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Chris's surgery...

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  • De
    WOW!  Chris you would have told you everything they didn t tell you I have to won didn t tell you all of it because they ve had people not show up whengiven
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 21, 2009
      WOW!  Chris you would have told you everything they didn't tell you I have to won didn't tell you all of it because they've had people not show up whengiven it more than a thought or two if it were me!  I hope your eye heals well and no other surgeries are needed.  Please keep us posted on how things are going with your eye and if you have to have surgery on the other one.
       
        You are 100% correct when you said that "Geezers are stuborn old coots for a reason" they have to be because if they were no one would pay attention to them or do anything for them.  They have to have a voice all their own so they can sit up and be counted...there are many Vets that have fallen through the cracks and if they wouldn't have been as stubborn as they are they would have been forgotten about long ago...that is something that we as a nation should be ashamed about! 
       
        Take it wasy and glad to hear that you are home...like I said keep us posted on how you are doing and how your eyes are doing.
       
        I send you all love, light and peace. 
       
        Blessed Be...De

    • Christopher Blackwell
      De, As it was I had to go to the patient advocate as they were going to send me home to do the laying on my belly for ten days. This surgery is claimed to be
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 22, 2009
        De,

        As it was I had to go to the patient advocate as they were
        going to send me home to do the laying on my belly for
        ten days. This surgery is claimed to be out patient procedure.
        Nor was the idea of a four hour bus trip while trying to keep
        my head facing the floor making much sense to me. So that
        was how I got the hospital stay and probably the only way I
        could have worked with the situation. Meanwhile all the people
        that worked with me at the hospital went a bit beyond in
        getting me checked out to catch my 11 AM bus home.

        I also fell in the hospital. But then falling is becoming more
        common. I don't have much a sense of balance any more. But this
        has been developing for nearly a decade. So sometime there will
        be a walker in my future. However until I am forced into it, I must
        pay full attention when I walk, where both feet are, how I am
        moving them and how the floor or ground is changing in front of
        me. Walking while thinking of something else is just a bit too risky.

        It is called getting older and learning to adjust is constant. I was
        working on our sales tax this morning looking through and around
        that gas bubble in my eye. But I did the same when the floaters
        showed up in my eye. Slows me down a bit but it does not yet stop
        me from reading and writing and using the internet. Any of our older
        people deal with it in some form. Giving up is not an option nor should
        it be. Meanwhile you keep your attention to what you still can do and
        do it.

        Having reached Geezer, I am now working on the old part of it. Meanwhile
        the gas bubble seems to have started decreasing and I am expecting a
        fairly good report from my eye doctor. None of this stops me yet in talking
        with tourists or explaining stuff to them, and I put in eight hours yet. I just
        rest a bit more than I used to.

        I think talking about it may serve good purpose as I am far from the only
        person dealing with this type of thing. People just starting to deal with it
        may get scared or depressed and that fear or depression will do more
        harm then any limits. So we have to show that yes life goes on and we
        still can have a fair amount of fun even with the limits that come.

        Also I have a very good example of that in my partner who only has 14%
        of his lungs left, but still puts in six to eight hours on his computer, wrote
        one 1400 page book on Lithophysae, researched and planned our solar panel
        system, moved his rock collection with help to the local museum but put it
        back by himself, and lately designed on his computer the new storage
        building we had built last year. He still drives to the mine to supervise the
        mining and hauls back all the rock in his pick up, a hundred mile round
        trip, while on oxygen. He is working on his autobiography, so far it is over
        a 1006 pages and still growing, typed one finger at a time. So the time
        since losing most of his lungs has been his most creative period of his life.

        Many other people here could tell similar stories. Life is still there to be lived.
        The question remains the same all of your life. "What are you going to do with
        the rest of your life?"

        Blessed Be,

        Christopher


        --- In Pagan-Headstone-Campaign@yahoogroups.com, De <desawitch@...> wrote:
        >
        > WOW!  Chris you would have told you everything they didn't tell you I have to won
        didn't tell you all of it because they've had people not show up whengiven it more than a
        thought or two if it were me!  I hope your eye heals well and no other surgeries are
        needed.  Please keep us posted on how things are going with your eye and if you have to
        have surgery on the other one.
        >
        >   You are 100% correct when you said that "Geezers are stuborn old coots for a reason"
        they have to be because if they were no one would pay attention to them or do anything
        for them.  They have to have a voice all their own so they can sit up and be
        counted...there are many Vets that have fallen through the cracks and if they wouldn't
        have been as stubborn as they are they would have been forgotten about long ago...that
        is something that we as a nation should be ashamed about! 
        >
        >   Take it wasy and glad to hear that you are home...like I said keep us posted on how
        you are doing and how your eyes are doing.
        >
        >   I send you all love, light and peace. 
        >
        >   Blessed Be...De
        >
      • Connie
        Hello Christopher, Friday, January 23, 2009, 2:14:15 AM, you wrote: CB I think talking about it may serve good purpose as I am far from the only CB person
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 23, 2009
          Re: [Pagan-Headstone-Campaign] Re: Chris's surgery...

