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Egyptian Mollaas trying to divorce USA

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  • S Turkman
    It may sound like a Prediction but anybody can tell, Egypt can not find a replacement of USA and IMF in Communist China or any other countries now under rule
    Message 1 of 10 , Aug 29, 2012
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      It may sound like a Prediction but anybody can tell,  Egypt can not find a replacement of USA and IMF in Communist China or any other countries now under rule of its crazy Mollaas. Egypt was 2nd largest US Charity of Aid Receiver behind Israel, before US Attack on Pakistan Army disguised as Taliban and Taliban in Afghanistan. Egypt is a country that still is living off US and West's Charity of Aid and Loans.
      I guess, Egyptian President is ignorant. He does not know, China had refused Pakistan, its old, so boasting about its fast friendship with China's similar requests, despite already being closer to China more than USA for more than 40 years. After rejecting Pakistan's request for Defense Pact against USA or at least against India, China had clearly said last year, ...
      "China would not be replacing US Aid or IMF Loans for Pakistan"
      .--------------
      Future of Egypt:
      .
      Unrelated to this News is ...
      1. News of Russia exploring all year around ways to open North Sea shortcut to China for Europeans. This would be an option instead of keep paying Egypt fees for use of Suez Canal. After Russia's lifting of Restrictions on Merchant Ship passage through North Sea, North European Ships using this shortcut in Summer are saving 2/3rd of Fuel and time going to China. With modern Ice Cutting Ships in front, Russia wants to run Convoys of Merchant Ships through North Sea even throughout Winter. This would reduce Egypt's Income from Britain-France built and formerly owned by them 'Suez Canal'.
      2. Egypt also wants to stop selling the small amount of Petrol & Gas that she has been selling in past to Israel through a Pipe Line, ending her that advantage.
      3. Egyptian Mollaas want to demolish Sphinx and Pyramids because they are un-Islamic. This would end Egypt's Tourism Based Economy.
      .
      All these developments would make Egypt (Per Capita Income $ 3,000) as poor as Pakistan (Per Capita $ 1,000) in future- World Average Per Capita Income $ 10,000.
      When comes JehaaDi Mollaa in power, there come miseries of Poverty, Illiteracy, backwardness, death & destruction ...!
      Allaho Akbar ...! 
      .
      S U Turkman

      From: muradali shaikh <muradali_shaikh2@...>

      Assalam alaikum brother Bashir. I am glad that you are a qualified technical man knowing about wind energy, etc. which is essential for underdeveloped and unemployed millions in Bangladesh and Pakistan. If you can establish work in your field in Somalia, Turkey or Egypt it will generate job opportunities for many and may also bring about a better political and economic system in Pakistan away from the present mafia ruling system.

      Please read the following report of change, hope and opportunities for the millions of our unemployed brothers:

