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Re: [Pali] Burmese names

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  • Lynette Monteiro
    Dear Friends, I am new to the group and have been enjoying the exchanges. Thank you. Burmese names are a unit so there isn t a surname per se. However, the
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 19, 2006
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      Dear Friends,

      I am new to the group and have been enjoying the exchanges. Thank you.

      Burmese names are a unit so there isn't a surname per se. However, the "last" name or family connect is placed first. "Aung Shwezan" makes more sense as (I think) "Aung" is more likely the surname. "Shwezan" would be one unit so I don't think I'd use Shwe as an index.

      Metta,
      Lynette




      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Piya Tan
      To: Pali Yahoo Group
      Sent: Thursday, October 19, 2006 12:10 AM
      Subject: [Pali] Burmese names


      Friends,

      I hope some Myanmarese (Burmese) viewer could help me here about
      Burmese names. As I do not have the Library of Congress guide to
      book classification rules and guidelines, I am trying to figure out
      how to index Burmese name like

      SHWE ZAN AUNG

      (1) Do I enter the name as it is, as it is a unique name?
      (2) Or, is the surname AUNG, so that I should index it so.

      I notice most biblios index the name under AUNG, though I have a
      feeling it should be SHWE.

      Piya Tan






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    • Piya Tan
      Thanks Htet Phoe & Lynette, Things are a bit clearer now. However, as Htet Phoe says that Myanmar names are unique, it is unlikely that the name SHWE ZAN AUNG
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 19, 2006
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        Thanks Htet Phoe & Lynette,

        Things are a bit clearer now. However, as Htet Phoe says that Myanmar names
        are unique, it is unlikely that the name SHWE ZAN AUNG has the surname as
        final, Western style. Or, should it read Aung, Shwe Zan (as indexed in
        biblio).

        Also I work in an increasing westernized situation here in Singapore, that
        is, we have many lay Dharma teachers (incl lay meditation teachers), like
        myself. A number of students have asked me how to address a senior lay
        teacher (in English, that is). More traditional circles use sifu (Chinese),
        or sensei (Zen, Japanese), or "lama la" (Tibetan), or swami (Indian), but
        English-speaking Singaporean are in the midst of sinking cultural roots.

        One reason for a need of proper address is to avoid caveperson lingo. For
        example, when someone wishes to ask a question in class, and is not sure if
        they should address me by name (this is Asia!), they would into "Ah.." or
        "Uggh.." Then I know I am addressed :)

        Half-jokingly, I told them to address me as "Piya" (my Pali name), with
        which I feel quite comfortable as it avoids a sense of status in
        status-conscious Singapore and Malaysia.

        Recently, I discovered that "Piya" in Myanmar actually has a meaning close
        to Thai "tahn" (something like "sir"). Apparently, my name comprises two of
        the most common polite salutations of Thailand and Myanmar! Or so it seems.

        My point is that if "Piya" is a polite salutation meaning something like
        "sir," it should be suitable for addressing lay Dharma teachers (like
        "Ajahn" in Thailand, which is used for both monastic and lay). Please
        remember we are talking about Singapore (or perhaps modern Australian)
        scenario with practising Buddhists.

        My question is: is "piya" a Myanmar salutation, and how is it used there?

        Thanks again.

        Piya



        On 10/19/06, Lynette Monteiro <lynettemonteiro@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Dear Friends,
        >
        > I am new to the group and have been enjoying the exchanges. Thank you.
        >
        > Burmese names are a unit so there isn't a surname per se. However, the
        > "last" name or family connect is placed first. "Aung Shwezan" makes more
        > sense as (I think) "Aung" is more likely the surname. "Shwezan" would be one
        > unit so I don't think I'd use Shwe as an index.
        >
        > Metta,
        > Lynette
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: Piya Tan
        > To: Pali Yahoo Group
        > Sent: Thursday, October 19, 2006 12:10 AM
        > Subject: [Pali] Burmese names
        >
        > Friends,
        >
        > I hope some Myanmarese (Burmese) viewer could help me here about
        > Burmese names. As I do not have the Library of Congress guide to
        > book classification rules and guidelines, I am trying to figure out
        > how to index Burmese name like
        >
        > SHWE ZAN AUNG
        >
        > (1) Do I enter the name as it is, as it is a unique name?
        > (2) Or, is the surname AUNG, so that I should index it so.
        >
        > I notice most biblios index the name under AUNG, though I have a
        > feeling it should be SHWE.
        >
        > Piya Tan
        >
        > ----------------------------------------------------------
        >
        > No virus found in this incoming message.
        > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
        > Version: 7.1.408 / Virus Database: 268.13.5/483 - Release Date: 10/18/2006
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Dipankar Chakma
        To rejoin with Piya Tan with respect to the name Piya I couldn t get the sense unless it is Phaya or paya as it is referred to the Buddha and to
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 24, 2006
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          To rejoin with Piya Tan with respect to the name "Piya" I couldn't get the sense unless it is "Phaya" or "paya" as it is referred to the Buddha and to response when sb is called. It is ok with that of Piya so long as it is bear dear, or dearable, or loveable in the sense of Pali Language.
          With metta,
          bhante
          Piya Tan <dharmafarer@...> wrote:
          Thanks Htet Phoe & Lynette,

