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Kreen and film cleaner

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  • Casey McGarr
    What is the best method for cleaning the film and Kreen before processing a plate. I ve seen anti static brushes for airborne material. Any suggestions would
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 12 8:59 AM
      What is the best method for cleaning the film and Kreen before processing a plate.

      I've seen anti static brushes for airborne material.

      Any suggestions would be very helpful.

      Thanks,
      Casey
    • parallel_imp
      ... processing a plate. ... I use PEC-12 archival Photographuc Emulsion Cleaner for film, available from photographic suppliers, and isopropyl alcohol for
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 12 10:03 AM
        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Casey McGarr" <casey@...> wrote:
        >
        > What is the best method for cleaning the film and Kreen before
        processing a plate.
        >
        > I've seen anti static brushes for airborne material.
        >

        I use PEC-12 archival Photographuc Emulsion Cleaner for film,
        available from photographic suppliers, and isopropyl alcohol for
        cleaning the krene. The alcohol may also be used on the film. But
        either will remove any but water-based opaques. I tried Pressine
        aerosol film cleaner and it damaged the krene (made it pucker).
        No brush here, I just try to do the cleaning without generating any
        static to attract dust, hair, etc. And I look carefully for anything
        in the image area when the vacuum drawdown is complete.
        --Eric Holub, SF
      • nagraph1
        A few weeks ago I was talking to our main polymer supplier, Jet USA and they said some plants actually change the kreene each day, and I was very surprised at
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 12 10:13 AM
          A few weeks ago I was talking to our main polymer supplier, Jet USA
          and they said some plants actually change the kreene each day, and I
          was very surprised at this. This is typically in plants using flexo
          for printing medical boxes where the type is almost miniature and
          they can't afford any screwups in dosage or usage instructions, and
          the printing is done in multiple colors. Since the material is not
          that expensive, they said they'll sell a plant large quantities of
          the material at a time. And I plod one with one that is slightly
          older than a day by a couple of years, and still get excellent
          results.

          fritz

          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "parallel_imp" <Megalonyx@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Casey McGarr" <casey@> wrote:
          > >
          > > What is the best method for cleaning the film and Kreen before
          > processing a plate.
          > >
          > > I've seen anti static brushes for airborne material.
          > >
          >
          > I use PEC-12 archival Photographuc Emulsion Cleaner for film,
          > available from photographic suppliers, and isopropyl alcohol for
          > cleaning the krene. The alcohol may also be used on the film. But
          > either will remove any but water-based opaques. I tried Pressine
          > aerosol film cleaner and it damaged the krene (made it pucker).
          > No brush here, I just try to do the cleaning without generating
          any
          > static to attract dust, hair, etc. And I look carefully for anything
          > in the image area when the vacuum drawdown is complete.
          > --Eric Holub, SF
          >
        • Gerald Lange
          Hi Casey There are products for cleaning solvent and debris from film negatives but generally a spraying of compressed air will suffice to clean them of dust.
          Message 4 of 8 , Jun 12 12:25 PM
            Hi Casey

            There are products for cleaning solvent and debris from film negatives
            but generally a spraying of compressed air will suffice to clean them
            of dust. Make that a routine. Blow raw material off as well before
            placing on the vacuum frame.

            I also use compressed air whenever I open the exposing unit, blowing
            above and below the Kreene. Kreene itself can be cleaned with rubbing
            alcohol. It's amazing how marked up it can get over time.

            I've also found replacement of the Kreene to be necessary on a fairly
            routine basis. Eventually it seems to take on a mind of its own and
            fails to properly secure during vacuum. At that point, it becomes a
            liability. You can buy the stuff in rolls and a roll is going to last
            you a good long time.

            My processing is done in a small darkroom so, while dust does
            accumulate on stuff over time, I can't say that airborne material is
            much of a problem that can be dealt with the compressed air spray.

            Gerald
            http://BielerPress.blogspot.com

            --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Casey McGarr" <casey@...> wrote:
            >
            > What is the best method for cleaning the film and Kreen before
            processing a plate.
            >
            > I've seen anti static brushes for airborne material.
            >
            > Any suggestions would be very helpful.
            >
            > Thanks,
            > Casey
            >
          • Gerald Lange
            Casey Just a further note on this. The machine s cooling fans do a fairly good job of self cleaning and removing air borne material. Several years ago someone
            Message 5 of 8 , Jun 12 12:39 PM
              Casey

              Just a further note on this.

              The machine's cooling fans do a fairly good job of self cleaning and
              removing air borne material. Several years ago someone wrote that
              their bulbs were filthy with dirt and after a response or two it
              turned out he had disconnected the fans because of the noise they
              generated.