      New Egypt leader steps onto world stage seeking 'balance'1
      http://medya.todayszaman.com/todayszaman/2012/08/28/morsi.jpg
      Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi talks during an interview with Reuters at the presidential palace in Cairo, August 27, 2012. (Photo: Reuters)
      28 August 2012 / REUTERS, CAIRO
      Egypt's new Islamist president said on Monday he would pursue a "balanced" foreign policy, reassuring Israel its peace treaty was safe, hinting at a new approach to Iran and calling on Bashar al-Assad's allies to help lever the Syrian leader out.  
      Mohamed Mursi, who was elected in June and consolidated his power this month by dismissing top military leaders, is seeking to introduce himself to a wider world ahead of a trip to Iran - the first by an Egyptian leader in three decades - and China.
      "Egypt is now a civilian state ... a national, democratic, constitutional, modern state," he told Reuters in his first interview with an international news organisation since taking office as the candidate of the once-banned Muslim Brotherhood.
      "International relations between all states are open and the basis for all relations is balance. We are not against anyone but we are for achieving our interests," said the U.S.-educated engineer, appearing confident and assertive in the marble-lined presidential palace.
      The first leader Egyptians have elected in a 5,000-year history dating back to the pharaohs, he spoke in a room for visiting dignitaries surrounded by monarchy-era furniture, oil paintings and a grand tapestry on the wall.
      Mursi, 61, came to power after the fall of Hosni Mubarak, who served for decades as a loyal U.S. ally and the guarantor of Egypt's status as the first Arab country to make peace with Israel.
      His emphasis on balance suggests he is seeking a less explicitly pro-American role in the region, but he has also been at pains to reassure traditional allies.
      Mursi's Brotherhood describes Israel as a racist and expansionist state, but he resigned from it on taking power and has avoided inflammatory language. He repeated his position that Egypt will continue to abide by international treaties, including its 1979 peace deal.
      Without mentioning Israel by name, he indicated Egypt's neighbour had nothing to fear from a new military campaign in the Sinai Peninsula, which he ordered after gunmen attacked an Egyptian border post, killed 16 guards and tried to burst across the frontier into Israel.
      "Egypt is practicing its very normal role on its soil and does not threaten anyone and there should not be any kind of international or regional concerns at all from the presence of Egyptian security forces," he said, referring to the extra police, army and other forces moved to the area.
      The military campaign was in "full respect to international treaties", he said. The Egypt-Israel peace deal includes limits on Egyptian military deployment in Sinai.
      Officials in Israel, already concerned that Egypt's Islamists will support the Brotherhood-offshoot Hamas in Gaza, have voiced worries about Egypt's build-up of heavy armour in Sinai to quash militants.
      Mursi would not say if he would meet Israeli officials. Mubarak regularly received top officials although only went to Israel once for a funeral.
      In an effort to increase Egypt's role in regional affairs, Mursi has called for dialogue between Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Turkey and Iran to find a way to stop the bloodshed in Syria. Notably, the initiative has been welcomed by Iran, the only country in the group that supports Assad.
      During his interview, Mursi gave a particularly strong call for Assad to be removed from power, suggesting that he is comfortable taking a high profile role in regional affairs. It is a message he will take on his trip to Iran and China, which, along with Russia, are the main countries backing Assad.
      "Now is the time to stop this bloodshed and for the Syrian people to regain their full rights and for this regime that kills its people to disappear from the scene," Mursi said.
      "There is no room to talk about reform, but the discussion is about change," Mursi said, adding Egypt had repeated that "the friends of the Syrian people in China and Russia and other states" need to back ordinary Syrians. However, Mursi said he opposed foreign military action in Syria "in any form".
      First visit to Iran
      In what could be an important sign of a shift in the region, Mursi's visit to Iran this week will be the first by an Egyptian leader since Iran's 1979 Islamic revolution. The two countries broke off diplomatic relations at the time over Egypt's support for the ousted Iranian Shah and its peace with Israel, and have yet to formally restore ties.
      Officially, Mursi's visit is to attend a summit of the 120-nation Non-Aligned Movement, and he would not be drawn on whether Egypt would resume full diplomatic ties with Iran.
      Asked whether he saw a threat from Iran, whose nuclear programme has sparked fears in the West and Israeli warnings that it could consider a military action, Mursi said: "We see that all the countries in the region need stability and peaceful co-existence with each other. This cannot be achieved with wars but through political work and special relations between the countries of the region."
      After Iran, Mursi will travel in September to the United States, which still gives the Egyptian military $1.3 billion in aid a year.
      Asked how the outcome of the U.S. election in November might change ties, Mursi said Egypt works with the United States as "a stable institution" rather than dealing with personalities.
      Transformation
      Stocky and well-dressed, Mursi spoke in good humour in the palace where Mubarak held court for decades.
      Criticised at the start of his election campaign as a stiff politician who seemed more of a Brotherhood functionary than statesman-in-waiting, he has warmed to the role. His dramatic move against the army on Aug. 12 stamped his authority on the nation far more quickly than many had expected.
      Mursi's rise to the presidency is not only a transformation for Egypt but also for him personally, climbing from a poor Nile Delta village to study in California before joining the Brotherhood. Like many members of the group, he was jailed for periods under Mubarak. They have swapped places and the 83-year-old former president is now serving life in jail.
      Mursi sealed his rise to power this month with his audacious move to pension off military leaders who had ruled the country during the long transition after Mubarak was toppled last year. In his interview, he took care to praise the army in its transitional role and describe it as part of Egypt's "national fabric."
      Liberals worry that the rise of Mursi and his Brotherhood group could lead to the imposition of Islamic sharia law, which they fear will impose social restrictions in a country where a tenth of the 82 million people are Christians and tourist visits to its beaches and pharaonic ruins are a vital source of income.
      Mursi said tourism would grow under his rule.
      When asked whether the new constitution, now being drawn up by an assembly before being put to the nation on a referendum, would seek to implement the Islamic code, he said it was up to the Egyptian people to decide.
    • S Turkman
      Karachi traders to submit extortion slips along with income tax Karachi, Aug. 29 (ANI) Karachi s business community, which is reportedly compelled to pay Rs
      Message 2 of 10 , Aug 29, 2012
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        Karachi traders to submit 'extortion slips' along with income tax

        Karachi, Aug. 29 (ANI) Bookmark and Share

        Karachi's business community, which is reportedly compelled to pay Rs 15 million to Extortionists every day, has said that this form of "double taxation" has to end.
        The chairman of the All Karachi Tajir Ittehad, Atiq Mir, said the Traders would start submitting "Extortion Slips" along with their official Tax Returns to the Federal Board of Revenue and then use them to claim a deduction on their Income Taxes, reports The Express Tribune.


        "If the situation is not brought under control by September 2013, then we will start deducting the Extortion we pay from our Income Taxes. We will adjust our Tax Returns accordingly if the Government does not allow us address the issue," said Mir.

        Mir said Ramazan was especially hard on the business community this year, as it paid two rupees in extortion for every rupee it owed the government in taxes in the month.

        Mir added that over 30,000 traders had been forced to move their businesses outside the city due to the menace of Extortion, and that the number could reach 50,000 by the end of the year if the government fails to address the problem.

        Cell phones play a significant role in facilitating Extortionists and other Criminals, in which Criminals coerce people to use e-banking and cell phone credit transfer facilities to pay them.

