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Re: emsTyper 1.1 testing - Pali transliteration on web pages

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  • Jon Fernquest
    Dear Palitechguy; where to download a free Burmese font http://sealang.net/burmese/dictionary.htm This is Doug Cooper s site funded by the U.S. Department of
    Message 1 of 19 , Apr 29, 2008
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      Dear Palitechguy;

      "where to download a free Burmese font"

      http://sealang.net/burmese/dictionary.htm

      This is Doug Cooper's site funded by the U.S. Department of Education.
      He uses the most up-to-date fonts and last time I talked to him there
      was no full unicode implementation. The following site of a Burmese
      computational linguist looks promising too:

      http://myanmarnlpteam.blogspot.com/

      This site also does a good job with Burmese script:

      http://www.burmese-dictionary.org/

      If you do something to handle Burmese script via transliteration, it would
      be much appreciated since people who write articles for the SOAS
      Bulletin of Burma Studies could start using it:

      http://web.soas.ac.uk/burma/bulletin.htm

      Pali is a living language within the Sangha in many countries including
      Burma, Thailand, and Sri Lanka. There are much more complete
      dictionaries and parallel translations (nissaya) in these countries that
      can be an immense aid in learning the language, much more than
      anything in PTS transliteration. Yet another reason for learning a local
      script. Maybe one day someone will write an OCR program for Burmese
      script and these can be rendered into PTS transliteration, but I wouldn't
      hold my breath.

      The apparent reference to Kamavacca manuscripts was in the Yuan Shi
      (not the larger Ssu Ma Chien project), chapter 210 on the Mian (Burma-
      Myanmar), unicode:

      `´•¶ŽšiãŽÒCtheir writing is
      —p‹à—t›"VCthey use gold leaf to write it
      ŽŸ—pŽ†Cnext they use paper
      –"ŽŸ—pŸF˜P—tCthey also use the leaf of the areca palm

      "Their most important (ã) writings are written with gold leaf, the next
      ones (ŽŸ) on paper, and the next ones on leaves..."

      http://www.chinahistoryforum.com/index.php?
      s=&showtopic=16122&view=findpost&p=4874637

      With metta,
      Jon Fernquest
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