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16080Re: pali onomatopoeia index?

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  • venkumara
    Aug 24, 2013
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      I do agree that such a list would the helpful for beginners. It also makes learning more fun.

      Frank, I suggest that you post this on the Pali section of DhammaWheel, and invite others to add to the list.


      --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, Bryan Levman <bryan.levman@...> wrote:
      >
      > Dear Frank,
      >
      > That is a good observation. Murray Emeneau, A Canadian born linguist specializing in south Asian languages, recognized the same phenomenon and wrote about it in
      >
      > M. B. Emeneau, "Onomatopoetics in the Indian Linguistic Area. ", Language, 45 (1969): 274-99. Also Available in Anwar S. Dil,  Language and Linguistic Area (Stanford: Stanford University Press), 250-293.
      >
      > He points out that it is found in Dravidian and Munda languages (indigenous languages of India) as well as Middle Indic (i. e. Indo-Aryan languages of Indo European ancestry, i. e. that came originally from outside of India) languages like Pali. He argues that it is a pan-Indic trait, a feature of the Indian linguistic area (also called "Sprachbund"). On page 269-289 he gives a list of onomatopoetic words found in Dravidian and Indo-Aryan that you can look at. Some Skt. and Pali examples he gives are
      >
      > budbuda, "bubble"
      > miṇmiṇa, "speaking indistinctly throught the nose"
      > murumurā "crackling"
      > baḍabaḍai, "laments" (Prakrit)
      > gaḍavaḍa "confusion" (Prakrit)
      > Skt. gargara >P. gaggara, (“roaring”)
      >
      > Skt. bharabhara > P. babbhara ( “a confused,
      > rumbling sound”) ,
      >
      > Pāli cicciṭāyati (“hiss”, “fizz”, “sizzle”),
      >
      > to name a few. Prakrit is a form of Middle Indic (of the Indo-Aryan group like Pali).
      >
      > Some dictionaries may mention that a word is believed to be OP, but they are never consistent, because it is a personal thing whether a word sounds OP or not. It would certainly be a valuable contribution to try and compile such a list,
      >
      > Metta, Bryan
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: frank k <fcckuan@...>
      > To: pali@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Tuesday, July 24, 2012 1:39:53 PM
      > Subject: [Pali] pali onomatopoeia index?
      >
      >
      >  
      > Dear Pali friends,
      >
      > As I've been picking up new pali vocabulary, I've noticed possible
      > onomatopoeia (words that sound like or suggest what they are). I'll
      > abbreviate as OP from here on . Does there exist any compilation of such
      > OP's, or do any dictionaries confirm whether a word is an OP?
      >
      > Here are a few words flipping through pali primer that seem like OP:
      >
      > hasati : laughs, "ha!"
      > kakaca: saw (noun) makes a sound like "kakaca"
      > chindati: cuts ("chin" is a cutting sound)
      > patati: falls (i picture the sound of someone falling down the stairs)
      > kāka: crow (doesn't a crow make a "kaw" sound?)
      >
      > If such a compilation does not exist, perhaps we can create a wiki page to
      > compile suspected OP's?
      > Such a list would be very useful for beginners who want to pick up some
      > easier words to add to their vocabulary.
      >
      > On a related note, does such a compilation or list exist for pali words
      > that are easy to learn due to common indo-european root, for examples
      > "pundit" <=>"pandita"?
      > "māta" <=> mamma (mother)?
      >
      > Metta,
      > Frank
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
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