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  • Naeem Sarwar
    hi alls, I don t know up to what level realistically we can implement this idea but I strongly believe that by implementation we can give a better message to
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 1, 2007
      hi alls,
       

      I don't know up to what level realistically we can implement this idea but I strongly believe that by implementation we can give a better message to army to remain in limits. Let's start boycotting the products made be PAK ARMY. Doing so I believe that we can force them to focus on the main goal and aim of having such a big expensive army and we can sleep peacefully and safely instead of worrying about our country.  

       

      Can any one provide the list of major products made by Pak army? If not then lets start building it.

       

      This email is wrote just for a better Pakistan, neither against any person not Army. So please take positive look on this idea.

       

      Here below Including some of the articles,

       

      "As a former soldier I find myself greatly embarrassed when my civilian friends ask me to name just three other countries where armies take part in commercial activities. I am mortified when I rack my brains and can only come up with the name of Egypt whose army reportedly runs at least one hotel in Cairo"

       

      " Lt. General Zarrar Azim, known in the real estate world of Lahore as General Zarrar Zamin (land)."

       

      " According to a going joke in the Army Mess Circuit, the last request General Musharraf made to Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh in Delhi was to give him 8,000 acres of land from the Indian territory across the Wagah-Atari border, 30 miles from Lahore, in return for Kashmir and Siachin, because "my boys have already sold this land in the files."

      Lahore is not the only Land of Land Scams. What has happened in Gwadar and Rawalpindi is of no less import."

       

       

      Business as usual

      Dr. Ayesha Siddiqa

      Since October 8th, nothing seems to happen in Pakistan except for relief work. Even drawing room discussions are restricted to debate about relief and reconstruction. One had even begun to wonder if life would ever get back to a normal pace. However, with the latest news of Pakistan finalising negotiations for the purchase of a few military aircraft days after the quake, one heaved a sigh of relief. At least, somewhere it is business  as usual.

      Interestingly, the government did not disclose the news of the purchase of six Saab 2000 surveillance aircraft fitted with Erickson Erieye radar. The deal is worth 8.3 billion SEK. Converted in Pak rupees this amounts to Rs 66.4 billion. The news of the deal was brought to light by some insignificant Swedish newspaper.

      The Swedish manufacturer claimed that the aircraft were being purchased by the PAF to contribute to the earthquake relief effort. The aircraft can also perform search and rescue mission. According to the Director Public Relations (PAF), who confirmed the news, the deal is culmination of more than a yearlong series of negotiations. It must be mentioned that the General-President Musharraf had gone to Sweden in July last year to discuss the purchase of these aircraft along with JAS-39 Grippen fighter aircraft. One of the reasons for the delay in finalising of negotiations was the PAF's indecision regarding the selection of the platform for the Erickson radar. Islamabad is keen to acquire this technology for better surveillance across the border.

      The Erieye radar is considered comparable to the American Airborne Early Warning Aircraft (AWAC). The aircraft would give advance information regarding any enemy troop movement or threatening military regrouping. Such information, the readers must be reminded, is essential for the security of the people of Pakistan, especially Kashmiris. Pakistan has fought numerous wars for the rights of the Kashmiri people, and this purchase is another indicator of Islamabad's commitment to national security. The objective of this deal is primarily to beef up military security.

      So, one would like to challenge the assertion made by the Swedish manufacturer regarding the focus of the deal being search and rescue in Kashmir.

      Such a suggestion is absolutely ridiculous due to the simple fact that the aircraft are not likely to be delivered before a year and a half. The helpless people that are stuck in high mountains and unfriendly terrain need help in the next 48 hours rather than the coming 356-547 days. Also, these are fixed-wing aircraft that can detect movement in hazardous terrain, but will be completely useless in retrieving people stuck in the mountains. Thus, it will be difficult to convince these people of the logic of national security as envisioned by the GHQ, the AHQ or the NHQ. For these people, what is paramount is to save their lives and have food and shelter. At best, Islamabad urgently needs to hire helicopters to reach to the people that have not received any help as yet.

