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Re: The Buddha as omniscient

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  • lighthisertim
    ... Hi, Jaini, Padmanabh S. “On the Sarvanatva of Mahavira and the Buddha.” Collected Papers on Buddhist Studies. Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass
    Message 1 of 19 , Jun 1, 2006
      --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, "keren_arbel" <keren_arbel@...> wrote:

      > I'm looking for the Pali word for omniscient, and maybe a reference...?

      Hi,

      Jaini, Padmanabh S. “On the Sarvanatva of Mahavira and the Buddha.” Collected Papers on
      Buddhist Studies. Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass Publishers. 2001. 97â€" 121.

      hth,

      Tim Lighthiser
    • joseph
      ... Buddhism. ... Buddha s ... Hello friends theres an article here http://www.buddhanet.net/budsas/ebud/ebdha234.htm (my only reserevation is that The Theory
      Message 2 of 19 , Jun 6, 2006
        --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, "Stephen Hodge" <s.hodge@...> wrote:
        >
        > Dear Bhante Dhammanando,
        >
        > > the Sandaka Sutta ... discussion of sabba~n~nutaa in Pali
        Buddhism.
        > I am not sure how this gives much help with the question of a
        Buddha's
        > "omniscience". Could you indulge me and spell things out a bit ?
        >
        > > If anyone is interested in how this problem has been handled
        > > in western thought, there are four fine articles ...
        >
        > Thank you for these interesting URLs -- lots of reading there.
        >
        > Best wishes,
        > Stephen Hodge
        >


        Hello friends
        theres an article here

        http://www.buddhanet.net/budsas/ebud/ebdha234.htm
        (my only reserevation is that The Theory of Quantum Mechanics'
        which seem to establish That
        We perceive only our pre-conceived `givens'
        is actually science,
        although probably Different from the popular notion of it.)

        I wish to thanks The Venerable Dhammanando
        and hope The Venerable will not consider it improper
        as I tried some answer too:

        Free Will and Freedom
        Lessons from the Sandaka Sutta (M.N. 67) – The discourse with
        Sandaka

        In the Discourse, The Venerable Ananda , probably as a response to
        the Wanderer's lack of discipline, Explains about choices.
        Eight major ways that negate the holy life:

        Four kinds of `holy life without consolation'
        Since the fruit of these practices are not different from lay life.
        These ways may be accepted even in contemporary society
        And probably reflect more on the long term karmic effects.

        1 no reward for good deeds
        2 no retribution for evil.
        3 no merit, no purification possible, no cause, no effect.
        4 The universe is determined, as shown in varied speculations about
        the natural and the supernatural, no individuality or personal
        development is possible, one's Kamma is utterly fixed and
        unalterable.

        All these ways are based on wrong view, which is wrong knowledge,
        wrong assumptions about reality, hence, any application of choice
        does not make any sense. And do not leave any meaning to a `free
        choice'.

        Further four ways that `a wise man would certainly not live the
        holy life
        Or will not attain', thereby.
        The faults of this second group are more obvious, can be easily
        noticed in casual
        Encounter and easily rejected.
        As `free choice', obviously, has to be an intelligent one as well.

        1 abandonment, no understanding of cause and effect, one is driven
        by destiny alone.
        2 adherences to tradition, no freedom, as some ideas and observances
        are right, some are wrong.
        3 same, but based on logic, same results.
        4 skeptic, a denial of any possibility of positive knowledge or
        development.

        Next, the Buddhist path is expounded, with its fruit and benefits.

        The Dhamma leads one on' and that takes heart and faith.
        Faith is caused by suffering (and/or the understanding of the first
        noble truth)
        `Dhukha pahoti Saddha' (UpanisaSutta)

        `Self will' raises the question of a self,
        `selfless ness' – `Anatta' as a fundamental `emptiness' -
        No center, no possibility of control, no tenable position.

        "Dhammata' is the natural way,
        A different choice surely indicates a delusional mind.

        `Freedom is a choiceless state' (J. Krishnamurth),

        This point, which we try to investigate, is questioned further by
        Sandaka.
        In the form of three questions, all deeply concerning the subject of
        free choice:

        1 an arahat can never transgress,
        And by interpretation,
        The Five percepts, the primary `choice' of a Buddhist,
        Are, then, simulations of the `Normal Mind'.

        2 The second, by extension, is that an accomplished one
        Knows a fact only when he puts his mind to it.
        (a direct answer to the omnisience question, although only a variant
        of an answer we allready had)

        3 the third is about the `emancipators' – `Niyyaataaro'
        The creation of Sankharas – mental determinations – is described as
        "By oneself or influenced by others",
        The inquiry, discipline and practice generate
        .`KussalaDhammaa - Wholesome mind objects' as the cause of
        liberation.

        Metta
        Jothiko

        What lies behind us and what lies before us are small matters
        compared to what lies within us." Ralph Waldo Emerson
      • Dhammanando Bhikkhu
        Dear Stephen, Sorry for the late reply. I have not been reading the posts for some time. ... I m inclined to agree, it really doesn t help at all. The reason I
        Message 3 of 19 , Jul 18, 2006
          Dear Stephen,

          Sorry for the late reply. I have not been reading the posts
          for some time.

          Dhammanando:
          >> I am surprised that no one has yet mentioned the Sandaka Sutta
          >> (MN 76). This would surely be the obvious starting point for
          >> any discussion of sabba~n~nutaa in Pali Buddhism.

          Stephen Hodge:
          > I am not sure how this gives much help with the question of
          > a Buddha's "omniscience".

          I'm inclined to agree, it really doesn't help at all. The reason
          I called it "the obvious starting point for a discussion" is not
          because it helps but because in my experience most discussions on
          this topic DO in fact start by somebody citing the Sandaka Sutta
          as negative evidence against the omniscience claims made in the
          Pa.tisambhidaamagga, Milindapa~nhaa and Commentaries. Of course
          they have to interpret the sutta in their own way rather than the
          Pali commentaries' way in order to claim that it supports their
          position. As a result, much of the discussion of sabba~n~nutaa
          comes down in the end to a wrangle about just how the Sandaka
          Sutta should be read. In the traditional reading it is assumed
          that the Buddha is ridiculing only the omniscience claims of
          titthiya teachers; but certain modern scholars (Jayatilleke and
          Kalupahana come to mind) read the sutta as ridiculing the very
          idea of omniscience.

          Best wishes,
          Dhammanando
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