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Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Blatchford patent base

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  • Lisa Davidson
    Hi, Eric, Thanks for the info. How would you compare the ease of working with Blatchford to that of Sterling? Is it worth the extra money to get the
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 5, 2008
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      Hi, Eric,

      Thanks for the info. How would you compare the ease of working with
      Blatchford to that of Sterling? Is it worth the extra money to get
      the Sterling, or might not that be perfectly flat either (of course
      the plates might not be . . . .)??

      Thank you,

      Lisa


      On Jul 4, 2008, at 2:01 PM, parallel_imp wrote:

      > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "lisaxdavidson"
      > <lisaxdavidson@...> wrote:
      >
      > > In my price-reconnoitering about Sterling honeycomb base, I came
      > across something called
      > > Blatchford patent base, which is a similar design with holes and
      > hooks. Has anyone had
      > > experience with this stuff, or even know how perfectly flat it is,
      > or how thick it is?
      >
      > Blatchford base is the same thickness as Sterling toggle base, .759"
      > for 11-point plates (though Sterling also has .688" base for 1/4"
      > dies). Blatchford was made out of a relatively light non-ferrous
      > metal, in two sizes of L-sections, and what I have is shows more
      > battering than my Sterling steel or magnesium pieces. Blatchford
      > functions exactly the same as Sterling except that the holes are
      > smaller and more closely spaced. Sterling has the advantage that it is
      > still made, hooks are easy to get. All Blatchford is used and there is
      > no source of new base or hooks, and don't expect perfectly flat
      > either. But that is partly why we do interlay makeready (packing
      > between base and plate to bring to .918")--to make up for
      > imperfections in plate and base height.
      > --Eric Holub, SF
      >
      >
      >



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • nagraph1
      I believe Sterling still makes Blatchford catches as well as the several sizes of the Sterling hooks. Sterling s heritage is that of the Printing Machinery
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 5, 2008
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        I believe Sterling still makes Blatchford catches as well as the
        several sizes of the Sterling hooks. Sterling's heritage is that of
        the Printing Machinery Corp formerly of Cincinnati, and they absorbed
        Blatchford bases, though Blatchford was once a major source of
        linecasting metal.

        Fritz


        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "parallel_imp" <Megalonyx@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "lisaxdavidson"
        > <lisaxdavidson@> wrote:
        >
        > > In my price-reconnoitering about Sterling honeycomb base, I came
        > across something called
        > > Blatchford patent base, which is a similar design with holes and
        > hooks. Has anyone had
        > > experience with this stuff, or even know how perfectly flat it
        is,
        > or how thick it is?
        >
        > Blatchford base is the same thickness as Sterling toggle base, .759"
        > for 11-point plates (though Sterling also has .688" base for 1/4"
        > dies). Blatchford was made out of a relatively light non-ferrous
        > metal, in two sizes of L-sections, and what I have is shows more
        > battering than my Sterling steel or magnesium pieces. Blatchford
        > functions exactly the same as Sterling except that the holes are
        > smaller and more closely spaced. Sterling has the advantage that it
        is
        > still made, hooks are easy to get. All Blatchford is used and there
        is
        > no source of new base or hooks, and don't expect perfectly flat
        > either. But that is partly why we do interlay makeready (packing
        > between base and plate to bring to .918")--to make up for
        > imperfections in plate and base height.
        > --Eric Holub, SF
        >
      • Fritz Klinke
        The Sterling Honeycomb bases are what are available, so it isn t really a consideration of comparing costs, except to used base and any of that that is
        Message 3 of 10 , Jul 5, 2008
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          The Sterling Honeycomb bases are what are available, so it isn't really a consideration of comparing costs, except to used base and any of that that is available, is subject to immediate question as to accuracy, etc after unknown years of use. Sterling bases are flatter and truer than any wood base and probably the equal to Bunting and Boxcar bases for accuracy.

          Fritz

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Lisa Davidson
          To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Saturday, July 05, 2008 3:00 AM
          Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Blatchford patent base



          Hi, Eric,

          Thanks for the info. How would you compare the ease of working with
          Blatchford to that of Sterling? Is it worth the extra money to get
          the Sterling, or might not that be perfectly flat either (of course
          the plates might not be . . . .)??