      The UN's predictions about the disaster about to strike Pakistan are horrifying. According to the World Food Program, there is a threat of starvation of approximately 2.3 million people. In addition, there is the threat of the outbreak of epidemics. Irrespective of the World Bank calculations the fact is that poverty has multiplied in the country due to the loss of assets and opportunities. Providing relief to these hungry and destitute people, and reconstructing their lives is a Herculean task requiring both efforts and resources. Musharraf himself has spoken about the cost of reconstruction exceeding US $5 billion.

      Surely, things would be better if the international community were to provide a helping hand. The comity of nations, especially the developed countries have not proved to be generous. They merely coughed out about US $500 million that will probably be divided between relief and reconstruction. This is hardly the amount that would put the lives of these homeless people back on track.

      While castigating the international community, one cannot but feel a sense of anger and frustration over Stockholm's decision to offer these aircraft. One wonders if the Swedish government, otherwise known for flagging human rights issues, would shamelessly sell aircraft to a country where millions of people face death, starvation and destitution. Referring to the international community, one suddenly understands the lack of enthusiasm regarding relief aid for Pakistan. After all, why should the world take the tab for Kashmir's reconstruction while Islamabad is busy buying modern military aircraft? Moreover, is the world morally obligated to provide aid to a nuclear weapon state that can produce various types of short and long-range missiles?

      The negotiations for the aircraft have just been finalised and it will take some days before a contract is drawn. From a financial standpoint, Pakistan will not have to pay the lump sum but deposit around 10 percent of the amount that itself amounts to Rs 7.2 billion. This will further drain foreign exchange reserve that has depleted from US $12 billion to US$ 11.2 billion. One would like to put the onus of this decision on the World Bank and the financial gurus according to whom the economic conditions of the country will not worsen after the quake. The planes of Punjab and Sindh that are the breadbasket have not been affected from the earthquake.

      Furthermore, with resources pouring into the country from abroad and collected within, the economy will get a boost, especially in the short to medium term. Considering such projections, one can conclude that the decision-makers were tongue-tied and hypnotised into not appreciating the broader implications of making expensive military hardware purchases, particularly at this juncture. How else could the President and his cabal appreciate the fact that the destruction in Kashmir will enhance the overall poverty in the country?

      It is even sadder to realise that this is a 'sneak decision.' Despite that the negotiations were concluded with the intent of finalising a deal a few days after the earthquake, the news was kept a secret. It is assumed that people will not come to know of the purchase and the parliamentarians will gloss over the increase in the defense budget. Even if some hue and cry is raised, all criticism will be brushed aside in the name of national security. After all, it is highly important to provide security to the Kashmiris that otherwise cannot be delivered from cold and starvation due to lack of resources.

      A pragmatist or strategic-realist will surely argue in favour of purchasing the aircraft. The earthquake has not changed certain realities such as a nuclear Pakistan's need to beef up its conventional weapons capabilities, or the threat from India. Nonetheless, the sad reality is that the people that are the object of this security are out in the cold feeling helpless and insecure because they do not have shelter, warm clothing, medicine and food. There are hundreds and thousands of people, especially youngsters that have been amputated and will be crippled for life. Such people need facilities to be able to live. Moreover, thousands of children have become orphans. Kids need rehabilitation including shelter and education.

      Whatever the nature of military threat, the top decision-makers have to realise the need for reorienting the state's policies. Indubitably, it is important to be pragmatic, but then pragmatism has varied perspectives: policies could be driven either by the concern for an organisation or the betterment of the masses. Today, more than ever, there is the need for the state to remain relevant for the common man in the country. Perhaps, reconsidering the decision to purchase the aircraft would be a signal that the people on top are sensitive towards the needs of the man on the street.

      --
      Naeem Sarwar
      "Obstacles are those frightful things you see When you take  your eyes off your goal"

       

    • Imran Sohail
      Hi I am agree with my respected brother, that Army should not have any role in presence of competent politicians. And every isitutions to work within his own
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 1, 2007
        Hi
         
        I am agree with my respected brother, that Army should not have any role in presence of competent politicians. And every isitutions to work within his own limits. So we also needs to start to give the solution along highlighting the problems. As far as my knowledge is concern Pak Army is not producing anything but Fouji Fondation (Trust) is in the market with different businesses and may be gaining differenct subsidaries from the government.  Anywho let start listing the products.
         
