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Re: Itthi & Matugama

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  • Ong Yong Peng
    Dear Rahula, those who studies the founding history of Buddhism would have come to know that Ananda is kind of a champion for women, a rare example of its kind
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 30, 2006
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      Dear Rahula,

      those who studies the founding history of Buddhism would have come to
      know that Ananda is kind of a champion for women, a rare example of
      its kind at a time centuries before the modern Woman's Rights
      movement, a result of The Enlightenment (or Modernism) movement.

      It was Rahula who persuaded the Buddha into allowing women to enter
      the Sangha, on the very basis that women have equal potential as men
      to obtain Nibbana.

      Your doubts is about the answer Buddha gave to Ananda. At times, when
      we read the suttas, we have to understand that the Buddha is saying
      the "conventional truth", i.e. what is acceptable at his time, _not_
      the "ultimate truth", i.e. women can do equally well if given equal
      opportunities as men.

      The reason for this is a multi-faceted issue, which requires
      professional research and deserves a book in its own right.

      You may have noted that Ananda was not able to take the issue further
      with the Buddha, as he did with the bhikkhuni issue. The Buddha, as
      the head of the Sangha, was able to agree on admitting women to the
      order. However, the Buddha has no say about allowing women to be a
      professional, judge or foreign diplomat.

      If a woman is given the same opportunity in education and work, I am
      sure she has equal chances of excelling, and henceforth dismisses the
      misconceptions a male-dominated society has about its womenfolk.


      metta,
      Yong Peng.


      --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, rahula_80 wrote:

      ânanda, a woman is given to anger. ânanda, woman is envious. ânanda, a
      woman is greedy. ânanda, woman is poor in wisdom. This is the reason,
      ânanda, this is the cause, why women-folk do not preside in a court of
      justice, nor engage in an occupation, nor go to a foreign country."
    • Ong Yong Peng
      Dear friends, I must be thinking of the movie s title An Inconvenient Truth . What I meant is that the Buddha s teachings can be either /conventional/
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 2, 2006
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        Dear friends,

        I must be thinking of the movie's title "An Inconvenient Truth".

        What I meant is that the Buddha's teachings can be either
        /conventional/ teachings or /ultimate/ teachings. This is widely
        recognised in all Buddhist schools. It is a non-dogmatic
        characteristic of the Buddha's teachings, which can be difficult for
        people from a non-Buddhist background to comprehend.

        On the other hand, there may be some others who think this is not
        /conventional/, but unauthentic, and probably a later addition. This
        is possible, and Buddhists have no problem if it can be shown this
        passage is really not authentic. Until then, it shall not be used to
        avoid a meaningful discussion.

        A good example is the case of bhikkhuni ordination. Buddhism is the
        first religion in the world to endorse and give official recognition
        to women taking up religious oaths. We may extend this discussion if
        someone like to deliberate on this case, or cite other examples.


        metta,
        Yong Peng.


        --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, Ong Yong Peng wrote:

        At times, when we read the suttas, we have to understand that the
        Buddha is saying the "conventional truth", i.e. what is acceptable at
        his time, _not_ the "ultimate truth", i.e. women can do equally well
        if given equal opportunities as men.
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