              Gerald
              http://BielerPress.blogspot.com

              --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Gerald Lange" <Bieler@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi Casey
              >
              > There are products for cleaning solvent and debris from film negatives
              > but generally a spraying of compressed air will suffice to clean them
              > of dust. Make that a routine. Blow raw material off as well before
              > placing on the vacuum frame.
              >
              > I also use compressed air whenever I open the exposing unit, blowing
              > above and below the Kreene. Kreene itself can be cleaned with rubbing
              > alcohol. It's amazing how marked up it can get over time.
              >
              > I've also found replacement of the Kreene to be necessary on a fairly
              > routine basis. Eventually it seems to take on a mind of its own and
              > fails to properly secure during vacuum. At that point, it becomes a
              > liability. You can buy the stuff in rolls and a roll is going to last
              > you a good long time.
              >
              > My processing is done in a small darkroom so, while dust does
              > accumulate on stuff over time, I can't say that airborne material is
              > much of a problem that can be dealt with the compressed air spray.
              >
              > Gerald
              > http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
              >
              > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Casey McGarr" <casey@> wrote:
              > >
              > > What is the best method for cleaning the film and Kreen before
              > processing a plate.
              > >
              > > I've seen anti static brushes for airborne material.
              > >
              > > Any suggestions would be very helpful.
              > >
              > > Thanks,
              > > Casey
              > >
              >
            • Casey McGarr
              Eric, I ll check out this PEC-12 for the film, thanks for the tips. Casey
              Message 6 of 8 , Jun 12 8:59 PM
                Eric,

                I'll check out this PEC-12 for the film, thanks for the tips.

                Casey


                > I use PEC-12 archival Photographuc Emulsion Cleaner for film,
                > available from photographic suppliers, and isopropyl alcohol for
                > cleaning the krene. The alcohol may also be used on the film. But
                > either will remove any but water-based opaques. I tried Pressine
                > aerosol film cleaner and it damaged the krene (made it pucker).
                > No brush here, I just try to do the cleaning without generating any
                > static to attract dust, hair, etc. And I look carefully for anything
                > in the image area when the vacuum drawdown is complete.
                > --Eric Holub, SF
                >
              • Casey McGarr
                Gerald, I ll get some air, that seems to be the best option along with the alcohol for the Kreen. I m happy to hear about the Kreen replacement timeframe. I
                Message 7 of 8 , Jun 12 9:17 PM
                  Gerald,

                  I'll get some air, that seems to be the best option along with the alcohol for the Kreen.

                  I'm happy to hear about the Kreen replacement timeframe. I may be in need to purchase
                  some as I've noticed some week spots.

                  Thanks again for the advice.

                  Casey
                  www.inkylipspress.com



                  > There are products for cleaning solvent and debris from film negatives
                  > but generally a spraying of compressed air will suffice to clean them
                  > of dust. Make that a routine. Blow raw material off as well before
                  > placing on the vacuum frame.
                  >
                  > I also use compressed air whenever I open the exposing unit, blowing
                  > above and below the Kreene. Kreene itself can be cleaned with rubbing
                  > alcohol. It's amazing how marked up it can get over time.
                  >
                  > I've also found replacement of the Kreene to be necessary on a fairly
                  > routine basis. Eventually it seems to take on a mind of its own and
                  > fails to properly secure during vacuum. At that point, it becomes a
                  > liability. You can buy the stuff in rolls and a roll is going to last
                  > you a good long time.
                  >
                  > My processing is done in a small darkroom so, while dust does
                  > accumulate on stuff over time, I can't say that airborne material is
                  > much of a problem that can be dealt with the compressed air spray.
                  >
                  > Gerald
                  > http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
                • Gerald Lange
                  Fritz According to Boxcar s new website they change the Kreene every couple of days or so. I change it reluctantly whenever it starts to fail on me, every
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jun 12 9:25 PM
                    Fritz

                    According to Boxcar's new website they change the Kreene every couple
                    of days or so. I change it reluctantly whenever it starts to fail on
                    me, every couple of months or so. You must be doing something right.

                    Gerald
                    http://BielerPress.blogspot.com

                    --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "nagraph1" <nagraph@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > A few weeks ago I was talking to our main polymer supplier, Jet USA
                    > and they said some plants actually change the kreene each day, and I
                    > was very surprised at this. This is typically in plants using flexo
                    > for printing medical boxes where the type is almost miniature and
                    > they can't afford any screwups in dosage or usage instructions, and
                    > the printing is done in multiple colors. Since the material is not
                    > that expensive, they said they'll sell a plant large quantities of
                    > the material at a time. And I plod one with one that is slightly
                    > older than a day by a couple of years, and still get excellent
                    > results.
                    >
                    > fritz
                    >
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