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Reconstructing Gutenburg's Press

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  • Susan Angebranndt
    Recently there s been a series on the BBC in the UK called The Medieval Season , and one of the installments is called The Machine That Made Us , all about
    Message 1 of 26 , Apr 24, 2008
      Recently there's been a series on the BBC in the UK called "The Medieval
      Season", and one of the installments is called "The Machine That Made Us",
      all about Gutenberg. Stephen Fry is the presenter and among other things he
      shows how the first metal type was cast and speculates about how the first
      press worked (there apparently aren't any extent pictures or plans for that
      first press). Part of the documentary is about building a working version
      of what that first press might have been like. You can watch the show on
      YouTube -- in 6 10 minute installments starting with this one:
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=91smRXrEPRs

      Susan
    • Gary Johanson
      It s a fascinating watch. Curious who it was who sent the form for the page they actually printed (into which they inserted the home- made e )? If they said
      Message 2 of 26 , Apr 24, 2008
        It's a fascinating watch. Curious who it was who sent the form for
        the page they actually printed (into which they inserted the home-
        made "e")? If they said who, I missed it. M&H supplied for the
        Smith in the past, I wonder if it might be them?

        I wish there were actually a plan on paper to actually construct a
        simple single pull press like that shown on the BBC video . . .
        maybe without the wooden screw. I'd settle for iron or steel
        there :>) Perhaps just large enough to handle a 5x7 Kelsey chase.
        Just enough to demonstrate and pull a respectable print. I
        volunteer at the print shop of a teaching museum in Central Florida,
        and while we have no shortage of Gordon style job presses and a
        Kelsey collection, nothing beats demonstrating the quantum leap
        between the 1780's and the 1880's in press technology - especially
        the speed - like having the real thing to demonstrate. It's hard to
        appreciate how fast 20 impressions per minute by one press operator
        is as compared to 3 or 4 per minute with a trained crew of two or
        three.

        Simple (and massive) as those Common Presses were, they are a
        marvelous device to see in full vigour and action with a trained
        crew. I really appreciate those YouTube videos being made
        available. I would be willing to purchase a few DVDs of the special
        for use at the Museum if the BBC made them available.

        Your Humble Servant
        Gary Johanson, Settlement Printer
        Florida Pioneer Settlement for the Creative Arts
        Barberville, Fl.
        http://www.qsl.net/wd4nka/TEXTS/press.html
        http://www.gjohanson.blogspot.com



        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Susan Angebranndt <susan@...>
        wrote:
        >
        >
        > Recently there's been a series on the BBC in the UK called "The
        Medieval
        > Season", and one of the installments is called "The Machine That
        Made Us",
        > all about Gutenberg. Stephen Fry is the presenter and among other
        things he
        > shows how the first metal type was cast and speculates about how
        the first
        > press worked (there apparently aren't any extent pictures or plans
        for that
        > first press). Part of the documentary is about building a working
        version
        > of what that first press might have been like. You can watch the
        show on
        > YouTube -- in 6 10 minute installments starting with this one:
        > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=91smRXrEPRs
        >
        > Susan
        >
      • David McNamara
        Gary, This production was discussed a bit over on that other letterpress list, and I think someone said that it was M&H who did the form. (I don t remember the
        Message 3 of 26 , Apr 24, 2008
          Gary,

          This production was discussed a bit over on that other letterpress list, and I think someone said that it was M&H who did the form. (I don't remember the program giving credit, either, which strikes me as unfortunate.)
          __

          David
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Gary Johanson
          To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thursday, April 24, 2008 10:34 PM
          Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Reconstructing Gutenburg's Press


          It's a fascinating watch. Curious who it was who sent the form for
          the page they actually printed (into which they inserted the home-
          made "e")? If they said who, I missed it. M&H supplied for the
          Smith in the past, I wonder if it might be them?

          I wish there were actually a plan on paper to actually construct a
          simple single pull press like that shown on the BBC video . . .
          maybe without the wooden screw. I'd settle for iron or steel
          there :>) Perhaps just large enough to handle a 5x7 Kelsey chase.
          Just enough to demonstrate and pull a respectable print. I
          volunteer at the print shop of a teaching museum in Central Florida,
          and while we have no shortage of Gordon style job presses and a
          Kelsey collection, nothing beats demonstrating the quantum leap
          between the 1780's and the 1880's in press technology - especially
          the speed - like having the real thing to demonstrate. It's hard to
          appreciate how fast 20 impressions per minute by one press operator
          is as compared to 3 or 4 per minute with a trained crew of two or
          three.

          Simple (and massive) as those Common Presses were, they are a
          marvelous device to see in full vigour and action with a trained
          crew. I really appreciate those YouTube videos being made
          available. I would be willing to purchase a few DVDs of the special
          for use at the Museum if the BBC made them available.