        "Law Enforcement agencies should spend some time and scrutinise records, and then block those SIM cards that are being used for nefarious purposes like Kidnapping for Ransom or extorting money," said Mir. (ANI)

        .-------------
        TURKMAN:
        But the problem, why Elected Government of Islamic Republic of Pakistan can not take any action in that Military Staged Democracy is, Extortionists are either Military people in Plain Clothes or the ones, who work for them.
        Not only Police and Secret Agencies but even people on the Street know this but nobody can name them because its a Cardinal Sin to say anything bad about Pak Military.
        If they ever do, Allah suddenly makes such people disappear and even their corpses are not found. Forget about arresting gods of Pakistan, who can make blunder of even putting word, 'Pak Military' in front of word 'Extortionists'?
        Life of Moslims is more important that Islam this is why, they conveniently always lose their Vocabulary before doing this. ... Allaho Akbar ...!

        Pakistan ZinDaabaaD ... !
        Pakistan say JalDee Bhaag ...! (Translation: Let Corruption thrive, flee Pakistan ...!)






      • S Turkman
        Sat Sep 1, 2012 8:15 am (PDT) . Posted by: marco.pertoni@libero.it sitrep_comalp 08/21/2012 10:01 RUSSIA Russia launches first federal
        Message 3 of 10 , Sep 1, 2012
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          Sat Sep 1, 2012 8:15 am (PDT) . Posted by:

          "marco.pertoni@..." sitrep_comalp



          08/21/2012 10:01
          RUSSIA
          Russia launches first federal TV channel for Muslims
          by Nina Achmatova
          The channel Al-RTV is subsidized by the state and by private donations, and aims to help spread the values of moderate Islam, against extremist influences mainly from the South

          Moscow (AsiaNews) - Russia has its first public Muslim television channel. It's called Al-RTV and was launched on 19 August, as reported by information portal Bashin form. Desired by some of the major organizations that promote the religious and spiritual values ??of Islam in the Federation, AL-RTV for now covers eight Russian regions: Bashkortostan, Tatarstan and the six republics of the North Caucasus. Programs were launched on the day of Eid-ul-Fitr, the holiday that celebrates the end of the holy month of Ramadan.

          The Director is Rustam Arifd-zhanov, vice president of the Eurasian Academy of Television and Radio Broadcasting. The TV is controlled by a public council, consisting of representatives of the major Islamic organizations in the country, and is supported financially by private donations and government grants. The idea is to extend the service to other countries of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS).

          The problem of disseminating the values ?? of moderate Islam to fight the spread of Wahhabism, especially coming from the Caucasus, is top of the agenda not only of the religious leaders, but also of the Kremlin. Recently, the Russian autonomous republic of Tataristan, a Muslim majority - but noted for the peaceful coexistence between Islam and Christianity - has been targeted by a series of attacks, which, according to investigators, are linked to an attempt to root extremism in the social tissue, hitherto alien to these areas.

          http://www.asianews .it/news- en/Russia- launches- first-federal- TV-channel- for-Muslims- 25595.html
          --------------
          TURKMAN: An intelligent civilized way to fight distortions in Islam, Islamic Extremism and Terrorism. All opposing views are welcomed by the Moslim Program Moderators with Knowledge of Islam.







        • S Turkman
          Italy expels former imam jailed for terror training. El Korchi preached for Holy War, JehaaD against Italy and the West. Sat Sep 1, 2012 8:10 am (PDT)
          Message 4 of 10 , Sep 1, 2012
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            Italy expels former imam jailed for terror training. El Korchi preached for Holy War, JehaaD against Italy and the West. 

            Sat Sep 1, 2012 8:10 am (PDT) . Posted by:

            "marco.pertoni@..." sitrep_comalp


            I
            taly expels former Imam jailed for terror training
            El Korchi preached Jihadist sermons, police say
            30 July, 17:17

            Guarda la foto1 di 1


            (ANSA) - Perugia, July 30 - Italy has expelled the former imam of a mosque in suburban Perugia, following his release from prison, where he served a six-year sentence for Terrorist Training.


            Moroccan Mostapha El Korchi, former Imam of the mosque at Ponte Felcino, was released and repatriated from Rome's main Leonardo da Vinci airport.


            He was regarded as a central character in an investigation that led counter-terrorism authorities in Italy to arrest him and his two Moroccan assistants, and seize a wide range of Explosive materials.


            El Korchi had been under surveillance for months with police tracking his Internet activity and recording Public Sermons in favour of Jihad or Holy War, Police said at the time of his arrest.


            El Korchi, who was active in training would-be terrorists, served his sentence in a prison in southern Italy and was then immediately expelled as ordered by the courts in his sentence.

            http://www.ansa. it/web/notizie/ rubriche/ english/2012/ 07/30/Italy- expels-former- imam-jailed- terror-training_ 7261251.h








          • S Turkman
            Italy: Police injured during Jail Revolt of Illegal Moslim Migrants Sat Sep 1, 2012 8:12 am (PDT) . Posted by: marco.pertoni@libero.it
            Message 5 of 10 , Sep 1, 2012
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              Italy: Police injured during Jail Revolt of Illegal Moslim Migrants

              Sat Sep 1, 2012 8:12 am (PDT) . Posted by:

              "marco.pertoni@..." sitrep_comalp


              Italy: Police injured during migrant revolt
              last update: August 21, 11:25

              Ragusa, 21 Aug. (AKI) -
              Two police were hospitalised with minor injuries in southern Italy following a revolt by more than a dozen Tunisian migrants, who feared they would be sent home.

              The 14 migrants were arrested in the Italian southern region of Sicily after destroying the Detention Centre in the city of Ragusa where they were held.