          Thank you,

          Lisa

          On Jul 4, 2008, at 2:01 PM, parallel_imp wrote:

          > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "lisaxdavidson"
          > <lisaxdavidson@...> wrote:
          >
          > > In my price-reconnoitering about Sterling honeycomb base, I came
          > across something called
          > > Blatchford patent base, which is a similar design with holes and
          > hooks. Has anyone had
          > > experience with this stuff, or even know how perfectly flat it is,
          > or how thick it is?
          >
          > Blatchford base is the same thickness as Sterling toggle base, .759"
          > for 11-point plates (though Sterling also has .688" base for 1/4"
          > dies). Blatchford was made out of a relatively light non-ferrous
          > metal, in two sizes of L-sections, and what I have is shows more
          > battering than my Sterling steel or magnesium pieces. Blatchford
          > functions exactly the same as Sterling except that the holes are
          > smaller and more closely spaced. Sterling has the advantage that it is
          > still made, hooks are easy to get. All Blatchford is used and there is
          > no source of new base or hooks, and don't expect perfectly flat
          > either. But that is partly why we do interlay makeready (packing
          > between base and plate to bring to .918")--to make up for
          > imperfections in plate and base height.
          > --Eric Holub, SF
          >
          >
          >

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • parallel_imp
          ... They work exactly the same, though Blatchford advertised the ease of locking up plates the size of a dime because of the close spacing of smaller holes.
          Message 4 of 10 , Jul 5, 2008
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            --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Lisa Davidson
            <lisaxdavidson@...> wrote:
            >
            > How would you compare the ease of working with
            > Blatchford to that of Sterling? Is it worth the extra money to get
            > the Sterling, or might not that be perfectly flat either (of course
            > the plates might not be . . . .)??

            They work exactly the same, though Blatchford advertised the ease of
            locking up plates the size of a dime because of the close spacing of
            smaller holes. But the only thing worth any money at all is base in
            good condition. Any piece of Blatchford base is at least forty years
            old, maybe eighty. However, even steel Sterling base can be abused,
            and anything that has been dumped in the barrel and kicked around the
            last couple decades is supect.
            I'd think a good choice would be a Blatchford or Sterling chase
            (both were available in full chases for specific presses) stored in a
            chase rack. Worst choice is a bunch of pieces from different sources
            with varying degrees of wear.
            Bear in mind that photopolymer plates must be mounted on a rigid
            plate of suitable thickness in order to use them with any patent base.
            I stress rigid because the holes in honeycomb will show in solid areas
            if there is the slightest deflection of the backing plate (well, you
            can plug the hole with dowel). In the end, there's a reason most of us
            use Bunting, Patmag or Boxcar methods of mounting photopolymer plates.
            --Eric Holub, SF
          • Lisa Davidson
            Aha, thank you, Eric. Lisa ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 10 , Jul 5, 2008
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              Aha, thank you, Eric.
              Lisa


              On Jul 5, 2008, at 11:25 AM, parallel_imp wrote:

              > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Lisa Davidson
              > <lisaxdavidson@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > How would you compare the ease of working with
              > > Blatchford to that of Sterling? Is it worth the extra money to get
              > > the Sterling, or might not that be perfectly flat either (of course
              > > the plates might not be . . . .)??
              >
              > They work exactly the same, though Blatchford advertised the ease of
              > locking up plates the size of a dime because of the close spacing of
              > smaller holes. But the only thing worth any money at all is base in
              > good condition. Any piece of Blatchford base is at least forty years
              > old, maybe eighty. However, even steel Sterling base can be abused,
              > and anything that has been dumped in the barrel and kicked around the
              > last couple decades is supect.
              > I'd think a good choice would be a Blatchford or Sterling chase
              > (both were available in full chases for specific presses) stored in a
              > chase rack. Worst choice is a bunch of pieces from different sources
              > with varying degrees of wear.
              > Bear in mind that photopolymer plates must be mounted on a rigid
              > plate of suitable thickness in order to use them with any patent base.
              > I stress rigid because the holes in honeycomb will show in solid areas
              > if there is the slightest deflection of the backing plate (well, you
              > can plug the hole with dowel). In the end, there's a reason most of us
              > use Bunting, Patmag or Boxcar methods of mounting photopolymer plates.
              > --Eric Holub, SF
              >
              >
              >



