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Re: emsTyper 1.1 testing - Pali transliteration on web pages

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  • palitechguy
    Hi Jon and George; 1) Jon : I found the Burmese Unicode decimal values. There are about 90 codes for letters, numbers, and some other things. If I understand
    Message 1 of 19 , Apr 27, 2008
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      Hi Jon and George;

      1) Jon : I found the Burmese Unicode decimal values. There are about
      90 codes for letters, numbers, and some other things. If I understand
      correctly, these are the Unicode codes you wish to use? If so, I just
      need to know
      - where to download a free Burmese font (so I can get it and mention
      it in emsTyper)
      - what transliteration codes you would prefer for the characters

      2) About preserving original texts. I think that there may be
      something in behind this discussion worth noting.

      In the vinaya : Schism. A schism is a serious division in the
      Community — so serious that, if achieved in a dishonest way, it ranks
      with matricide, patricide, killing an arahant, and maliciously
      shedding the Tathāgata's blood as one of the five most heinous crimes
      a person can commit (AN V.129).

      The following link provides a list about the topic 'Dhamma as
      not-Dhamma' (which I'm sure that everybody is aware of - I'm just
      including the link as a convenience):
      http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/thanissaro/bmc1/bmc1.ch05.html#Sg10

      Perhaps it is for this reason that Buddhist scholars and monastics
      feel that it is very important to work with the original texts and
      scripts? Any translation/reformatting is lossy. Even changing the
      paper and ink can create a loss of information for scholars (for
      instance, dating documents or identifying authors by their materials).

      I would suggest that the Buddha's teaching (dhamma) is actually very
      simple. However, the Buddha called his teaching the dhammavinaya.
      Perhaps it is more in the context of the vinaya where the importance
      of working with the best materials available becomes more evident?

      3) Even if you do not speak Burmese, here is a possible situation?
      George finds a text about something in Burmese - but the quote
      provided is in romanized Burmese text. George is not comfortable with
      the comments. He wants to see what other scholars have to say about
      the original text. He needs to search for the Burmese quote. With
      emsTyper, George has a handy way to search for the quote - even if he
      doesn't speak Burmese.

      metta

      palitechguy

      --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, "gdbedell" <gdbedell@...> wrote:
      >
      > Jon,
      >
      > I am not sure we are getting anywhere<snip>
    • TK Wen
      Dear Jon I m just starting to learn Burmese. Would you please recommend the best unicode font for typing Burmese and Pali in word processor. I found two fonts
      Message 2 of 19 , Apr 27, 2008
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        Dear Jon

        I'm just starting to learn Burmese. Would you please recommend the best unicode font for typing Burmese and Pali in word processor. I found two fonts on the internet, Myanmar2 and PadaukOT. It seems they are still developing, but which is more promising.

        with much metta

        tzungkuen


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      • Jon Fernquest
        Dear Palitechguy; where to download a free Burmese font http://sealang.net/burmese/dictionary.htm This is Doug Cooper s site funded by the U.S. Department of
        Message 3 of 19 , Apr 29, 2008
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          Dear Palitechguy;

          "where to download a free Burmese font"

          http://sealang.net/burmese/dictionary.htm

          This is Doug Cooper's site funded by the U.S. Department of Education.
          He uses the most up-to-date fonts and last time I talked to him there
          was no full unicode implementation. The following site of a Burmese
          computational linguist looks promising too:

          http://myanmarnlpteam.blogspot.com/

          This site also does a good job with Burmese script:

          http://www.burmese-dictionary.org/

          If you do something to handle Burmese script via transliteration, it would
          be much appreciated since people who write articles for the SOAS
          Bulletin of Burma Studies could start using it:

          http://web.soas.ac.uk/burma/bulletin.htm

          Pali is a living language within the Sangha in many countries including
          Burma, Thailand, and Sri Lanka. There are much more complete
          dictionaries and parallel translations (nissaya) in these countries that
          can be an immense aid in learning the language, much more than
          anything in PTS transliteration. Yet another reason for learning a local
          script. Maybe one day someone will write an OCR program for Burmese
          script and these can be rendered into PTS transliteration, but I wouldn't
          hold my breath.

          The apparent reference to Kamavacca manuscripts was in the Yuan Shi
          (not the larger Ssu Ma Chien project), chapter 210 on the Mian (Burma-
          Myanmar), unicode:

          `´•¶ŽšiãŽÒCtheir writing is
          —p‹à—t›"VCthey use gold leaf to write it
          ŽŸ—pŽ†Cnext they use paper
          –"ŽŸ—pŸF˜P—tCthey also use the leaf of the areca palm

          "Their most important (ã) writings are written with gold leaf, the next
          ones (ŽŸ) on paper, and the next ones on leaves..."

          http://www.chinahistoryforum.com/index.php?
          s=&showtopic=16122&view=findpost&p=4874637

          With metta,
          Jon Fernquest
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