              The men, who had only arrived by boat to the Sicilian island of Lampedusa a couple of weeks before, were arrested by the police and accused of resistance and violence towards authorities in Ragusa, a city in southwestern Sicilian, where the migrant centre was located.

              In an attempt to escape, the men "destroyed the housing where they were kept and the Video-surveillance System. They flooded some rooms with fire sprinklers, destroyed computers, other objects belonging to the police and the civil protection agency" according to the Police.

              The men used the Glass from the broken windows as weapons and climbed on the roof to throw fire extinguishers, chairs, shoes, light bulbs and anything else they could find at police that was trying to stop them. Two policemen were taken to hospital, one was hit in the face by a sharp object and the other by a glass bottle that fractured his cheek bone.

              The violence comes after their recent failed escape attempt prior, when they were immediately stopped and returned to the centre.

              http://www.adnkrono s.com/IGN/ Aki/English/ Security/ Italy-Police- injured-during- migrant-revolt_ 313617685728. html







            • S Turkman
              Islam: Cergy Muslims finally have their mosque Sat Sep 1, 2012 8:14 am (PDT) . Posted by: marco.pertoni@libero.it sitrep_comalp Islam:
              Message 6 of 10 , Sep 1, 2012
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                Islam: Cergy Muslims finally have their mosque

                Sat Sep 1, 2012 8:14 am (PDT) . Posted by:

                "marco.pertoni@..." sitrep_comalp



                Islam: Cergy Muslims finally have their mosque
                Inaugurated today in Paris suburbs, 1.500 capacity
                06 July, 20:50

                (ANSAMed) - PARIS, JULY 6 - The new, modern-style, green-domed mosque in the suburban town of Cergy opened today.

                At 2,000 square metres, it has capacity for 1,500 people and cost 3.75 million euros to build.

                The town pitched in by guaranteeing half of a 2.2 million loan taken out by the Cergy Muslim Federation, and by leasing the land at a nominal price for 99 years. The rest came from donations from Federation members.

                ''It is our responsibility to progressively build a French Islam, one that will find put down roots in our country,'' said Interior Minister Manuel Valls, who attended the opening of the mosque. ''This was made possible by two things: Muslim unity, and political will,'' Socialist Mayor Dominique Lefebvre said.

                ''We want it to be clear that we paid for this, through donations,'' Imam Tahar Mahdi said.

                There have been projects to build a mosque in Cergy since the 1980s. Lefebvre, who was elected in 1996, has played a fine balancing act with French law, which bans public funding of religious sites. The new mosque also has a cultural center, a tea room, a funeral parlor, and schoolrooms.

                http://www.ansamed. info/ansamed/ en/news/sections /generalnews/ 2012/07/06/ Islam-Cergy- Muslims-finally- have-mosque_ 7154295.html
                ---------------
                TURKMAN:
                1. Has anybody noticed, Imam claiming "We paid for this through Donations" denying the fact that Non Moslim French of that town pitched in by guaranteeing half of a 2.2 million Euro loan take out by Moslim Immigrants?
                2. Is this the same Imam, who used to preach paying Interest on Loans is Illegal or 'Hraam' in Islam, while his organization pays Interest on its Loan every month?
                3. They paid through Donations to build a very expensive Mosque but at the same time millions of Moslims starved in poor countries of world because doing Good Deeds has become a lot less important than building a Mosque in Islam now.







              • S Turkman
                Sat, September 1, 2012 12:15:38 PM More Mosques needed, not Islam, Education or Literacy From: S Turkman To: Syed Ali
                Message 7 of 10 , Sep 1, 2012
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                  Sat, September 1, 2012 12:15:38 PM
                  More Mosques needed, not Islam, Education or Literacy
                  From:
                  S Turkman <turkman@...>
                  To:Syed Ali <sabahatca@...>; ghulam_yusuf@...; nafmor08@...; Zina Khan <zina.khan@...>
                  Cc:Feroz <fda1939@...>; HAMID HASAN <hamid.hasan@...>; Arif Khan <arif12@...>; Iftekhar Hai <umah.hai@...>; Trishool <lalhgehi@...>; "shahid@..." <shahid@...>; bahramji@...

                  France: 200 new mosques being built, but they are not enough

                  Sat Sep 1, 2012 8:15 am (PDT) . Posted by:

                  "marco.pertoni@..." sitrep_comalp



                  France: 200 new mosques being built, but they are not enough
                  Will be added to 2,200 existing mosques
                  25 July, 17:52

                  Gathering in front of Saint Priest mosque in Lyon
                  (ANSAMed) - PARIS, JULY 25 -
                  France has 2,200 active mosques totaling 300,000 square meters, but given that each worshiper needs at least one square meter of space, that number should double in order to adequately serve all the faithful, according to the French Council of the Muslim Faith, which represents the French Muslims before the national government.

                  About 200 new mosques are currently being built in France with funding from worshipers, Muslim countries, an the World Islamic League, a Saudi Arabia-based NGO that covers missing construction expenses, according to Le Monde daily's website.

                  France has been criticized in past years because of Muslims worshiping in the streets, especially in multi-ethnic neighborhoods.

                  http://www.ansamed. info/ansamed/ en/news/sections /generalnews/ 2012/07/25/ France-200- new-mosques- being-built- they-not- enough_7235198. html
                  ----------
                  TURKMAN: More Mosques needed in Non Moslim Countries, not Islam, Education or Literacy though Allah had said in Qoraan, He does not even think those are Moslims, who live amongst Non Moslims and do not emigrate to live in Moslim Land. (Read the Soraah on Treaty of 'HooDaibiyaa' in Qoraan if you doubt me ...!)







