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Re: [Pali] Sanskrit & Pali

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  • Dmytro O. Ivakhnenko
    Dear Keren, ... Sanskrit is an attempt to revive ancient Vedic. Similarly, one can try to reconstruct Ancient Indian equivalents of Pali words:
    Message 1 of 10 , Jan 6, 2007
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      Dear Keren,

      > I would be happy to hear your knowledgeable opinion about "tracking" a
      > Pali word from the Sanskrit one for understanding it meaning better.
      > I see this method quite often in books and articles. The author try to
      > understand the Pali word better by going to the Sanskrit verb or word.
      > But since Pali might be a vencular language closly connected to Vedic
      > rather than classical Sanskrit (and it meanings in the dictionary),
      > and the unknown fact whether the Buddha new sanskrit at all, what is
      > the significance of going to the Sanskrit?

      Sanskrit is an attempt to revive ancient Vedic.

      Similarly, one can try to reconstruct Ancient Indian equivalents of Pali
      words:

      http://www.lioncity.net/buddhism/index.php?showtopic=23156&view=findpost&p=357480

      It helps to understand the etymology.

      And the Sanskrit dictionaries are much more developed than Pali ones.

      Metta, Dmytro




      >
      > Thanks for any thoughts and ideas,
      > Keren.
      >
      >
      >
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    • Piya Tan
      Sukhi hotu. Perhaps someone familiar with the Vinaya could help in this interesting case here: In *the Bahiya Sutta* (U 1.10) and *the Acela Kassapa Sutta* (S
      Message 2 of 10 , Jan 23, 2007
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        Sukhi hotu.

        Perhaps someone familiar with the Vinaya could help in this interesting case
        here:

        In *the Bahiya Sutta* (U 1.10) and *the Acela Kassapa Sutta* (S 12.17), the
        Buddha is asked thrice to teach the Dharma, but each time, he replies, "*This
        is not the proper time. We have entered amongst houses*."

        Buddhaghosa says that this is to gain respect from Acela Kassapa and also so
        that his knowledge would ripen (SA 2:35).
        Dhammapala, however, is more convincing in his detailed discussion, one
        explanation of which is that Bahiya is very excited on meeting the Buddha,
        who thrice says no mainly to calm him down before teaching Dharma (UA 90).

        What is interesting is that there is *no comment whatsoever (am I wrong
        here?) on the actual statement*, "*We are have entered amongst houses*"
        (antara,ghare pavi.t.thamha). This phrase and its variations are commonly
        found in the Vinaya esp the Sekhiya, and also in the Suttas.

        However, I have been unable to locate any Vinaya rule to the effect that a
        monk should not teach Dharma when "amongst houses," meaning with (1) not to
        teach Dharma in the streets, or (2) not to teach Dharma when on almsround,
        or both. Or, is there no such rule?

        Has anyone any insight on this interesting topic: I have also not found any
        teacher or scholar referring to his matter.

        This is part of my introductory notes to the Acela Kassapa Sutta
        translation.

        Metta and mudita,

        Piya Tan

        *The Minding Centre
        *Blk 644 Bukit Batok Central, #01-68 (2nd flr),
        [near Bukit Batok MRT/Interchange] Singapore 650644.
        *Minding Centre Website:
        http://mindcentre.googlepages.com<http://minding.centre.googlepages.com/>
        *
        Dharmafarer website: http://dharmafarer.googlepages.com
        HP: 8211 0879; Tel: 6569 5205


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • P G Dave
        Dear Karen, If u hear sanskrit and pali, u would see that they are very closely realted in the vocabulary and the grammar. pali would sound like a rustic or
        Message 3 of 10 , Jan 24, 2007
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          Dear Karen,

          If u hear sanskrit and pali, u would see that they are very closely realted
          in the vocabulary and the grammar. pali would sound like a rustic or common
          man's version of sanskrit - smoothened out, so to speak. One grew up hearing
          it spoken, so one spoke it. It would not be wrong to say that pali is more a
          dialect of sankrit than an independent language (no wonder pali has no
          script of its own).

          compare some words:

          *sanskrit - pali - english*
          cakshu - cakkhu - eye
          purve - pubbe - before
          dharma - dhamma - prefer not to translate
          nirvana - nibbana - prefer not to translate
          utpadan - uppadan - produce (noun)
          bhikshu - bhikkhu - monk
          soka - shoka - mourning (the Sh_ sound replaced by S_)
          the list is virtually endless.

          the simpler words like 'Buddha' remain unchanged.

          the half 'r' as in dharma or purva, is smothened out in pali by doubling the
          following letter as in dhamma and pubbe ('v' usually changes to 'b' in the
          process).

