Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Pali] Literal meaning of Metta?

Expand Messages
  • Nina van Gorkom
    Dear Dipankaro and friends, Reading about your posts about mettaa, I want to add something. Dipankaro quoted from the subco: The sub-commentaries defined the
    Message 1 of 9 , Dec 26, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Dear Dipankaro and friends,
      Reading about your posts about mettaa, I want to add something.
      Dipankaro quoted from the subco:
      The sub-commentaries defined the word in this way: "mejjati
      siniyhatiiti
      mitto"; (Mahavagga .tiikaa etc.) It implies to the dhamma that loves
      but not the
      person.
      I appreciate this. Mettaa is not a person, it is a dhamma, a reality
      arising because of its own conditions. It is the cetasika adosa, non-
      aversion, it is not mine or self. It is one of the three sobhana
      hetus, the others being alobha, non-attachment, and amoha or paññaa.
      When it is directed towards a living being, it is mettaa, kindness.
      When kusala citta with adosa cetasika arises, there is always alobha,
      non-attachment as well. Thus, mettaa, friendship has nothing to do
      with attachment.
      Nina.

      Op 25-dec-2007, om 6:30 heeft boaz amichay het volgende geschreven:

      > The word metta comes from the sanskrit word mitra. Mitra means a
      > "friend" or a "companion". It comes from the root mith which means
      > "to unite" "to couple" "to meet".



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • P G Dave
      metta = mitra (in sanskrit) = friend metta bhavana = maitri (in sanskrit) = friendship / friendliness (which in its dhamma sense gets intensified to loving
      Message 2 of 9 , Dec 26, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        metta = mitra (in sanskrit) = friend
        metta bhavana = maitri (in sanskrit) = friendship / friendliness (which in
        its dhamma sense gets intensified to "loving kindness")

        hope this helps.

        cheers.
        __________________________________

        On 12/23/07, henntsp <henntsp@...> wrote:
        >
        > Metta is commonly translated as love,loving kindness etc.
        >
        > Does anyone know it's literal translation into English?
        >
        > Do you know the root meaning of Metta? e.g. is it two words? met and
        > ta? Does it have a compareable word in Sanskrit?
        >
        > If anyone is aware of this I would greatly appreciate your help.
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Gunnar Gällmo
        ... The Pali word for this concept is mitta , not metta . ... The Pali word for this concept is mettaa , without addition; mettaa-bhaavanaa is the
        Message 3 of 9 , Dec 27, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          --- P G Dave <pgd2507@...> skrev:

          > metta = mitra (in sanskrit) = friend

          The Pali word for this concept is "mitta", not
          "metta".

          > metta bhavana = maitri (in sanskrit) = friendship /
          > friendliness (which in
          > its dhamma sense gets intensified to "loving
          > kindness")

          The Pali word for this concept is "mettaa", without
          addition; "mettaa-bhaavanaa" is the meditation where
          metta is cultivated.

          An alternative word for "friendship" is "mittataa". I
          am not quite sure about the difference in nuance
          between "mittataa" and "mettaa".

          I think that in Sanskrit - at least in Buddhist Hybrid
          Sanskrit - there is also the form "maitraa", in
          addition to "maitrii".

          Gunnar

          http://metrobloggen.se/esperanto





          _________________________________________________________
          Flyger tiden iväg? Fånga dagen med Yahoo! Mails inbyggda
          kalender. Dessutom 250 MB gratis, virusscanning och antispam. Få den på: http://se.mail.yahoo.com
        • Dipankar Chakma
          Dear Nina, Thanks for your comments. Actually you have pointed rightly from the Abhidhamma perspective. Thanks for sharing your good knowledge with us. With
          Message 4 of 9 , Dec 27, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            Dear Nina,
            Thanks for your comments. Actually you have pointed rightly from the Abhidhamma perspective.
            Thanks for sharing your good knowledge with us.
            With metta,
            Dipankaro


            ----- Original Message ----
            From: Nina van Gorkom <vangorko@...>
            To: Pali@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Wednesday, December 26, 2007 4:54:41 PM
            Subject: Re: [Pali] Literal meaning of Metta?

            Dear Dipankaro and friends,
            Reading about your posts about mettaa, I want to add something.
            Dipankaro quoted from the subco:
            The sub-commentaries defined the word in this way: "mejjati
            siniyhatiiti
            mitto"; (Mahavagga .tiikaa etc.) It implies to the dhamma that loves
            but not the
            person.
            I appreciate this. Mettaa is not a person, it is a dhamma, a reality
            arising because of its own conditions. It is the cetasika adosa, non-
            aversion, it is not mine or self. It is one of the three sobhana
            hetus, the others being alobha, non-attachment, and amoha or paññaa.
            When it is directed towards a living being, it is mettaa, kindness.
            When kusala citta with adosa cetasika arises, there is always alobha,
            non-attachment as well. Thus, mettaa, friendship has nothing to do
            with attachment.
            Nina.

            Op 25-dec-2007, om 6:30 heeft boaz amichay het volgende geschreven:

            > The word metta comes from the sanskrit word mitra. Mitra means a
            > "friend" or a "companion". It comes from the root mith which means
            > "to unite" "to couple" "to meet".

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




            Send instant messages to your online friends http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • mahanikaya
            The Meaning of Metta is unlimited unconditional loving kindness for all beings. ... the Abhidhamma perspective. ... loves ... reality ... non- ... paññaa.
            Message 5 of 9 , Dec 27, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              The Meaning of Metta is unlimited unconditional loving kindness
              for all beings.


              --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, Dipankar Chakma <dipankaro@...> wrote:
              >
              > Dear Nina,
              > Thanks for your comments. Actually you have pointed rightly from
              the Abhidhamma perspective.
              > Thanks for sharing your good knowledge with us.
              > With metta,
              > Dipankaro
              >
              >
              > ----- Original Message ----
              > From: Nina van Gorkom <vangorko@...>
              > To: Pali@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Wednesday, December 26, 2007 4:54:41 PM
              > Subject: Re: [Pali] Literal meaning of Metta?
              >
              > Dear Dipankaro and friends,
              > Reading about your posts about mettaa, I want to add something.
              > Dipankaro quoted from the subco:
              > The sub-commentaries defined the word in this way: "mejjati
              > siniyhatiiti
              > mitto"; (Mahavagga .tiikaa etc.) It implies to the dhamma that
              loves
              > but not the
              > person.
              > I appreciate this. Mettaa is not a person, it is a dhamma, a
              reality
              > arising because of its own conditions. It is the cetasika adosa,
              non-
              > aversion, it is not mine or self. It is one of the three sobhana
              > hetus, the others being alobha, non-attachment, and amoha or
              paññaa.
              > When it is directed towards a living being, it is mettaa, kindness.
              > When kusala citta with adosa cetasika arises, there is always
              alobha,
              > non-attachment as well. Thus, mettaa, friendship has nothing to do
              > with attachment.
              > Nina.
              >
              > Op 25-dec-2007, om 6:30 heeft boaz amichay het volgende geschreven:
              >
              > > The word metta comes from the sanskrit word mitra. Mitra means a
              > > "friend" or a "companion". It comes from the root mith which
              means
              > > "to unite" "to couple" "to meet".
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Send instant messages to your online friends
              http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.