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Lamsland
              I don t have or know about the Blatchford base, but we have and still use the Sterling Honeycomb base. Matthew LAMMY Lamoureux Full Metal Press - Operis
              Message 6 of 10 , Jul 7, 2008
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                I don't have or know about the Blatchford base, but we have and still
                use the Sterling Honeycomb base.


                Matthew "LAMMY" Lamoureux
                Full Metal Press - Operis servo a specialis nundinae

                On Jul 4, 2008, at 4:16 PM, lisaxdavidson wrote:

                >
                > Hi, everyone,
                >
                > In my price-reconnoitering about Sterling honeycomb base, I came
                > across something called
                > Blatchford patent base, which is a similar design with holes and
                > hooks. Has anyone had
                > experience with this stuff, or even know how perfectly flat it is,
                > or how thick it is?
                >
                > Thanks much,
                >
                > Lisa
                >
                >
                >



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • John G. Henry
                I use both Sterling and Blatchford bases on my presses. I have chases set up with the Sterling for my cylinder press and the Blatchford for my platen press. I
                Message 7 of 10 , Jul 7, 2008
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                  I use both Sterling and Blatchford bases on my presses. I have chases
                  set up with the Sterling for my cylinder press and the Blatchford for
                  my platen press. I find no fault with either system.

                  Take care in cleaning the bases (if you purchase used) and do not use
                  any caustic cleaners (lye, paint stripper, etc.) as the magnesium base
                  will be eaten away. That comment not from experience, but from knowing
                  the physical makeup of aluminum and magnesium.

                  I use a very stiff plastic as a base for mounting my polymer plates,
                  and have good success with no show-through of the latch holes in the
                  base. I have used steel as a mounting plate material in the past as
                  well, but have switched to the plastic as it is easier to cut and bevel
                  and works well for me. Experiment with materials you find available at
                  your local home center. Polycarbonate window glazing is certainly a
                  good material, and is available in the proper caliper to mount the
                  plates I use.

                  If you do choose to use a plastic inter-base to mount the photopolymer
                  plates, make certain you do not tighten the hooks so tight that they
                  cause the plate to warp when locked up.

                  Of course, the bases are wonderful for mounting 11pt. engravings and
                  embossing dies.
                • Lisa Davidson
                  Thanks, John, that s extremely helpful. Lisa ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jul 7, 2008
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                    Thanks, John, that's extremely helpful.
                    Lisa

                    On Jul 7, 2008, at 8:29 AM, John G. Henry wrote:

                    > I use both Sterling and Blatchford bases on my presses. I have chases
                    > set up with the Sterling for my cylinder press and the Blatchford for
                    > my platen press. I find no fault with either system.
                    >
                    > Take care in cleaning the bases (if you purchase used) and do not use
                    > any caustic cleaners (lye, paint stripper, etc.) as the magnesium base
                    > will be eaten away. That comment not from experience, but from knowing
                    > the physical makeup of aluminum and magnesium.
                    >
                    > I use a very stiff plastic as a base for mounting my polymer plates,
                    > and have good success with no show-through of the latch holes in the
                    > base. I have used steel as a mounting plate material in the past as
                    > well, but have switched to the plastic as it is easier to cut and
                    > bevel
                    > and works well for me. Experiment with materials you find available at
                    > your local home center. Polycarbonate window glazing is certainly a
                    > good material, and is available in the proper caliper to mount the
                    > plates I use.
                    >
                    > If you do choose to use a plastic inter-base to mount the photopolymer
                    > plates, make certain you do not tighten the hooks so tight that they
                    > cause the plate to warp when locked up.
                    >
                    > Of course, the bases are wonderful for mounting 11pt. engravings and
                    > embossing dies.
                    >
                    >
                    >



                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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