          So it's only natural to revert to Sanskrit to understand Pali better.
          Secondly, there are plenty of schools teaching sanskrit as a second / third
          language and arts colleges offer graduation in Sanskrit literature. So, u'll
          find plenty of people knowing Sanskrit, but not so with Pali. Therefore,
          learning pali thru sanskrit comes very naturally to them. To use an analogy
          -- Sanskrit is classical music and Pali a folk song.

          Whether Buddha knew sanskrit - I have no doubt that he did. He was a prince
          and his father must have undoubtedly provided the best education
          befitting royalty, with separate tutors for sanskrit, literature, music, the
          shashtras, combat training in swordplay, archery, etc., economics
          (artha-shaashtra), governance, diplomacy and so an as was customary.

          Metta.
          __________________________________________________


          On 1/6/07, keren_arbel <keren_arbel@...> wrote:
          >
          > Dear All,
          >
          > I would be happy to hear your knowledgeable opinion about "tracking" a
          > Pali word from the Sanskrit one for understanding it meaning better.
          > I see this method quite often in books and articles. The author try to
          > understand the Pali word better by going to the Sanskrit verb or word.
          > But since Pali might be a vencular language closly connected to Vedic
          > rather than classical Sanskrit (and it meanings in the dictionary),
          > and the unknown fact whether the Buddha new sanskrit at all, what is
          > the significance of going to the Sanskrit?
          >
          > Thanks for any thoughts and ideas,
          > Keren.
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • P G Dave
          *Correction*: Under compare some words: please read -- soka - shoka - mourning (the Sh_ sound replaced by S_) AS shoka - soka - mourning (the Sh_ sound
          Message 4 of 10 , Jan 24, 2007
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            *Correction*:

            Under "compare some words:" please read --

            soka - shoka - mourning (the Sh_ sound replaced by S_)
            AS
            shoka - soka - mourning (the Sh_ sound replaced by S_)

            sorry for the error.
            _________________________________________

            On 1/24/07, P G Dave <pgd2507@...> wrote:
            >
            > Dear Karen,
            >
            > If u hear sanskrit and pali, u would see that they are very closely
            > realted in the vocabulary and the grammar. pali would sound like a rustic or
            > common man's version of sanskrit - smoothened out, so to speak. One grew up
            > hearing it spoken, so one spoke it. It would not be wrong to say that pali
            > is more a dialect of sankrit than an independent language (no wonder pali
            > has no script of its own).
            >
            > compare some words:
            >
            > *sanskrit - pali - english*
            > cakshu - cakkhu - eye
            > purve - pubbe - before
            > dharma - dhamma - prefer not to translate
            > nirvana - nibbana - prefer not to translate
            > utpadan - uppadan - produce (noun)
            > bhikshu - bhikkhu - monk
            > soka - shoka - mourning (the Sh_ sound replaced by S_)
            > the list is virtually endless.
            >
            > the simpler words like 'Buddha' remain unchanged.
            >
            > the half 'r' as in dharma or purva, is smothened out in pali by doubling
            > the following letter as in dhamma and pubbe ('v' usually changes to 'b' in
            > the process).
            >
            > So it's only natural to revert to Sanskrit to understand Pali better.
            > Secondly, there are plenty of schools teaching sanskrit as a second / third
            > language and arts colleges offer graduation in Sanskrit literature. So, u'll
            > find plenty of people knowing Sanskrit, but not so with Pali. Therefore,
            > learning pali thru sanskrit comes very naturally to them. To use an analogy
            > -- Sanskrit is classical music and Pali a folk song.
            >
            > Whether Buddha knew sanskrit - I have no doubt that he did. He was a
            > prince and his father must have undoubtedly provided the best education
            > befitting royalty, with separate tutors for sanskrit, literature, music, the
            > shashtras, combat training in swordplay, archery, etc., economics
            > (artha-shaashtra), governance, diplomacy and so an as was customary.
            >
            > Metta.
            > __________________________________________________
            >
            >
            > On 1/6/07, keren_arbel <keren_arbel@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > Dear All,
            > >
            > > I would be happy to hear your knowledgeable opinion about "tracking" a
            > > Pali word from the Sanskrit one for understanding it meaning better.
            > > I see this method quite often in books and articles. The author try to
            > > understand the Pali word better by going to the Sanskrit verb or word.
            > > But since Pali might be a vencular language closly connected to Vedic
            > > rather than classical Sanskrit (and it meanings in the dictionary),
            > > and the unknown fact whether the Buddha new sanskrit at all, what is
            > > the significance of going to the Sanskrit?
            > >
            > > Thanks for any thoughts and ideas,
            > > Keren.
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Ole Holten Pind
            Dear Piya Tan, You find an excellent explanation at Saratthapakasini vol. II 34. According to the atthakatha, the purpose is to generate respect by not
            Message 5 of 10 , Jan 24, 2007
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              Dear Piya Tan,