                • S Turkman
                  Tunisia democratic activists fear a tilt toward militant Islam Fundamentalist Islamists in Tunisia try to exert influence on the country as it moves unsteadily
                  Message 8 of 10 , Sep 1, 2012
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                    Tunisia democratic activists fear a tilt toward militant Islam

                    Fundamentalist Islamists in Tunisia try to exert influence on the country as it moves unsteadily toward democracy.

                    Islamists in Tunisia
                    An ultraconservative Muslim holds a Koran during a protest at Manouba University in Tunis after clashes between Salafi and leftist students. (Amine Landoulsi, Associated Press / August 31, 2012)
                    By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
                    August 30, 2012, 4:41 p.m.
                     
                    SIDI BOUZID, Tunisia — Bearded and sweaty, they pressed in, their faces shining in the shadow and light beneath billowing tunics hanging for sale outside a mosque. The sun edged higher. A veiled woman hurried past and a boy stepped closer to listen to men complain about no jobs in fields or factories, no water in thousands of homes.
                     
                    "I didn't trust the old government and I don't trust the new one. They lie. I trust in another revolution," said Khalid Ahmedi, his disgust sharpening as shopkeepers slipped past him to pray. "The constitution must be based on the Koran and our prophet. I say to the enemies of Tunisia: We are the sons of Osama bin Laden."
                    In this town where a fruit seller set himself on fire and inspired uprisings that swept the Arab world, men quote scripture to ease the ills around them. Tunisia has been regarded as a model for its relatively smooth shift from generations of autocratic rule toward democracy. But even as the downfall of President Zine el Abidine ben Ali in 2011 revived political discourse, it roused deep-seated strands of puritanical Islam that are challenging civil freedoms.
                     
                    The moderate Islamist Nahda party dominates a coalition government but is under pressure from Salafis and other fundamentalist Muslim groups to tilt the nation closer to sharia, or Islamic law. A proposed bill would protect "sacred values" and criminalize acts such as images and satire against religion. A draft constitution designates women, who make up about 25% of the constituent assembly and are among the most liberated in the Arab world, as complementary to men in family life.
                     
                    "The extremists here are like the Ku Klux Klan in America," said Bayrem Kilani, a folk singer whose satirical lyrics have upset both Islamists and Ben Ali loyalists. "We have two ways to go now: the way of modern democracy or the way of medieval theocracy."
                     
                    Art galleries have been firebombed and ransacked, film directors have been threatened, and a prominent Nahda member was assaulted by an extremist at a recent conference titled "Tolerance in Islam." The fervor echoes the passion of Salafis emerging in Egypt and other nations. But it appears more volatile in Tunisia, even though the population of ultraconservatives is significantly smaller.
                     
                    What is unfolding here is yet another test of what will shape emerging governments in North Africa and the Middle East. The unresolved struggle between fundamentalist and moderate Islamists is the center of a larger debate with liberals and secularists over religion's influence on public life. It has been agitated by newly free societies that feel both the tug of the traditional and the allure of the contemporary.
                     
                    "I think there may be a civil war," said Bochra Belhaj Hamida, a lawyer and human rights advocate. "Modern Islamists aren't in a hurry to change society, but the Salafis want to do it as quickly as possible. They're focused on Tunisia because of our advanced civil and women's rights. They want to win here to show the rest of the region."
                     
                    Much of the puritanical wellspring emanates from rural outposts that for years swelled with hate for Ben Ali while dispatching militants to conflicts in Algeria, Iraq and other countries. Fearing that ultraconservatives will question its Islamic credentials, Nahda has done little to stem extremist tendencies. Secularists suggest Nahda is using Salafis to advance an agenda more radical than the party publicly acknowledges.
                     
                    Nahda's popularity is slipping amid a high unemployment rate, discontent among youths, labor strikes and battles over religion. Tunisians are expected to vote in a referendum on the new constitution next year and, although the country is vibrant with open debate, there is a sense that the revolution has veered in the wrong direction.
                     
                    The Islamists are "not strong enough to mention sharia in the constitution," said Motah Elwaar, a leftist. "But if they win the next election, they will change the laws."
                     
                    The capital, Tunis, resonates with Islamist ethos and cosmopolitan flair as if competing personalities are vying for the future. Despite their disarray and infighting, liberals and secularists are strong in Tunis; a recent march to protect women's rights drew thousands into the main boulevard, modeled after a Paris street and bearing the vestiges of colonial rule.
                     
                    Beyond the capital's ring road and the Mediterranean coast, where highways narrow and dry valleys widen, fields and olive groves stretch through the dust on the way to Sidi Bouzid. Poverty is rampant and young men, like Mohamed Bouazizi, the fruit seller who set himself on fire in despair and touched off Tunisia's revolution in late 2010, stew in empty hours.
                     
                    Down the street from Bouazizi's memorial — a statue of a fruit cart — the graffiti of revolt had turned into a sparse poetry of despair: "It's a shame they stole our revolution." Soldiers stood guard at the courthouse, where scores of dissidents are on trial for storming a government building. Young secularists seemed unfocused and unsure of how to make things better.
                     