          Hello Christopher,


          Friday, January 23, 2009, 2:14:15 AM, you wrote:


          CB> I think talking about it may serve good purpose as I am far from the only

          CB> person dealing with this type of thing. People just starting to deal with it

          CB> may get scared or depressed and that fear or depression will do more 

          CB> harm then any limits. So we have to show that yes life goes on and we 

          CB> still can have a fair amount of fun even with the limits that come.


          It's not just age. I think we all have this superman/woman in our hearts... who thinks, no, who KNOWS, that we can do anything we put our minds too. There is also a primitive caveman/woman side that throws in the instincts... I want, I need, I'm scared... and then there's that more practical individual who lives in our head that reminds of the laws of physics, and reality in general... 


          and did I mention the gremlins who reside within our bones and joints who just do their own darn thing? 


          Quite a crowd, and we do not always communicate well. The heart says I can walk and be as strong as I feel. The instinct says, yea, and I don't want any predators to see me looking weak. The brain says "But, remember the bad knees?" The others blow off the brain and the knee gremlin says "Sprioing goes the knee!" Feelings (and knee) get hurt. One lesson is generally not enough either, and logic has NO part in the equation. Logic is a tool the brain uses and usually, the heart and instinct reply with a snide-sounding snif and turn their backs. The brain managed to convince the rest that somedays it is better to carry a cane or walking stick, even if we do not use it, because it's there if we need it. It's presence makes us pay attention a bit better. I think in general, it's good to have strong-willed personalities on your team, even when they have their conflicts ;-) 


          Eyes are painful (I had lasik and a rock injury) and hurt worse than other surgeries I've had. But the recovery/pain period is usually blessedly short! Hope you are recovering well from your surgery :-)  


          --

          :-) Connie

          http://whaleears.blogspot.com/

          mailto:qitty@...

        • Christopher Blackwell
          Connie, No eye pain anyway, just ten days on my belly to keep the gas bubble against where I wanted the retina to attach itself. Meanwhile with today being
          Message 4 of 7 , Jan 28, 2009
            Connie,

            No eye pain anyway, just ten days on my belly to
            keep the gas bubble against where I wanted the
            retina to attach itself.

            Meanwhile with today being shopping day in town,
            I made my first use of the walker. Even fairly agile
            as I am walkers do slow one down. Meanwhile
            learning how to fold and toss in the back of the pickup
            and then reach back and life out and unfold before
            going anywhere. Amazing how many bumps and dips
            in parking lots and floors that I never had to notice before
            that could cause a problem if I did not notice them with
            the walker.

            Meanwhile getting advice from people about the finer points
            of using a walker. Last one was sticking the back legs into
            tennis balls so I can slid the back legs instead of lifting them
            and taking a chance with my balance. So that is on next weeks
            shopping list, buy tennis balls.

            Always learning something.

            Blessed Be,
            Christopher
            --- In Pagan-Headstone-Campaign@yahoogroups.com, Connie <qitty@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hello Christopher,
            >
            > Friday, January 23, 2009, 2:14:15 AM, you wrote:
            >
            > CB> I think talking about it may serve good purpose as I am far from the only
            > CB> person dealing with this type of thing. People just starting to deal with it
            > CB> may get scared or depressed and that fear or depression will do more
            > CB> harm then any limits. So we have to show that yes life goes on and we
            > CB> still can have a fair amount of fun even with the limits that come.
            >
            > It's not just age. I think we all have this superman/woman in our hearts... who thinks,
            no, who KNOWS, that we can do anything we put our minds too. There is also a primitive
            caveman/woman side that throws in the instincts... I want, I need, I'm scared... and then
            there's that more practical individual who lives in our head that reminds of the laws of
            physics, and reality in general...
            >
            > and did I mention the gremlins who reside within our bones and joints who just do
            their own darn thing?
            >
            > Quite a crowd, and we do not always communicate well. The heart says I can walk and
            be as strong as I feel. The instinct says, yea, and I don't want any predators to see me
            looking weak. The brain says "But, remember the bad knees?" The others blow off the
            brain and the knee gremlin says "Sprioing goes the knee!" Feelings (and knee) get hurt.
            One lesson is generally not enough either, and logic has NO part in the equation. Logic is
            a tool the brain uses and usually, the heart and instinct reply with a snide-sounding snif
            and turn their backs. The brain managed to convince the rest that somedays it is better
            to carry a cane or walking stick, even if we do not use it, because it's there if we need it.
            It's presence makes us pay attention a bit better. I think in general, it's good to have
            strong-willed personalities on your team, even when they have their conflicts ;-)
            >
            > Eyes are painful (I had lasik and a rock injury) and hurt worse than other surgeries I've
            had. But the recovery/pain period is usually blessedly short! Hope you are recovering well
            from your surgery :-)
            >
            > --
            > :-) Connie
            > http://whaleears.blogspot.com/
            > mailto:qitty@...
            >
          • Connie
            Hello Christopher, Glad there s no pain! Hope you are all recovered by now too. My mom had a walker after her stroke and I was a amazed at how sticky the
            Message 5 of 7 , Jan 28, 2009
              Re: [Pagan-Headstone-Campaign] Re: Chris's surgery...