              You find an excellent explanation at Saratthapakasini vol. II 34. According
              to the atthakatha, the purpose is to generate respect by not engaging in
              verbose conversation while on alms round. SImilar episodes are found
              elsewhere in the canon. It would be interesting to investigate the cultural
              background of the theme of answering thrice before getting an answer or
              asking the samequestion three times in a row and receiving the same answer
              each time.

              Regards,
              Ole Holten Pind

              _____

              Fra: Pali@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Pali@yahoogroups.com] På vegne af Piya Tan
              Sendt: 24. januar 2007 04:27
              Til: Pali@yahoogroups.com
              Emne: Re: [Pali] Sanskrit & Pal



              Sukhi hotu.

              Perhaps someone familiar with the Vinaya could help in this interesting case
              here:

              In *the Bahiya Sutta* (U 1.10) and *the Acela Kassapa Sutta* (S 12.17), the
              Buddha is asked thrice to teach the Dharma, but each time, he replies,
              "*This
              is not the proper time. We have entered amongst houses*."

              Buddhaghosa says that this is to gain respect from Acela Kassapa and also so
              that his knowledge would ripen (SA 2:35).
              Dhammapala, however, is more convincing in his detailed discussion, one
              explanation of which is that Bahiya is very excited on meeting the Buddha,
              who thrice says no mainly to calm him down before teaching Dharma (UA 90).

              What is interesting is that there is *no comment whatsoever (am I wrong
              here?) on the actual statement*, "*We are have entered amongst houses*"
              (antara,ghare pavi.t.thamha). This phrase and its variations are commonly
              found in the Vinaya esp the Sekhiya, and also in the Suttas.

              However, I have been unable to locate any Vinaya rule to the effect that a
              monk should not teach Dharma when "amongst houses," meaning with (1) not to
              teach Dharma in the streets, or (2) not to teach Dharma when on almsround,
              or both. Or, is there no such rule?

              Has anyone any insight on this interesting topic: I have also not found any
              teacher or scholar referring to his matter.

              This is part of my introductory notes to the Acela Kassapa Sutta
              translation.

              Metta and mudita,

              Piya Tan

              *The Minding Centre
              *Blk 644 Bukit Batok Central, #01-68 (2nd flr),
              [near Bukit Batok MRT/Interchange] Singapore 650644.
              *Minding Centre Website:
              http://mindcentre. <http://mindcentre.googlepages.com>
              googlepages.com<http://minding. <http://minding.centre.googlepages.com/>
              centre.googlepages.com/>
              *
              Dharmafarer website: http://dharmafarer.
              <http://dharmafarer.googlepages.com> googlepages.com
              HP: 8211 0879; Tel: 6569 5205

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • johnny pruitt
              Dear Piya Tan Is Sukhi Hotu commonly used as a greeting similar to hello? Mettacitena Johnny Piya Tan wrote:
              Message 6 of 10 , Jan 24, 2007
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                Dear Piya Tan
                Is Sukhi Hotu commonly used as a greeting similar to hello?
                Mettacitena
                Johnny

                Piya Tan <dharmafarer@...> wrote: Sukhi hotu.

                Perhaps someone familiar with the Vinaya could help in this interesting case
                here:

                In *the Bahiya Sutta* (U 1.10) and *the Acela Kassapa Sutta* (S 12.17), the
                Buddha is asked thrice to teach the Dharma, but each time, he replies, "*This
                is not the proper time. We have entered amongst houses*."

