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Re: fuzzy logic

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  • Ong Yong Peng
    Dear Tapkina, DaveK and friends, I am also interested to read passages in the Pali Tipitaka containing such logical expressions too. As Dave pointed out,
    Message 1 of 3 , May 9, 2008
      Dear Tapkina, DaveK and friends,

      I am also interested to read passages in the Pali Tipitaka containing
      such "logical expressions" too. As Dave pointed out, Kosko probably
      come across them from Mahayana literature, in particular the
      Madhyamaka philosophy, which is formulated at the time when the
      development of Buddhist logic reached its peak.

      I find "A OR not-A" an exclusive statement, as in either this or that
      and nothing else. On the other hand, I find "A AND not-A" an inclusive
      statement. Philosophically, "A AND not-A" statements are often used to
      explain about Buddhist concepts, such as nibbaana, su~n~nataa, by the
      Madhyamaka school.

      metta,
      Yong Peng


      --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, Antonella Comba wrote:

      He says that he prefers the Buddha's A AND not-A to Aristotle's A OR
      not-A. Do you know if there are some Suttas or passages in Pali Canon
      where Lord Buddha exposed any such logic theory?
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