb/signes/uid43.html
              http://ralyx.inria.fr/2007/Raweb/signes/uid39.html

              Author of tools:
              http://pauillac.inria.fr/~huet/

              Sanskrit has all the necessary tools written already,
              albeit in CAML, a functional language.
              including a declension engine that adds grammatical inflections
              and a lemmatiser that maps them to their basic (stem) form.
              They don't appear to be open source.

              Institut national de recherche en informatique et en automatique (INRIA)
              (English: National Institute for Research in Computer Science and
              Control) is a French national research institution focusing on computer
              science, control theory and applied mathematics.
              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/INRIA

              For looking up Pali words a full dictionary
              with fully inflected forms similar to this one
              would be highly useful. Right now there is just
              too many missing entries:

              http://www.dicts.info/dictionary.php?k1=1&k2=442

              With metta,
              Jon Fernquest
            • ong.yongpeng
              Dear Jon, thanks for the reference sites. The one quoted below is real interesting. I do foresee the lexicon section of PaliScope to provide full paradigms of
              Message 6 of 19 , Aug 12, 2008
                Dear Jon,

                thanks for the reference sites. The one quoted below is real
                interesting. I do foresee the lexicon section of PaliScope to provide
                full paradigms of nouns and verbs as you mentioned.

                In addition to what is discussed so far, we would also need advice and
                assistance in two major areas. First, linguistic experts to advise on
                stuff like lemmatization, and so on. Second, Pali readers who can
                provide cross-referencing over several editions of the Tipitaka.

                Hence, I believe the project will be a progressive one, where data and
                functionality are added over time. Please let me know when you are
                ready to start.

                metta,
                Yong Peng.


                --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, Jon Fernquest wrote:

                Yes, I would very much like to help out. But it will have to be slowly
                because working at the online part of a newspaper I publish 65
                articles a month on economics and business in Thailand so my brain is
                usually resembles scrambled eggs.

                For looking up Pali words a full dictionary with fully inflected forms
                similar to this one would be highly useful. Right now there is just
                too many missing entries:

                http://www.dicts.info/dictionary.php?k1=1&k2=442
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