                    "There's no freedom of expression. No jobs," said Ali Abidi, a blogger. "The Islamists are sitting on the town. The police can't control them anymore. The Salafis don't like what I write. One of them told me, 'Your end is not going to be pretty.' But we just want our rights."
                     
                    There was certainty in the voices around the mosque.
                     
                    "We are Muslims. We trust only God," said Abdel Omri, a husky man with a full beard and skullcap shopping for sandals on the sidewalk. "We only use the government to get our ID cards. It has no bearing on our lives. We don't believe in man's democracy. God gave us democracy in the Koran. God accepts and God forbids. That is all."
                    Omri said he runs a telecommunications repair company and hires only fellow Salafis.
                     
                    "I was liberal before," he said. "I didn't know my religion. The former regime made Islam disappear. But now I know my faith. I'm very happy. I converted two Christians to Islam not long ago."
                     
                    Behind the mosque, in a row of shops, Ussayf Issaoni couldn't see beyond his rage: four children, high rent, water shortages, a hurting business, a failing government. He said the revolution that rose from these streets has forsaken him. New dangers, once held at bay, have moved closer.
                     
                    "A young bearded Salafi was sitting in front of my store," said Issaoni, who owns a phone accessory shop. "I asked him to leave. A lot of my customers are girls and they might feel intimidated by him. He came back with his friends and they beat me. I was in the hospital for two weeks."
                     
                    Ben Ali's security forces arrested thousands of Islamists accused of plotting to overthrow his government and export extremism across the Middle East and Europe. Younger militants were inspired by foreign Islamic fighters and by decades during which the government suppressed even moderate Islam and dispatched state-sanctioned preachers to mosques.
                     
                    The Salafi groups that have emerged after years of being underground include those run by older ultraconservatives who, like their counterparts in Egypt, want a place in the new government. But younger Salafis are more militant and resistant to compromise, regarding secularists and liberals as Zionists and infidels. They speak of spiritual renewal.
                     
                    "We follow the prophet. We try to change what you believe on the inside," said Mohamed Amim, sitting in a whitewashed mosque on a warm evening with his friends. "Our goal is not to change music and cinema, but to change the spirit."
                     
                    Nahda and other moderate Islamist organizations have yet to ease the militant passions of a group that, although small, presents a threat to a fledgling government beset with deep economic problems.
                    "It will be very dangerous if we try to deny the Salafis a political say," said Abdel Cherif, a ranking Nahda member. "Our goal is to make them forget about weapons and conflict. We want them to participate in political life."
                     
                    Copyright © 2012, Los Angeles Times






                  • S Turkman
                    Editor of Pak s English daily beaten up for watching TV Press Trust of India | Updated: September 02, 2012 20:28 IST By Hiranandani. Islamabad: An
                    Message 9 of 10 , Sep 2, 2012
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                      Editor of Pak's English daily beaten up for watching TV


                      Islamabad: 
                      An editor of one of Pakistan's leading English dailies was beaten up by four men outside his home in the port city of Karachi for watching TV and listening to music.

                      Though the incident occurred on August 27 and Zainul Abedin, op-ed editor of The News daily, reported the matter to police, no action has been taken by authorities so far, journalists in Karachi said.


                      The men who attacked the journalist are members of a proselytising group.


                      According to Abedin, four men kicked open the gate of his house in the in Gulshan-e-Iqbal area at 11 pm (local time) on August 27 and began to abuse him.

                      When Abedin went to the gate to talk to the men, he was surrounded and grabbed.


                      One of the men objected to Abedin watching TV and listening to
                      qawwalis.

                      When he asked them who they were and why objected to whatever a person did in the privacy of his home, one of the men reportedly said, "We do have a problem with these things but we will solve your problem today."


                      The men beat Abedin and one of them punched him on the face and broke his glasses.


                      As they kicked and slapped Abedin, the men warned they would not let him go unless he repented and said he would not watch TV or listen to music.


                      The men attempted to follow Abedin into his house, where he lives with his sister, but he closed the gate.


                      They went away but threatened him as they left.


                      The men warned Abedin not to turn on his TV or listen to songs and qawwalis.


                      The men reportedly live behind Abedin's home and were known in the neighbourhood for their "puritanical ways and their disdain" towards anyone who watches TV and listens to music, The News reported.


                      They were also known to go from house to house in the name of the Tableeghi Jamaat, a proselytising group, and urge people to give up their "sinful" ways.


                      Abedin filed a complaint at the police station in Gulshan-e-Iqbal but no action has been taken so far.


                      The News said in a report that the incident "draws attention to a disturbing phenomenon".


                      "The attitude and action of such elements should be unacceptable not only for the direct victims of their threats and intimidation but also to those worried about the rise of extremism in our midst. The lack of police action so far can only embolden such zealots," it added.


                      Ironically, several senior reporters and columnists of The News have often been accused of being sympathetic towards right wing elements and hardline religious groups.

                      .-----------------
                      TURKMAN: This must be just a warning from ISI before he disappears, not to be ever found.
                      Pakistan ZinDaabaaD ...!
                      Pakistan say JalDi BHaag ...!