              Hello Christopher,


              Glad there's no pain! Hope you are all recovered by now too. 


              My mom had a walker after her stroke and I was a amazed at how 'sticky' the feet were... really made the thing stable... stable enough to use as a gymnastics horse or something, it was really surprising to me since it seemed like such a light, flimsy, aluminum-foldy thing! But, mom really needed that extreme stability... she did not get tennis balls. I had to be careful when handling it though... catch on the floor and wheee-hahhhh! right over the handle bars! (ok, it never actually took me out, but not for lack of trying...)  


              :-) Connie


              Thursday, January 29, 2009, 5:29:15 AM, you wrote:



              CB> Connie,


              CB> No eye pain anyway, just ten days on my belly to 

              CB> keep the gas bubble against where I wanted the 

              CB> retina to attach itself. 


              CB> Meanwhile with today being shopping day in town,

              CB> I made my first use of the walker. Even fairly agile 

              CB> as I am walkers do slow one down. Meanwhile 

              CB> learning how to fold and toss in the back of the pickup 

              CB> and then reach back and life out and unfold before 

              CB> going anywhere. Amazing how many bumps and dips 

              CB> in parking lots and floors that I never had to notice before 

              CB> that could cause a problem if I did not notice them with 

              CB> the walker.


              CB> Meanwhile getting advice from people about the finer points 

              CB> of using a walker. Last one was sticking the back legs into 

              CB> tennis balls so I can slid the back legs instead of lifting them 

              CB> and taking a chance with my balance. So that is on next weeks 

              CB> shopping list, buy tennis balls.


              CB> Always learning something.


              CB> Blessed Be,

              CB> Christopher


            • Christopher Blackwell
              Connie, I will head back to Tucson early next week to have the doctors measure the change. Amazing all the little dips in parking lots and bumps on floors that
              Message 6 of 7 , Jan 29, 2009
                Connie,

                I will head back to Tucson early next week to have
                the doctors measure the change.

                Amazing all the little dips in parking lots and bumps
                on floors that I never noticed before. I talked to one
                person who has a walker at the town musuem and
                asked about some of the things I was feeling and
                found out they are pretty normal on anyone new to
                using a walker. And then the hip pads to protect
                from breaking hip bones if I do fall.

                Things to learn about. I was thinking of some
                accesories just to break that frail human being
                effect walkers cause. Maybe a couple of semi-
                automatics welded to the frame to give it a more
                macho look. It would not be important if they
                worked or not, just want to imporve the image
                of people in walkers. [Grin] Unfortunately that
                might scare mostly retired folk population here.
                Darn, but it would look so cool. [Grin]

                Of course back in the days when I drove an old
                VW beetle I wanted a crome plated M 60 machine
                gun that would track. It would not have to have
                worked, just the sight of that as a hood ornament
                and traffic would part like Moses and the Red Sea.

                I am finishing up the newsletter, was just waiting
                for one of the cartoons. When I got it I found out
                the cartoonist's business is going under. So this
                recession is hurting a lot of the small Pagan
                businesses. My non Pagan friends are reporting
                same with their businesses. I hate to see people's
                hard work going down the drain.

                Blessed Be,

                Christopher


                --- In Pagan-Headstone-Campaign@yahoogroups.com, Connie <qitty@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hello Christopher,
                >
                > Glad there's no pain! Hope you are all recovered by now too.
                >
                > My mom had a walker after her stroke and I was a amazed at how 'sticky' the feet
                were... really made the thing stable... stable enough to use as a gymnastics horse or
                something, it was really surprising to me since it seemed like such a light, flimsy,
                aluminum-foldy thing! But, mom really needed that extreme stability... she did not get
                tennis balls. I had to be careful when handling it though... catch on the floor and wheee-
                hahhhh! right over the handle bars! (ok, it never actually took me out, but not for lack of
                trying...)
                >
                > :-) Connie
              • Connie
                Hello Christopher, Friday, January 30, 2009, 5:23:25 AM, you wrote: CB I will head back to Tucson early next week to have CB the doctors measure the change.
                Message 7 of 7 , Jan 30, 2009
                  Re: [Pagan-Headstone-Campaign] Re: Chris's surgery...

