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SV: [Pali] Re: Tipitaka Citations

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  • ong.yongpeng
    Dear Jon, Gunnar and Piya, thanks for the interesting exchange. When printing technology first appeared in China and East Asia, the wood-block printing method
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 26 6:38 PM
      Dear Jon, Gunnar and Piya,

      thanks for the interesting exchange. When printing technology first
      appeared in China and East Asia, the wood-block printing method was
      created for printing Buddhist scriptures, undoubtedly for wider
      distribution!

      Many aspects of Christians, e.g. evangelising and enterprising, should
      be minimal, if acquired at all.

      Jon, I am very interested in the works you are engaged in. While all
      other religions stuck with a holy language for centuries, Buddhist
      teachings have been orally transmitted in local vernaculars, and then
      recorded and translated into various languages since its founding.

      Even though I am not a professional and still very new to it, parallel
      comparative studies of early Buddhist texts is of great interest to
      me. The digital age and the new media it delivers would greatly
      enhance the exchange of knowledge and expertise across the world.
      Please do keep us posted on trends and events in this area.


      metta,
      Yong Peng.


      --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, Jon Fernquest wrote:

      Buddhism has traditions of translation probably as ancient as
      Christianity, in Sinhalese, Mon (See DuPont's Narada Jataka), Tai
      Yuan, Burmese (nissaya), one day these traditions will get more
      attention. Justin McDaniels at UC RIverside, who did his PhD on
      parallel translations between Pali and Tai Yuan (Chiang Mai), is
      coming out with a book this year. I'm doing a mini-review of the
      literature for learning Mon for the SOAS Bulletin of Burma Studies.
      Someone even proposed a panel on textual transmission for the upcoming
      Asian Studies Association meeting in Chicago. One might even say that
      translation as a part of textual transmission between cultures is an
      up and coming field, though people like Ludwik Sternbach traced Indian
      Suphasita through India and Southeast Asia decades ago.
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