          Your Humble Servant
          Gary Johanson, Settlement Printer
          Florida Pioneer Settlement for the Creative Arts
          Barberville, Fl.
          http://www.qsl.net/wd4nka/TEXTS/press.html
          http://www.gjohanson.blogspot.com

          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Susan Angebranndt <susan@...>
          wrote:
          >
          >
          > Recently there's been a series on the BBC in the UK called "The
          Medieval
          > Season", and one of the installments is called "The Machine That
          Made Us",
          > all about Gutenberg. Stephen Fry is the presenter and among other
          things he
          > shows how the first metal type was cast and speculates about how
          the first
          > press worked (there apparently aren't any extent pictures or plans
          for that
          > first press). Part of the documentary is about building a working
          version
          > of what that first press might have been like. You can watch the
          show on
          > YouTube -- in 6 10 minute installments starting with this one:
          > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=91smRXrEPRs
          >
          > Susan
          >





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Gerald Lange
          Gary Godine put out a book a long while back titled The Common Press by Elizabeth M Harris of the Smithsonian, which included technical illustrations of its
          Message 4 of 26 , Apr 24, 2008
            Gary

            Godine put out a book a long while back titled The Common Press by
            Elizabeth M Harris of the Smithsonian, which included technical
            illustrations of its construction. This is still available from online
            antiquarian sources (around $100 or so).

            Gerald
            http://BielerPress.blogspot.com

            --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Gary Johanson" <wd4nka@...> wrote:
            >
            > It's a fascinating watch. Curious who it was who sent the form for
            > the page they actually printed (into which they inserted the home-
            > made "e")? If they said who, I missed it. M&H supplied for the
            > Smith in the past, I wonder if it might be them?
            >
            > I wish there were actually a plan on paper to actually construct a
            > simple single pull press like that shown on the BBC video . . .
            > maybe without the wooden screw. I'd settle for iron or steel
            > there :>) Perhaps just large enough to handle a 5x7 Kelsey chase.
            > Just enough to demonstrate and pull a respectable print. I
            > volunteer at the print shop of a teaching museum in Central Florida,
            > and while we have no shortage of Gordon style job presses and a
            > Kelsey collection, nothing beats demonstrating the quantum leap
            > between the 1780's and the 1880's in press technology - especially
            > the speed - like having the real thing to demonstrate. It's hard to
            > appreciate how fast 20 impressions per minute by one press operator
            > is as compared to 3 or 4 per minute with a trained crew of two or
            > three.
            >
            > Simple (and massive) as those Common Presses were, they are a
            > marvelous device to see in full vigour and action with a trained
            > crew. I really appreciate those YouTube videos being made
            > available. I would be willing to purchase a few DVDs of the special
            > for use at the Museum if the BBC made them available.
            >
            > Your Humble Servant
            > Gary Johanson, Settlement Printer
            > Florida Pioneer Settlement for the Creative Arts
            > Barberville, Fl.
            > http://www.qsl.net/wd4nka/TEXTS/press.html
            > http://www.gjohanson.blogspot.com
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Susan Angebranndt <susan@>
            > wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > > Recently there's been a series on the BBC in the UK called "The
            > Medieval
            > > Season", and one of the installments is called "The Machine That
            > Made Us",
            > > all about Gutenberg. Stephen Fry is the presenter and among other
            > things he
            > > shows how the first metal type was cast and speculates about how
            > the first
            > > press worked (there apparently aren't any extent pictures or plans
            > for that
            > > first press). Part of the documentary is about building a working
            > version
            > > of what that first press might have been like. You can watch the
            > show on
            > > YouTube -- in 6 10 minute installments starting with this one:
            > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=91smRXrEPRs
            > >
            > > Susan
            > >
            >
          • mike day
            The font was from Dale Guild. The font was their recreation of the Gutenburg font, B-42. Mike On Thu, Apr 24, 2008 at 7:50 PM, David McNamara
            Message 5 of 26 , Apr 24, 2008
              The font was from Dale Guild. The font was their recreation of the Gutenburg
              font, B-42.