        1.  Fauji Fertilizer Net Pofit this year   Rs. 4,873 million (so we also need to higlitht the alternative and see that in which direction alternative company use the profits and who will be take benefit. In the present most of it going to retired army personnel (Pakistani Nationals)
        2. Education Stipend paid to 70,000 individuals and disperses over Rs. 120 million per year. (It needs to highlight what will be the alternatives body as in these individuals most of the the peole belong to poor or Middle class background and getting education.)
        I am not higligting these things with biasnesses but to brain storming for different improvements and alternatives.
         
        Thanks
        Imran Sohail

        Naeem Sarwar <naeemsarwar@...> wrote:
        hi alls,
         
        I don't know up to what level realistically we can implement this idea but I strongly believe that by implementation we can give a better message to army to remain in limits. Let's start boycotting the products made be PAK ARMY. Doing so I believe that we can force them to focus on the main goal and aim of having such a big expensive army and we can sleep peacefully and safely instead of worrying about our country.  
         
        Can any one provide the list of major products made by Pak army? If not then lets start building it.
         
        This email is wrote just for a better Pakistan, neither against any person not Army. So please take positive look on this idea.
         
        Here below Including some of the articles,
         
        "As a former soldier I find myself greatly embarrassed when my civilian friends ask me to name just three other countries where armies take part in commercial activities. I am mortified when I rack my brains and can only come up with the name of Egypt whose army reportedly runs at least one hotel in Cairo"
         
        " Lt. General Zarrar Azim, known in the real estate world of Lahore as General Zarrar Zamin (land)."
         
        " According to a going joke in the Army Mess Circuit, the last request General Musharraf made to Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh in Delhi was to give him 8,000 acres of land from the Indian territory across the Wagah-Atari border, 30 miles from Lahore, in return for Kashmir and Siachin, because "my boys have already sold this land in the files."
        Lahore is not the only Land of Land Scams. What has happened in Gwadar and Rawalpindi is of no less import."
         
