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Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Early editioning on a Vandercook

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  • Fritz Klinke
    The Bread Loaf School is part of Middlebury College and has been in continuous operation during the summers since 1920. George Chapman here in Silverton
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 9, 2008
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      The Bread Loaf School is part of Middlebury College and has been in continuous operation during the summers since 1920. George Chapman here in Silverton informed me that one of our locals, Dave Emory, is there this summer, but doubts that letterpress is still on the summer program.

      Fritz

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Paul Moxon
      To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, June 09, 2008 7:08 AM
      Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Early editioning on a Vandercook


      DeWitt authored a brief instructional manual "Operation of the No. 3 Vandercook Proof
      Press" published by the Rochester Athenaeum and Mechanics Institute, 1941.

      --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "nagraph1" <nagraph@...> wrote:
      >
      > I read with interest in the November 1940 and January 1941 issues of
      > the Inland Printer about the printing of a book on a Vandercook #3
      > press. The students at the Bread Loaf School of English in Middlebury
      > Vermont compiled, edited, and set (hand set type) a book
      > entitled "Stops--a handbook for those who know their punctuation and
      > for those who aren't quite sure." There were 18 students and the
      > instructor, Frank DeWitt, of the Rochester (NY) Athenaeum and Mechanics
      > Institute. The small book ran 37 pages of set type.
      >
      > This is covered in The Proofroom column written by Edward N. Teall in
      > the November issue, and then in the January 1941 issue is a picture of
      > one of the students printing what appears to be a 2 page spread of the
      > book on the #3 Vandercook. I have suspected that Vandercooks have been
      > used in printing private press work and small editions of books long
      > before Vandercooks or similar flat bed proof presses have been given
      > credit for this kind of work. I think that in particular, school and
      > university settings lend themselves to this type of work, and perhaps
      > as far back as these presses have been available. Much of this work was
      > perishable from perhaps the day it was printed, but the usefulness of
      > these machines for "editioning" has been recognized for a long time.
      >





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