                Buddhaghosa says that this is to gain respect from Acela Kassapa and also so
                that his knowledge would ripen (SA 2:35).
                Dhammapala, however, is more convincing in his detailed discussion, one
                explanation of which is that Bahiya is very excited on meeting the Buddha,
                who thrice says no mainly to calm him down before teaching Dharma (UA 90).

                What is interesting is that there is *no comment whatsoever (am I wrong
                here?) on the actual statement*, "*We are have entered amongst houses*"
                (antara,ghare pavi.t.thamha). This phrase and its variations are commonly
                found in the Vinaya esp the Sekhiya, and also in the Suttas.

                However, I have been unable to locate any Vinaya rule to the effect that a
                monk should not teach Dharma when "amongst houses," meaning with (1) not to
                teach Dharma in the streets, or (2) not to teach Dharma when on almsround,
                or both. Or, is there no such rule?

                Has anyone any insight on this interesting topic: I have also not found any
                teacher or scholar referring to his matter.

                This is part of my introductory notes to the Acela Kassapa Sutta
                translation.

                Metta and mudita,

                Piya Tan

                *The Minding Centre
                *Blk 644 Bukit Batok Central, #01-68 (2nd flr),
                [near Bukit Batok MRT/Interchange] Singapore 650644.
                *Minding Centre Website:
                http://mindcentre.googlepages.com<http://minding.centre.googlepages.com/>
                *
                Dharmafarer website: http://dharmafarer.googlepages.com
                HP: 8211 0879; Tel: 6569 5205

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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              • Piya Tan
                Dear Johnny, Yes, sukhi hotu is a greeting, often sukhi (be happy!) for short. This is singular 2nd person. Use sukhi hontu when speaking to more than
                Message 7 of 10 , Jan 29, 2007
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                  Dear Johnny,

                  Yes, "sukhi hotu" is a greeting, often "sukhi" (be happy!) for short. This
                  is singular 2nd person.
                  Use "sukhi hontu" when speaking to more than one person: "may you both/all
                  be happy!"

                  Sukhi hotu.

                  Piya


                  On 1/25/07, johnny pruitt <mahasacham@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Dear Piya Tan
                  > Is Sukhi Hotu commonly used as a greeting similar to hello?
                  > Mettacitena
                  > Johnny
                  >
                  > Piya Tan <dharmafarer@... <dharmafarer%40gmail.com>> wrote: Sukhi
                  > hotu.
                  >
                  > Perhaps someone familiar with the Vinaya could help in this interesting
                  > case
                  > here:
                  >
                  > In *the Bahiya Sutta* (U 1.10) and *the Acela Kassapa Sutta* (S 12.17),
                  > the
                  > Buddha is asked thrice to teach the Dharma, but each time, he replies,
                  > "*This
                  > is not the proper time. We have entered amongst houses*."
                  >
                  > Buddhaghosa says that this is to gain respect from Acela Kassapa and also
                  > so
                  > that his knowledge would ripen (SA 2:35).
                  > Dhammapala, however, is more convincing in his detailed discussion, one
                  > explanation of which is that Bahiya is very excited on meeting the Buddha,
                  > who thrice says no mainly to calm him down before teaching Dharma (UA 90).
                  >
                  > What is interesting is that there is *no comment whatsoever (am I wrong
                  > here?) on the actual statement*, "*We are have entered amongst houses*"
                  > (antara,ghare pavi.t.thamha). This phrase and its variations are commonly
                  > found in the Vinaya esp the Sekhiya, and also in the Suttas.
                  >
                  > However, I have been unable to locate any Vinaya rule to the effect that a
                  > monk should not teach Dharma when "amongst houses," meaning with (1) not
                  > to
                  > teach Dharma in the streets, or (2) not to teach Dharma when on almsround,
                  > or both. Or, is there no such rule?
                  >
                  > Has anyone any insight on this interesting topic: I have also not found
                  > any
                  > teacher or scholar referring to his matter.
                  >
                  > This is part of my introductory notes to the Acela Kassapa Sutta
                  > translation.
                  >
                  > Metta and mudita,
                  >
                  > Piya Tan
                  >
                  > *The Minding Centre
                  > *Blk 644 Bukit Batok Central, #01-68 (2nd flr),
                  > [near Bukit Batok MRT/Interchange] Singapore 650644.
                  > *Minding Centre Website:
                  > http://mindcentre.googlepages.com<http://minding.centre.googlepages.com/>
                  > *
                  > Dharmafarer website: http://dharmafarer.googlepages.com
                  > HP: 8211 0879; Tel: 6569 5205
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ---------------------------------
                  > Don't be flakey. Get Yahoo! Mail for Mobile and
                  > always stay connected to friends.
                  >
                  > ---------------------------------
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                  > Get more visitors on your site using Yahoo! Search Marketing.
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • johnny pruitt
                  Dear Piya Tan Thanks so much for your explaination. Sorry all, for constantly asking questions that are of topic. This really helps. I was looking for a
                  Message 8 of 10 , Feb 1, 2007
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                    Dear Piya Tan
                    Thanks so much for your explaination. Sorry all, for constantly asking questions that are of topic. This really helps. I was looking for a greeting in pali but could not find one except for "svagaato hotu" which I believe means welcome.
                    Do you guys think that Pali might have a form for the Sanskrit "namaste"? it sounds like the verb namasati.