          Things are a bit clearer now. However, as Htet Phoe says that Myanmar names
          are unique, it is unlikely that the name SHWE ZAN AUNG has the surname as
          final, Western style. Or, should it read Aung, Shwe Zan (as indexed in
          biblio).

          Also I work in an increasing westernized situation here in Singapore, that
          is, we have many lay Dharma teachers (incl lay meditation teachers), like
          myself. A number of students have asked me how to address a senior lay
          teacher (in English, that is). More traditional circles use sifu (Chinese),
          or sensei (Zen, Japanese), or "lama la" (Tibetan), or swami (Indian), but
          English-speaking Singaporean are in the midst of sinking cultural roots.

          One reason for a need of proper address is to avoid caveperson lingo. For
          example, when someone wishes to ask a question in class, and is not sure if
          they should address me by name (this is Asia!), they would into "Ah.." or
          "Uggh.." Then I know I am addressed :)

          Half-jokingly, I told them to address me as "Piya" (my Pali name), with
          which I feel quite comfortable as it avoids a sense of status in
          status-conscious Singapore and Malaysia.

          Recently, I discovered that "Piya" in Myanmar actually has a meaning close
          to Thai "tahn" (something like "sir"). Apparently, my name comprises two of
          the most common polite salutations of Thailand and Myanmar! Or so it seems.

          My point is that if "Piya" is a polite salutation meaning something like
          "sir," it should be suitable for addressing lay Dharma teachers (like
          "Ajahn" in Thailand, which is used for both monastic and lay). Please
          remember we are talking about Singapore (or perhaps modern Australian)
          scenario with practising Buddhists.

          My question is: is "piya" a Myanmar salutation, and how is it used there?

          Thanks again.

          Piya

          On 10/19/06, Lynette Monteiro <lynettemonteiro@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Dear Friends,
          >
          > I am new to the group and have been enjoying the exchanges. Thank you.
          >
          > Burmese names are a unit so there isn't a surname per se. However, the
          > "last" name or family connect is placed first. "Aung Shwezan" makes more
          > sense as (I think) "Aung" is more likely the surname. "Shwezan" would be one
          > unit so I don't think I'd use Shwe as an index.
          >
          > Metta,
          > Lynette
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: Piya Tan
          > To: Pali Yahoo Group
          > Sent: Thursday, October 19, 2006 12:10 AM
          > Subject: [Pali] Burmese names
          >
          > Friends,
          >
          > I hope some Myanmarese (Burmese) viewer could help me here about
          > Burmese names. As I do not have the Library of Congress guide to
          > book classification rules and guidelines, I am trying to figure out
          > how to index Burmese name like
          >
          > SHWE ZAN AUNG
          >
          > (1) Do I enter the name as it is, as it is a unique name?
          > (2) Or, is the surname AUNG, so that I should index it so.
          >
          > I notice most biblios index the name under AUNG, though I have a
          > feeling it should be SHWE.
          >
          > Piya Tan
          >
          > ----------------------------------------------------------
          >
          > No virus found in this incoming message.
          > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
          > Version: 7.1.408 / Virus Database: 268.13.5/483 - Release Date: 10/18/2006
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





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        • Piya Tan
          Thanks for the clarification, Dipankar. I get a better idea of these various modes of address. Piya. ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Message 4 of 6 , Nov 13, 2006
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            Thanks for the clarification, Dipankar.

