Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [Pali] Burmese names

Expand Messages
  • Piya Tan
    Thanks for the clarification, Dipankar. I get a better idea of these various modes of address. Piya. ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 13, 2006
      Thanks for the clarification, Dipankar.

      I get a better idea of these various modes of address.

      Piya.


      On 10/25/06, Dipankar Chakma <dipankaro@...> wrote:
      >
      > To rejoin with Piya Tan with respect to the name "Piya" I couldn't get
      > the sense unless it is "Phaya" or "paya" as it is referred to the Buddha and
      > to response when sb is called. It is ok with that of Piya so long as it is
      > bear dear, or dearable, or loveable in the sense of Pali Language.
      > With metta,
      > bhante
      > Piya Tan <dharmafarer@... <dharmafarer%40gmail.com>> wrote:
      > Thanks Htet Phoe & Lynette,
      >
      > Things are a bit clearer now. However, as Htet Phoe says that Myanmar
      > names
      > are unique, it is unlikely that the name SHWE ZAN AUNG has the surname as
      > final, Western style. Or, should it read Aung, Shwe Zan (as indexed in
      > biblio).
      >
      > Also I work in an increasing westernized situation here in Singapore, that
      > is, we have many lay Dharma teachers (incl lay meditation teachers), like
      > myself. A number of students have asked me how to address a senior lay
      > teacher (in English, that is). More traditional circles use sifu
      > (Chinese),
      > or sensei (Zen, Japanese), or "lama la" (Tibetan), or swami (Indian), but
      > English-speaking Singaporean are in the midst of sinking cultural roots.
      >
      > One reason for a need of proper address is to avoid caveperson lingo. For
      > example, when someone wishes to ask a question in class, and is not sure
      > if
      > they should address me by name (this is Asia!), they would into "Ah.." or
      > "Uggh.." Then I know I am addressed :)
      >
      > Half-jokingly, I told them to address me as "Piya" (my Pali name), with
      > which I feel quite comfortable as it avoids a sense of status in
      > status-conscious Singapore and Malaysia.
      >
      > Recently, I discovered that "Piya" in Myanmar actually has a meaning close
      > to Thai "tahn" (something like "sir"). Apparently, my name comprises two
      > of
      > the most common polite salutations of Thailand and Myanmar! Or so it
      > seems.
      >
      > My point is that if "Piya" is a polite salutation meaning something like
      > "sir," it should be suitable for addressing lay Dharma teachers (like
      > "Ajahn" in Thailand, which is used for both monastic and lay). Please
      > remember we are talking about Singapore (or perhaps modern Australian)
      > scenario with practising Buddhists.
      >
      > My question is: is "piya" a Myanmar salutation, and how is it used there?
      >
      > Thanks again.
      >
      > Piya
      >
      > On 10/19/06, Lynette Monteiro <lynettemonteiro@...<lynettemonteiro%40ottawamindfulnessclinic.com>
      > >
      > wrote:
      > >
      > > Dear Friends,
      > >
      > > I am new to the group and have been enjoying the exchanges. Thank you.
      > >
      > > Burmese names are a unit so there isn't a surname per se. However, the
      > > "last" name or family connect is placed first. "Aung Shwezan" makes more
      > > sense as (I think) "Aung" is more likely the surname. "Shwezan" would be
      > one
      > > unit so I don't think I'd use Shwe as an index.
      > >
      > > Metta,
      > > Lynette
      > >
      > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > From: Piya Tan
      > > To: Pali Yahoo Group
      > > Sent: Thursday, October 19, 2006 12:10 AM
      > > Subject: [Pali] Burmese names
      > >
      > > Friends,
      > >
      > > I hope some Myanmarese (Burmese) viewer could help me here about
      > > Burmese names. As I do not have the Library of Congress guide to
      > > book classification rules and guidelines, I am trying to figure out
      > > how to index Burmese name like
      > >
      > > SHWE ZAN AUNG
      > >
      > > (1) Do I enter the name as it is, as it is a unique name?
      > > (2) Or, is the surname AUNG, so that I should index it so.
      > >
      > > I notice most biblios index the name under AUNG, though I have a
      > > feeling it should be SHWE.
      > >
      > > Piya Tan
      > >
      > > ----------------------------------------------------------
      > >
      > > No virus found in this incoming message.
      > > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
      > > Version: 7.1.408 / Virus Database: 268.13.5/483 - Release Date:
      > 10/18/2006
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      > Send instant messages to your online friends http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com
      > Send instant messages to your online friends http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.