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CO2 Lasers for Polymer Plates

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  • davidgeorgeglover
    Has anyone tried making plates from the CO2 lasers? They seem to avoid the exposure problems and the washout problems. Does anyone have any insight or
    Message 1 of 6 , May 25, 2008
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      Has anyone tried making plates from the CO2 lasers?
      They seem to avoid the exposure problems and the washout problems.

      Does anyone have any insight or experience with them?
    • Joe Freedman
      ... The resolution is not as good using a laser as photo based plates. Also the laser time is just way too long--half an hour for a small plate at high
      Message 2 of 6 , May 26, 2008
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        > Has anyone tried making plates from the CO2 lasers?
        > They seem to avoid the exposure problems and the washout problems.

        The resolution is not as good using a laser as photo based plates.
        Also the laser time is just way too long--half an hour for a small
        plate at high resolution.

        I tried it and it didn't work out. Photo exposure is much much better.

        Joe

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Lamsland
        I ve thought of it but even the lowest end engravers are very expensive unless your making a ton of plates. I was considering cutting steel or aluminum plates
        Message 3 of 6 , May 27, 2008
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          I've thought of it but even the lowest end engravers are very
          expensive unless your making a ton of plates. I was considering
          cutting steel or aluminum plates with it. Possibly wood. I didn't
          think you'd get a decent cut on a polymer material as the laser
          essentially vaporizes the material and the heat produced would effect
          the surrounding material.


          Matthew "LAMMY" Lamoureux
          Full Metal Press - Operis servo a specialis nundinae

          On May 26, 2008, at 1:27 AM, davidgeorgeglover wrote:

          > Has anyone tried making plates from the CO2 lasers?
          > They seem to avoid the exposure problems and the washout problems.
          >
          > Does anyone have any insight or experience with them?
          >
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Labpress
          I don t know what a CO2 laser is but I can tell you that students here at Otis College of Art and Design are having great luck taking their linoblocks to our
          Message 4 of 6 , May 27, 2008
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            I don't know what a CO2 laser is but I can tell you that students here at
            Otis College of Art and Design are having great luck taking their linoblocks
            to our laser cutter in the machine shop using a computer file and then
            printing letterpress. They have gottem some very fine lines and excellent
            prints as long as they don¹t try to save money by having a shorter relief.
            Linda



            --
            Linda Dare, Manager
            Otis laboratory Press
            Otis College of Art and Design
            9045 Lincoln Blvd.
            Los Angeles, CA 90045
            310.665.6846
            www.otis.edu/labpress/



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • idgradstudent
            What kind of laser cutter and what settings? I have a laser engraver 10ft from my windmill, and have never been able to get acceptable plate quality from it
            Message 5 of 6 , May 29, 2008
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              What kind of laser cutter and what settings? I have a laser engraver
              10ft from my windmill, and have never been able to get acceptable
              plate quality from it with any materials I have tried so far.

              P.S. most "laser cutters" or "laser engravers" are CO2, unless it is a
              YAG, which is for marking metal.

              Glenwood

              --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Labpress <labpress@...> wrote:
              >
              > I don't know what a CO2 laser is but I can tell you that students
              here at
              > Otis College of Art and Design are having great luck taking their
              linoblocks
              > to our laser cutter in the machine shop using a computer file and then
              > printing letterpress. They have gottem some very fine lines and
              excellent
              > prints as long as they don¹t try to save money by having a shorter
              relief.
              > Linda
              >
              >
              >
              > --
              > Linda Dare, Manager
              > Otis laboratory Press
              > Otis College of Art and Design
              > 9045 Lincoln Blvd.
              > Los Angeles, CA 90045
              > 310.665.6846
              > www.otis.edu/labpress/
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            • Labpress
              Hi Glenwood, The wood shop is using a X-660 Laser Engraving and Cutting Systems from Universal Laser Systems in Scotsdale, AZ. It is a 60 watt laser cutter
              Message 6 of 6 , Jun 2, 2008
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                Hi Glenwood,
                The wood shop is using a X-660 Laser Engraving and Cutting Systems from
                Universal Laser Systems in Scotsdale, AZ.
                It is a 60 watt laser cutter running on compressed air. The lab technician
                punches in the settings: how fast, how many times firing and how deep.
                As I say we are using this process, not for polymer plates but for linoleum
                cuts so the fine lines are quite remarkable for linocut and the smell of
                burnt wood in the print shop is unique.
                Linda

                --
                Linda Dare, Manager
                Otis Laboratory Press
                Otis College of Art and Design
                9045 Lincoln Blvd.
                Los Angeles, CA 90045
                310.665.6846
                www.otis.edu/labpress/



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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