            I get a better idea of these various modes of address.

            Piya.


            On 10/25/06, Dipankar Chakma <dipankaro@...> wrote:
            >
            > To rejoin with Piya Tan with respect to the name "Piya" I couldn't get
            > the sense unless it is "Phaya" or "paya" as it is referred to the Buddha and
            > to response when sb is called. It is ok with that of Piya so long as it is
            > bear dear, or dearable, or loveable in the sense of Pali Language.
            > With metta,
            > bhante
            > Piya Tan <dharmafarer@... <dharmafarer%40gmail.com>> wrote:
            > Thanks Htet Phoe & Lynette,
            >
            > Things are a bit clearer now. However, as Htet Phoe says that Myanmar
            > names
            > are unique, it is unlikely that the name SHWE ZAN AUNG has the surname as
            > final, Western style. Or, should it read Aung, Shwe Zan (as indexed in
            > biblio).
            >
            > Also I work in an increasing westernized situation here in Singapore, that
            > is, we have many lay Dharma teachers (incl lay meditation teachers), like
            > myself. A number of students have asked me how to address a senior lay
            > teacher (in English, that is). More traditional circles use sifu
            > (Chinese),
            > or sensei (Zen, Japanese), or "lama la" (Tibetan), or swami (Indian), but
            > English-speaking Singaporean are in the midst of sinking cultural roots.
            >
            > One reason for a need of proper address is to avoid caveperson lingo. For
            > example, when someone wishes to ask a question in class, and is not sure
            > if
            > they should address me by name (this is Asia!), they would into "Ah.." or
            > "Uggh.." Then I know I am addressed :)
            >
            > Half-jokingly, I told them to address me as "Piya" (my Pali name), with
            > which I feel quite comfortable as it avoids a sense of status in
            > status-conscious Singapore and Malaysia.
            >
            > Recently, I discovered that "Piya" in Myanmar actually has a meaning close
            > to Thai "tahn" (something like "sir"). Apparently, my name comprises two
            > of
            > the most common polite salutations of Thailand and Myanmar! Or so it
            > seems.
            >
            > My point is that if "Piya" is a polite salutation meaning something like
            > "sir," it should be suitable for addressing lay Dharma teachers (like
            > "Ajahn" in Thailand, which is used for both monastic and lay). Please
            > remember we are talking about Singapore (or perhaps modern Australian)
            > scenario with practising Buddhists.
            >
            > My question is: is "piya" a Myanmar salutation, and how is it used there?
            >
            > Thanks again.
            >
            > Piya
            >
            > On 10/19/06, Lynette Monteiro <lynettemonteiro@...<lynettemonteiro%40ottawamindfulnessclinic.com>
            > >
            > wrote:
            > >
            > > Dear Friends,
            > >
            > > I am new to the group and have been enjoying the exchanges. Thank you.
            > >
            > > Burmese names are a unit so there isn't a surname per se. However, the
            > > "last" name or family connect is placed first. "Aung Shwezan" makes more
            > > sense as (I think) "Aung" is more likely the surname. "Shwezan" would be
            > one
            > > unit so I don't think I'd use Shwe as an index.
            > >
            > > Metta,
            > > Lynette
            > >
            > > ----- Original Message -----
            > > From: Piya Tan
            > > To: Pali Yahoo Group
            > > Sent: Thursday, October 19, 2006 12:10 AM
            > > Subject: [Pali] Burmese names
            > >
            > > Friends,
            > >
            > > I hope some Myanmarese (Burmese) viewer could help me here about
            > > Burmese names. As I do not have the Library of Congress guide to
            > > book classification rules and guidelines, I am trying to figure out
            > > how to index Burmese name like
            > >
            > > SHWE ZAN AUNG
            > >
            > > (1) Do I enter the name as it is, as it is a unique name?
            > > (2) Or, is the surname AUNG, so that I should index it so.
            > >
            > > I notice most biblios index the name under AUNG, though I have a
            > > feeling it should be SHWE.
            > >
            > > Piya Tan
            > >
            > > ----------------------------------------------------------
            > >
            > > No virus found in this incoming message.
            > > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
            > > Version: 7.1.408 / Virus Database: 268.13.5/483 - Release Date:
            > 10/18/2006
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            > Send instant messages to your online friends http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com
            > Send instant messages to your online friends http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >


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