                    mettacittena
                    Johnny Pruitt
                    Piya Tan <dharmafarer@...> wrote: Dear Johnny,

                    Yes, "sukhi hotu" is a greeting, often "sukhi" (be happy!) for short. This
                    is singular 2nd person.
                    Use "sukhi hontu" when speaking to more than one person: "may you both/all
                    be happy!"

                    Sukhi hotu.

                    Piya

                    On 1/25/07, johnny pruitt <mahasacham@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Dear Piya Tan
                    > Is Sukhi Hotu commonly used as a greeting similar to hello?
                    > Mettacitena
                    > Johnny
                    >
                    > Piya Tan <dharmafarer@... <dharmafarer%40gmail.com>> wrote: Sukhi
                    > hotu.
                    >
                    > Perhaps someone familiar with the Vinaya could help in this interesting
                    > case
                    > here:
                    >
                    > In *the Bahiya Sutta* (U 1.10) and *the Acela Kassapa Sutta* (S 12.17),
                    > the
                    > Buddha is asked thrice to teach the Dharma, but each time, he replies,
                    > "*This
                    > is not the proper time. We have entered amongst houses*."
                    >
                    > Buddhaghosa says that this is to gain respect from Acela Kassapa and also
                    > so
                    > that his knowledge would ripen (SA 2:35).
                    > Dhammapala, however, is more convincing in his detailed discussion, one
                    > explanation of which is that Bahiya is very excited on meeting the Buddha,
                    > who thrice says no mainly to calm him down before teaching Dharma (UA 90).
                    >
                    > What is interesting is that there is *no comment whatsoever (am I wrong
                    > here?) on the actual statement*, "*We are have entered amongst houses*"
                    > (antara,ghare pavi.t.thamha). This phrase and its variations are commonly
                    > found in the Vinaya esp the Sekhiya, and also in the Suttas.
                    >
                    > However, I have been unable to locate any Vinaya rule to the effect that a
                    > monk should not teach Dharma when "amongst houses," meaning with (1) not
                    > to
                    > teach Dharma in the streets, or (2) not to teach Dharma when on almsround,
                    > or both. Or, is there no such rule?
                    >
                    > Has anyone any insight on this interesting topic: I have also not found
                    > any
                    > teacher or scholar referring to his matter.
                    >
                    > This is part of my introductory notes to the Acela Kassapa Sutta
                    > translation.
                    >
                    > Metta and mudita,
                    >
                    > Piya Tan
                    >
                    > *The Minding Centre
                    > *Blk 644 Bukit Batok Central, #01-68 (2nd flr),
                    > [near Bukit Batok MRT/Interchange] Singapore 650644.
                    > *Minding Centre Website:
                    > http://mindcentre.googlepages.com<http://minding.centre.googlepages.com/>
                    > *
                    > Dharmafarer website: http://dharmafarer.googlepages.com
                    > HP: 8211 0879; Tel: 6569 5205
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ---------------------------------
                    > Don't be flakey. Get Yahoo! Mail for Mobile and
                    > always stay connected to friends.
                    >
                    > ---------------------------------
                    > The fish are biting.
                    > Get more visitors on your site using Yahoo! Search Marketing.
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    >