                    • S Turkman
                      But where does it say in US Constitution that ... . * ... we have to support, send money, fight, kill and get killed for Democracy in Tunisia or any other
                      Message 10 of 10 , Sep 3, 2012
                      • 0 Attachment
                        But where does it say in 'US Constitution' that ...
                        .
                        * ... we have to support, send money, fight, kill and get killed for 'Democracy' in Tunisia or any other country?
                        * ...  Big Companies and Corporations are also People and can compete with Votes of US Citizens using their Dollars?
                        * ... Representatives elected by people can sell their rights to whoever bids higher?
                        * ... a Political Party can lie constantly saying its going to help Senior Citizens, when it actually wants to end Medicare?
                        * ... people can be told, they would benefit from Tax Breaks to the Richest, when they never had before?
                        * ... Elected Representatives working for Capitalists can act Treasonous Enemies of Americans by keep letting millions of Illegals in USA, when Americans do not have enough jobs themselves?
                        .
                        * How come Libyan System was providing more to its thankless crazy citizens than any 'Democracy' that has existed on Earth, if 'Democracy' is the best System?
                        * How come Non Democratic Economies like Luxembourg a Kingdom, Liechtenstein a Kingdom, Singapore a One Party Government State, China a Communist state have grown faster than any 'Democratic' Country's Economy and raised Standard of Living of their people more?
                        * How come not so good Democracy of Russia, S Korea, Taiwan etc are growing a lot faster than the best 'Democracy' USA and they have not faced the same Monitory Problems like USA and her Allies?
                        * How come 'Communist' China's Economy has been growing faster than Economy of any advanced, industrialized, civilized and  authentic 'Democratic' Country?
                        .
                        No, Democracy taken over by Capitalists or people with Money is no 'Democracy of People'. Its Plutocracy of the Rich, a  Money-cracy disguised as Democracy to fool people.
                         .
                        S U Turkman