                  Hello Christopher,


                  Friday, January 30, 2009, 5:23:25 AM, you wrote:


                  CB> I will head back to Tucson early next week to have 

                  CB> the doctors measure the change. 


                  Fingers crossed and many prayers that all is good :-) It is amazing what can be done with modern eye surgery... I am amazed, and grateful, every day I wake up and do not have to put on glasses anymore. I had Lasik about 2 years ago, after wearing thick(!) glasses since 6yo. I have a little halo affect at night when driving. Esp. when my eyes are dry, and may need to get glasses just for that... but what an incredible miracle! Pretty cool to go through the surgery too. Lay down on the table... couldn't see the ceiling... zap zap... look up, and I can see the texture in the ceiling tiles... until my eyes started watering and the need to heal kicked in... science is a beautiful thing.  


                  And then the hip pads to protect 

                  CB> from breaking hip bones if I do fall.


                  Never heard of that... what a good idea. As clumsy as I am, I think I'll need hip pads the size of inner tubes to stay safe as I get older ;-) 


                  CB> Things to learn about. I was thinking of some 

                  CB> accesories just to break that frail human being 

                  CB> effect walkers cause. 


                  After hauling around my mom's walker, I do not look at anyone who can use a walker as frail. Frail is a wheelchair with someone pushing it because the rider cannot. Ok, I know, some folks are... my mom was, but I had my eyes opened. A walker is great for balance... the strength can be there, but balance is very important. Get off balance and that's all she wrote. I have stong legs, I walk, I hike, I lift and play with heavy children (my 8yo is as tall as my shoulder now, but I can still heave him over my shoulder and run off with him) but sometimes  I overdo the knees. I've been told I need reconstructive surgery, but it would be major surgery, taking bones from the lower leg to rebuild the knee. I'm too busy. So, I pay attention. If my knees are feeling weak, I'll carry a cane or walking stick. I always use handrails. If I can keep the balance, I'm ok. I cannot regain it once it is tipped though... once I pass a certain point with my knees, it's hello ground. 


                  Anyway, my impression of a walker is about balance, not frailty!  


                  CB> Maybe a couple of semi-

                  CB> automatics welded to the frame to give it a more 

                  CB> macho look. It would not be important if they 

                  CB> worked or not, just want to imporve the image 

                  CB> of people in walkers. [Grin] Unfortunately that 

                  CB> might scare mostly retired folk population here.

                  CB> Darn, but it would look so cool. [Grin]


                  :-D Maybe just a few NRA stickers? Weld on a few interesting bits of wiring and randomly flashing red diodes for a terminator look?


                  CB> Of course back in the days when I drove an old 

                  CB> VW beetle I wanted a crome plated M 60 machine 

                  CB> gun that would track. It would not have to have 

                  CB> worked, just the sight of that as a hood ornament 

                  CB> and traffic would part like Moses and the Red Sea. 


                  I used to have an Isuzu Amigo... it was an awesome little truck. I always said I needed an Amigo-mounted grenade launcher. But, after having served at Ft Campbell and watching the Apache choppers with the tracking weapon systems.. oh yea... I can see what you mean. 


                  Here in Cairo though, I've been dreaming of an Explorer-mounted robotic arm with a claw... something to just pick crap up and deposit it to the side of the road... antique broken down taxis, suicidal pedestrians, donkeys, etc... 


                  CB> I am finishing up the newsletter, was just waiting 

                  CB> for one of the cartoons. When I got it I found out 

                  CB> the cartoonist's business is going under. So this 

                  CB> recession is hurting a lot of the small Pagan 

                  CB> businesses. My non Pagan friends are reporting 

                  CB> same with their businesses. I hate to see people's 

                  CB> hard work going down the drain.


                  The recession is hurting a lot of people. Some people deserved it with the foolish way they were spending beyond their means... I mean, I don't like to see anyone getting hurt, but there was a lot of people being very irresponsible. If you can't afford it, or don't even NEED it, don't BUY (risk) it. And it seemed the whole economy seemed to have that 'whatever.. i want it, I'll take two, put it on my tab' attitude, and then when things got bad, as obviously had to happen, everyone feels the pain. Even those who saved and spent carefully. 


                  --

                  :-) Connie

                  http://whaleears.blogspot.com/

                  mailto:qitty@...

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