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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                  • P G Dave
                    Dear Johnny, A small correction there: welcome wud be *svaagato* not svagaato. metta. ________________________________________ ... [Non-text portions of this
                    Message 9 of 10 , Feb 2, 2007
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                      Dear Johnny,

                      A small correction there:
                      welcome wud be *svaagato* not svagaato.
                      metta.
                      ________________________________________

                      On 2/2/07, johnny pruitt <mahasacham@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > Dear Piya Tan
                      > Thanks so much for your explaination. Sorry all, for constantly asking
                      > questions that are of topic. This really helps. I was looking for a greeting
                      > in pali but could not find one except for "svagaato hotu" which I believe
                      > means welcome.
                      > Do you guys think that Pali might have a form for the Sanskrit "namaste"?
                      > it sounds like the verb namasati.
                      >
                      > mettacittena
                      > Johnny Pruitt
                      > Piya Tan <dharmafarer@... <dharmafarer%40gmail.com>> wrote: Dear
                      > Johnny,
                      >
                      > Yes, "sukhi hotu" is a greeting, often "sukhi" (be happy!) for short. This
                      > is singular 2nd person.
                      > Use "sukhi hontu" when speaking to more than one person: "may you both/all
                      > be happy!"
                      >
                      > Sukhi hotu.
                      >
                      > Piya
                      >
                      > On 1/25/07, johnny pruitt <mahasacham@... <mahasacham%40yahoo.com>>
                      > wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Dear Piya Tan
                      > > Is Sukhi Hotu commonly used as a greeting similar to hello?
                      > > Mettacitena
                      > > Johnny
                      > >
                      > > Piya Tan <dharmafarer@... <dharmafarer%40gmail.com> <dharmafarer%
                      > 40gmail.com>> wrote: Sukhi
                      > > hotu.
                      > >
                      > > Perhaps someone familiar with the Vinaya could help in this interesting
                      > > case
                      > > here:
                      > >
                      > > In *the Bahiya Sutta* (U 1.10) and *the Acela Kassapa Sutta* (S 12.17),
                      > > the
                      > > Buddha is asked thrice to teach the Dharma, but each time, he replies,
                      > > "*This
                      > > is not the proper time. We have entered amongst houses*."
                      > >
                      > > Buddhaghosa says that this is to gain respect from Acela Kassapa and
                      > also
                      > > so
                      > > that his knowledge would ripen (SA 2:35).
                      > > Dhammapala, however, is more convincing in his detailed discussion, one
                      > > explanation of which is that Bahiya is very excited on meeting the
                      > Buddha,
                      > > who thrice says no mainly to calm him down before teaching Dharma (UA
                      > 90).
                      > >
                      > > What is interesting is that there is *no comment whatsoever (am I wrong
                      > > here?) on the actual statement*, "*We are have entered amongst houses*"
                      > > (antara,ghare pavi.t.thamha). This phrase and its variations are
                      > commonly
                      > > found in the Vinaya esp the Sekhiya, and also in the Suttas.
                      > >
                      > > However, I have been unable to locate any Vinaya rule to the effect that
                      > a
                      > > monk should not teach Dharma when "amongst houses," meaning with (1) not
                      > > to
                      > > teach Dharma in the streets, or (2) not to teach Dharma when on
                      > almsround,
                      > > or both. Or, is there no such rule?
                      > >
                      > > Has anyone any insight on this interesting topic: I have also not found
                      > > any
                      > > teacher or scholar referring to his matter.
                      > >
                      > > This is part of my introductory notes to the Acela Kassapa Sutta
                      > > translation.
                      > >
                      > > Metta and mudita,
                      > >
                      > > Piya Tan
                      > >
                      > > *The Minding Centre
                      > > *Blk 644 Bukit Batok Central, #01-68 (2nd flr),
                      > > [near Bukit Batok MRT/Interchange] Singapore 650644.
                      > > *Minding Centre Website:
                      > > http://mindcentre.googlepages.com<http://minding.centre.googlepages.com/
                      > >
                      > > *
                      > > Dharmafarer website: http://dharmafarer.googlepages.com
                      > > HP: 8211 0879; Tel: 6569 5205
                      > >
                      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
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