                        --- @yahoogroups.com, "jd03150" <jd03150@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > As an American who has followed Obama's career, voted for him in 2008 and will do so again in 2012, I would answer your question in the title with a resounding NO!
                        > Democracy was, is and always will be the best system for mankind, but nobody ever said it was the easiest. If you believe in democracy, you have to believe that people will sometimes make bad choices, but that cannot be used as an excuse for refusing to let people make democratic choices.
                        > It is unfortunate, but hardly a surprise that persons who lived under the previous autocratic Tunisian regime are now turning to another extreme as a reaction to what they had before. We can only hope that sanity will prevail, but we have to respect election results that accurately reflect the desires of the
                        population.
                        >
                         ---@yahoogroups.com, S Turkman <turkman@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Tunisia democratic activists fear a tilt toward militant Islam
                        > Fundamentalist Islamists in Tunisia try to exert influence on the country as it moves unsteadily toward democracy.
                        > >
                        > > An ultraconservative Muslim holds a Koran during a protest at Manouba University in Tunis after clashes between  Salafi and leftist students.
                        (Amine Landoulsi, Associated Press / August 31, 2012)  By Jeffrey Fleishman,
                        > Los Angeles Times
                        > >
                        > > August 30, 2012, 4:41 p.m.
                        > >
                        > > SIDI BOUZID, Tunisia.
                         Bearded and sweaty, they pressed in, their  faces shining in the shadow and light beneath billowing tunics hanging  for sale outside a mosque. The sun edged higher. A veiled woman hurried  past and a boy stepped closer to listen to men complain about no jobs in  fields or factories, no water in thousands of homes.
                        > >
                        > > "I didn't trust the old government and I don't trust the new one.  They lie. I trust in another revolution," said Khalid Ahmedi, his  disgust sharpening as shopkeepers slipped past him to pray. "The  constitution must be based on the Koran and our prophet. I say to the  enemies of Tunisia: We are the sons of Osama bin Laden." In this town where a fruit seller set himself on fire and inspired uprisings that swept the Arab world, men quote scripture to ease the  ills around them.
                        > > Tunisia has been regarded as a model for its  relatively smooth shift from generations of autocratic rule toward  democracy. But even as the downfall of President Zine el Abidine ben Ali  in 2011 revived political discourse, it roused deep-seated strands of  puritanical Islam that are challenging civil freedoms.
                        > >
                        > > The moderate Islamist Nahda party dominates a coalition government but is under pressure from Salafis and other fundamentalist Muslim  groups to tilt the nation closer to sharia, or Islamic law. A  proposed bill would protect "sacred values" and criminalize acts such as  images and satire against religion. A draft constitution designates  women, who make up about 25% of the constituent assembly and are among  the most liberated in the Arab world, as complementary to men in family  life.
                        > >
                        > > "The extremists here are like the Ku Klux Klan in America," said  Bayrem Kilani, a folk singer whose satirical lyrics have upset both  Islamists and Ben Ali loyalists. "We have two ways to go now: the way of  modern democracy or the way of medieval theocracy."
                        > >
                        > > Art galleries have been firebombed and ransacked, film directors  have been threatened, and a prominent
                        Nahda member was assaulted by an  extremist at a recent conference titled "Tolerance in Islam." The fervor  echoes the passion of Salafis emerging in Egypt and other nations. But  it appears more volatile in Tunisia, even though the population of  ultraconservatives is significantly smaller.
                        > >
                        > > What is unfolding here is yet another test of what will shape
                        > emerging governments in North Africa and the Middle East. The unresolved struggle between fundamentalist and moderate Islamists is the center of  a larger debate with liberals and secularists over religion's influence  on public life. It has been agitated by newly free societies that feel  both the tug of the traditional and the allure of the contemporary.
                        > >
                        > > "I think there may be a civil war," said Bochra Belhaj Hamida, a lawyer and human rights advocate. "Modern Islamists aren't in a hurry to  change
                        society, but the Salafis want to do it as quickly as possible.  They're focused on Tunisia because of our advanced civil and women's  rights. They want to win here to show the rest of the region."
                        > >
                        > > Much of the puritanical wellspring emanates from rural outposts  that for years swelled with hate for Ben Ali while dispatching militants  to conflicts in Algeria, Iraq and other countries. Fearing that  ultraconservatives will question its Islamic credentials, Nahda has done  little to stem extremist tendencies. Secularists suggest Nahda is using  Salafis to advance an agenda more radical than the party publicly  acknowledges.
                        > >
                        > > Nahda's popularity is slipping amid a high unemployment rate, discontent among youths, labor strikes and battles over religion.  Tunisians are expected to vote in a referendum on the new constitution  next year and, although the country
                        is vibrant with open debate, there  is a sense that the revolution has veered in the wrong direction.
                        > >
                        > > The Islamists are "not strong enough to mention sharia in the constitution," said Motah Elwaar, a leftist. "But if they win the next election, they will change the laws."
                        > >
                        > > The capital, Tunis, resonates with Islamist ethos and cosmopolitan  flair as if competing personalities are vying for the future. Despite  their disarray and  infighting, liberals and secularists are strong in  Tunis; a recent march to protect women's rights drew thousands into the  main boulevard, modeled after a Paris street and bearing the vestiges of  colonial rule.
                        > >
                        > > Beyond the capital's ring road and the Mediterranean coast, where highways narrow and dry valleys widen, fields and olive groves stretch  through the dust on the way to Sidi Bouzid. Poverty is rampant
                        and young  men, like Mohamed Bouazizi, the fruit seller who set himself on fire in  despair and touched off Tunisia's revolution in late 2010, stew in  empty hours.
                        > >
                        > > Down the street from Bouazizi's memorial â€" a statue of a fruit cart  the graffiti of revolt had turned into a sparse poetry of despair:  "It's a shame they stole our revolution." Soldiers stood guard at the  courthouse, where scores of dissidents are on trial for storming a  government building. Young secularists seemed unfocused and unsure of  how to make things better.
                        > >
                        > > "There's no freedom of expression. No jobs," said Ali Abidi, a blogger. "The Islamists are sitting on the town. The police can't  control them anymore. The Salafis don't like what I write. One of them  told me, 'Your end is not going to be pretty.' But we just want our  rights."
                        > >
                        > > There was
                        certainty in the voices around the mosque.
                        > >
                        > > "We are Muslims. We trust only God," said Abdel Omri, a husky man  with a full beard and skullcap shopping for sandals on the sidewalk. "We  only use the government to get our ID cards. It has no bearing on our  lives. We don't believe in man's democracy. God gave us democracy in the  Koran. God accepts and God forbids. That is all."
                        > Omri said he runs a telecommunications repair company and hires only fellow Salafis.
                        > >
                        > > "I was liberal before," he said. "I didn't know my religion. The  former regime made Islam disappear. But now I know my faith. I'm very  happy. I converted two Christians to Islam not long ago."
                        > >
                        > > Behind the mosque, in a row of shops, Ussayf Issaoni couldn't see beyond his rage: four children, high rent, water shortages, a hurting  business, a failing government. He said the
                        revolution that rose from  these streets has forsaken him. New dangers, once held at bay, have  moved closer.
                        > >
                        > > "A young bearded Salafi was sitting in front of my store," said Issaoni, who owns a phone accessory shop. "I asked him to leave. A lot  of my customers are girls and they might feel intimidated by him. He  came back with his friends and they beat me. I was in the hospital for  two weeks."
                        > >
                        > > Ben Ali's security forces arrested thousands of Islamists accused  of plotting to overthrow his government and export extremism across the  Middle East and Europe. Younger militants were inspired by foreign  Islamic fighters and by decades during which the government suppressed  even moderate Islam and dispatched state-sanctioned preachers to  mosques.
                        > >
                        > > The Salafi groups that have emerged after years of being  underground include
                        those run by older ultraconservatives who, like  their counterparts in Egypt, want a place in the new government. But  younger Salafis are more militant and resistant to compromise, regarding  secularists and liberals as Zionists and infidels. They speak of  spiritual renewal.
                        > >
                        > > "We follow the prophet. We try to change what you believe on the inside," said Mohamed Amim, sitting in a whitewashed mosque on a warm  evening with his friends. "Our goal is not to change music and cinema,  but to change the spirit."
                        > >
                        > > Nahda and other moderate Islamist organizations have yet to ease  th militant passions of a group that, although small, presents a threat  to a fledgling government beset with deep economic problems. "It will be very dangerous if we try to deny the Salafis a  political say," said Abdel Cherif, a ranking Nahda member. "Our goal is  to make them forget
                        about weapons and conflict. We want them to  participate in political life."
                        > >
                        > > jeffrey.fleishman@
                        > > Copyright © 2012, Los Angeles Times







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