Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Blessed Lughnasadh to all

Expand Messages
  • RunicDruid@aol.com
    _Lughnasadh Lore (August 1st)_ (http://ziglernews.blogspot.com/2007/08/lughnasadh-lore-august-1st.html) Also known as Lammas. Lughnasadh (LOO-ne-sah ) means
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 31 10:24 PM
    • 0 Attachment

       

       

      Lughnasadh Lore (August 1st)

      Also known as Lammas.

       

      Lughnasadh (LOO-ne-sah ) means the funeral games of Lugh (pronounced Loo), referring to Lugh, the Irish sun god. However, the funeral is not his own, but the funeral games he hosts in honor of his foster-mother Tailte. For that reason, the traditional Tailtean craft fairs and Tailtean marriages (which last for a year and a day) are celebrated at this time.

       

      This day originally coincided with the first reapings of the harvest. It was known as the time when the plants of spring wither and drop their fruits or seeds for our use as well as to ensure future crops.

       

      As autumn begins, the Sun God enters his old age, but is not yet dead. The God symbolically loses some of his strength as the Sun rises farther in the South each day and the nights grow longer.

       

      The Christian religion adopted this theme and called it 'Lammas', meaning 'loaf-mass ', a time when newly baked loaves of bread are placed on the altar. An alternative date around August 5 (Old Lammas), when the sun reaches 15 degrees Leo, is sometimes employed by Covens.

       

      Traditional Foods:

      Apples, Grains, Breads and Berries.

       

      Herbs and Flowers:

      All Grains, Grapes, Heather, Blackberries, Sloe, Crab Apples, Pears.

       

      Incense:

      Aloes, Rose, Sandalwood.

       

      Sacred Gemstone:

      Carnelian.

       

      Special Activities:

      As summer passes, many Pagans celebrate this time to remember its warmth and bounty in a celebrated feast shared with family or Coven members. Save and plant the seeds from the fruits consumed during the feast or ritual. If they sprout, grow the plant or tree with love and as a symbol of your connection with the Lord and Lady. Walk through the fields and orchards or spend time along springs, creeks, rivers, ponds and lakes reflecting on the bounty and love of the Lord and Lady.

       

      Other Ideas For Celebration:

      Sacrifice bad habits and unwanted things from your life by throwing symbols of them into the sabbat fire.

      Bake a loaf of bread in the shape of a man and sacrifice him in your ritual.

      Make him a part of your feast but save a piece to offer the gods.

      Take time to actually harvest fruits from your garden with your family. If you don’t have a garden, visit one of the pick-your-own farms in your area.

      Include bilberries or blueberries in your feast; these were a traditional fruit, whose abundance was seen as an indicator of the harvest to come.

      Gather the tools of your trade and bless them in order to bring a richer harvest next year.

      Share your harvest with others who are less fortunate.

      Decorate with sickles, scythes, fresh vegetables & fruits, grains, berries, corn dollies, bread. Colors are orange, gold, yellow, red and bronze.

       

       

      In many cultures, there are different legends and lore surrounding Lammas (Lughnasadh). Here are a few of the stories about this magical harvest celebration from around the world.

       

      In Israel, the festival of Shavout commemorates the beginning of the harvest, as well as honoring the date that Moses received the Torah on Mt. Sinai. The final sheaf of wheat is brought to the rabbi for a blessing, synagogues and homes are decorated with flower, and a great feast is prepared for all to enjoy.

       

      The festival of Onam is celebrated in India, and people dress up in their finest clothes and give food to the poor. Onam is celebrated in honor of King Mahabali, who was a ruler of Kerala. In one story, the god Vishnu approached Mahabali dressed as a beggar, and asked for land, which Mahabali gave him. Mahabli ended up buried under the earth by Vishnu, but was allowed to return once a year, symbolizing the planting of the seed and the subsequent harvest.

       

      Thor's wife, Sif, had beautiful golden hair, until Loki the prankster cut it off. Thor was so upset he wanted to kill Loki, but some dwarves spun new hair for Sif, which grew magically as soon as it touched her head. The hair of Sif is associated with the harvest, and the golden grain that grows every year.

       

      In the Shetland Islands, farmers believed that grain harvesting should only take place during a waning moon. They also believed this about the fall potato crop, and the cutting of peat.

       

      At Lughnasadh, calves are weaned, and the first fruits are ripe, such as apples and grapes. In some Irish counties, it was believed farmers had to wait until Lughnasadh to start picking these fruits, or bad luck would befall the community.

       

      In some countries, Lammas is a time for warrior games and mock battles. This may hearken back to the days when a harvest festival was held, and people would come for miles around to get together. What better way for young men to show off their strength and impress the girls than by whacking away at all the competition? Competitions are also held in honor of Lugh, the mighty Celtic craftsman god, in which artisans offer up their finest work.

       

      It's become a custom to give people the gift of a pair of gloves at Lammastide. In part, it's because winter is just around the corner, but it's also related to an old tradition in which landowners gave their tenants a pair of gloves after the harvest. The glove is a symbol of authority and benevolence.

       

       
      Blessings, Robert (AKA Rune)



      (\__/)
      (O.0)
      (> <) This is Bunny. Copy Bunny into your signature to help him on his way to world domination.




      Get fantasy football with free live scoring. Sign up for FanHouse Fantasy Football today.
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.