         
        Business as usual
        Dr. Ayesha Siddiqa
        Since October 8th, nothing seems to happen in Pakistan except for relief work. Even drawing room discussions are restricted to debate about relief and reconstruction. One had even begun to wonder if life would ever get back to a normal pace. However, with the latest news of Pakistan finalising negotiations for the purchase of a few military aircraft days after the quake, one heaved a sigh of relief. At least, somewhere it is business  as usual.
        Interestingly, the government did not disclose the news of the purchase of six Saab 2000 surveillance aircraft fitted with Erickson Erieye radar. The deal is worth 8.3 billion SEK. Converted in Pak rupees this amounts to Rs 66.4 billion. The news of the deal was brought to light by some insignificant Swedish newspaper.
        The Swedish manufacturer claimed that the aircraft were being purchased by the PAF to contribute to the earthquake relief effort. The aircraft can also perform search and rescue mission. According to the Director Public Relations (PAF), who confirmed the news, the deal is culmination of more than a yearlong series of negotiations. It must be mentioned that the General-President Musharraf had gone to Sweden in July last year to discuss the purchase of these aircraft along with JAS-39 Grippen fighter aircraft. One of the reasons for the delay in finalising of negotiations was the PAF's indecision regarding the selection of the platform for the Erickson radar. Islamabad is keen to acquire this technology for better surveillance across the border.
        The Erieye radar is considered comparable to the American Airborne Early Warning Aircraft (AWAC). The aircraft would give advance information regarding any enemy troop movement or threatening military regrouping. Such information, the readers must be reminded, is essential for the security of the people of Pakistan, especially Kashmiris. Pakistan has fought numerous wars for the rights of the Kashmiri people, and this purchase is another indicator of Islamabad's commitment to national security. The objective of this deal is primarily to beef up military security.
        So, one would like to challenge the assertion made by the Swedish manufacturer regarding the focus of the deal being search and rescue in Kashmir.
        Such a suggestion is absolutely ridiculous due to the simple fact that the aircraft are not likely to be delivered before a year and a half. The helpless people that are stuck in high mountains and unfriendly terrain need help in the next 48 hours rather than the coming 356-547 days. Also, these are fixed-wing aircraft that can detect movement in hazardous terrain, but will be completely useless in retrieving people stuck in the mountains. Thus, it will be difficult to convince these people of the logic of national security as envisioned by the GHQ, the AHQ or the NHQ. For these people, what is paramount is to save their lives and have food and shelter. At best, Islamabad urgently needs to hire helicopters to reach to the people that have not received any help as yet.
        The UN's predictions about the disaster about to strike Pakistan are horrifying. According to the World Food Program, there is a threat of starvation of approximately 2.3 million people. In addition, there is the threat of the outbreak of epidemics. Irrespective of the World Bank calculations the fact is that poverty has multiplied in the country due to the loss of assets and opportunities. Providing relief to these hungry and destitute people, and reconstructing their lives is a Herculean task requiring both efforts and resources. Musharraf himself has spoken about the cost of reconstruction exceeding US $5 billion.
        Surely, things would be better if the international community were to provide a helping hand. The comity of nations, especially the developed countries have not proved to be generous. They merely coughed out about US $500 million that will probably be divided between relief and reconstruction. This is hardly the amount that would put the lives of these homeless people back on track.
        While castigating the international community, one cannot but feel a sense of anger and frustration over Stockholm's decision to offer these aircraft. One wonders if the Swedish government, otherwise known for flagging human rights issues, would shamelessly sell aircraft to a country where millions of people face death, starvation and destitution. Referring to the international community, one suddenly understands the lack of enthusiasm regarding relief aid for Pakistan. After all, why should the world take the tab for Kashmir's reconstruction while Islamabad is busy buying modern military aircraft? Moreover, is the world morally obligated to provide aid to a nuclear weapon state that can produce various types of short and long-range missiles?
        The negotiations for the aircraft have just been finalised and it will take some days before a contract is drawn. From a financial standpoint, Pakistan will not have to pay the lump sum but deposit around 10 percent of the amount that itself amounts to Rs 7.2 billion. This will further drain foreign exchange reserve that has depleted from US $12 billion to US$ 11.2 billion. One would like to put the onus of this decision on the World Bank and the financial gurus according to whom the economic conditions of the country will not worsen after the quake. The planes of Punjab and Sindh that are the breadbasket have not been affected from the earthquake.
        Furthermore, with resources pouring into the country from abroad and collected within, the economy will get a boost, especially in the short to medium term. Considering such projections, one can conclude that the decision-makers were tongue-tied and hypnotised into not appreciating the broader implications of making expensive military hardware purchases, particularly at this juncture. How else could the President and his cabal appreciate the fact that the destruction in Kashmir will enhance the overall poverty in the country?
        It is even sadder to realise that this is a 'sneak decision.' Despite that the negotiations were concluded with the intent of finalising a deal a few days after the earthquake, the news was kept a secret. It is assumed that people will not come to know of the purchase and the parliamentarians will gloss over the increase in the defense budget. Even if some hue and cry is raised, all criticism will be brushed aside in the name of national security. After all, it is highly important to provide security to the Kashmiris that otherwise cannot be delivered from cold and starvation due to lack of resources.
        A pragmatist or strategic-realist will surely argue in favour of purchasing the aircraft. The earthquake has not changed certain realities such as a nuclear Pakistan's need to beef up its conventional weapons capabilities, or the threat from India. Nonetheless, the sad reality is that the people that are the object of this security are out in the cold feeling helpless and insecure because they do not have shelter, warm clothing, medicine and food. There are hundreds and thousands of people, especially youngsters that have been amputated and will be crippled for life. Such people need facilities to be able to live. Moreover, thousands of children have become orphans. Kids need rehabilitation including shelter and education.
        Whatever the nature of military threat, the top decision-makers have to realise the need for reorienting the state's policies. Indubitably, it is important to be pragmatic, but then pragmatism has varied perspectives: policies could be driven either by the concern for an organisation or the betterment of the masses. Today, more than ever, there is the need for the state to remain relevant for the common man in the country. Perhaps, reconsidering the decision to purchase the aircraft would be a signal that the people on top are sensitive towards the needs of the man on the street.
        --
        Naeem Sarwar
        "Obstacles are those frightful things you see When you take  your eyes off your goal"
         

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