              Mike



              On Thu, Apr 24, 2008 at 7:50 PM, David McNamara <david@...>
              wrote:

              > Gary,
              >
              > This production was discussed a bit over on that other letterpress list,
              > and I think someone said that it was M&H who did the form. (I don't remember
              > the program giving credit, either, which strikes me as unfortunate.)
              > __
              >
              > David
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: Gary Johanson
              > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com <PPLetterpress%40yahoogroups.com>
              > Sent: Thursday, April 24, 2008 10:34 PM
              > Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Reconstructing Gutenburg's Press
              >
              > It's a fascinating watch. Curious who it was who sent the form for
              > the page they actually printed (into which they inserted the home-
              > made "e")? If they said who, I missed it. M&H supplied for the
              > Smith in the past, I wonder if it might be them?
              >
              > I wish there were actually a plan on paper to actually construct a
              > simple single pull press like that shown on the BBC video . . .
              > maybe without the wooden screw. I'd settle for iron or steel
              > there :>) Perhaps just large enough to handle a 5x7 Kelsey chase.
              > Just enough to demonstrate and pull a respectable print. I
              > volunteer at the print shop of a teaching museum in Central Florida,
              > and while we have no shortage of Gordon style job presses and a
              > Kelsey collection, nothing beats demonstrating the quantum leap
              > between the 1780's and the 1880's in press technology - especially
              > the speed - like having the real thing to demonstrate. It's hard to
              > appreciate how fast 20 impressions per minute by one press operator
              > is as compared to 3 or 4 per minute with a trained crew of two or
              > three.
              >
              > Simple (and massive) as those Common Presses were, they are a
              > marvelous device to see in full vigour and action with a trained
              > crew. I really appreciate those YouTube videos being made
              > available. I would be willing to purchase a few DVDs of the special
              > for use at the Museum if the BBC made them available.
              >
              > Your Humble Servant
              > Gary Johanson, Settlement Printer
              > Florida Pioneer Settlement for the Creative Arts
              > Barberville, Fl.
              > http://www.qsl.net/wd4nka/TEXTS/press.html
              > http://www.gjohanson.blogspot.com
              >
              > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com <PPLetterpress%40yahoogroups.com>,
              > Susan Angebranndt <susan@...>
              > wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > > Recently there's been a series on the BBC in the UK called "The
              > Medieval
              > > Season", and one of the installments is called "The Machine That
              > Made Us",
              > > all about Gutenberg. Stephen Fry is the presenter and among other
              > things he
              > > shows how the first metal type was cast and speculates about how
              > the first
              > > press worked (there apparently aren't any extent pictures or plans
              > for that
              > > first press). Part of the documentary is about building a working
              > version
              > > of what that first press might have been like. You can watch the
              > show on
              > > YouTube -- in 6 10 minute installments starting with this one:
              > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=91smRXrEPRs
              > >
              > > Susan
              > >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >



              --
              Mike Day
              Long Day Press
              Sunnyvale CA


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Gerald Lange
              The only problem with the Rehak reconstruction was that it is the typical 20th/21st century approach to historical typeface reconstruction. Pick the best
              Message 6 of 26 , Apr 24, 2008
                The only problem with the Rehak reconstruction was that it is the
                typical 20th/21st century approach to historical typeface
                reconstruction. Pick the best letter you can find and use that as
                representative. Unfortunately, throughout the period of Incunabula,
                from Schoeffer into Aldus, letterforms were deliberately randomized.
                The standardization of typecast letterforms is post Incunabula.

                Anything set without this understanding is in no way going to
                recapture the look of B42 or other Incunabula.

                Gerald
                http://BielerPress.blogspot.com

                --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "mike day" <vangogh1888@...> wrote:
                >
                > The font was from Dale Guild. The font was their recreation of the
                Gutenburg
                > font, B-42.
                >
                > Mike
                >
                >
                >
                > On Thu, Apr 24, 2008 at 7:50 PM, David McNamara <david@...>
                > wrote:
                >
                > > Gary,
                > >
                > > This production was discussed a bit over on that other letterpress
                list,
                > > and I think someone said that it was M&H who did the form. (I
                don't remember
                > > the program giving credit, either, which strikes me as unfortunate.)
                > > __
                > >
                > > David
                > > ----- Original Message -----
                > > From: Gary Johanson
                > > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com <PPLetterpress%40yahoogroups.com>
                > > Sent: Thursday, April 24, 2008 10:34 PM
                > > Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Reconstructing Gutenburg's Press
                > >
                > > It's a fascinating watch. Curious who it was who sent the form for
                > > the page they actually printed (into which they inserted the home-
                > > made "e")? If they said who, I missed it. M&H supplied for the
                > > Smith in the past, I wonder if it might be them?
                > >
                > > I wish there were actually a plan on paper to actually construct a
                > > simple single pull press like that shown on the BBC video . . .
                > > maybe without the wooden screw. I'd settle for iron or steel
                > > there :>) Perhaps just large enough to handle a 5x7 Kelsey chase.
                > > Just enough to demonstrate and pull a respectable print. I
                > > volunteer at the print shop of a teaching museum in Central Florida,
                > > and while we have no shortage of Gordon style job presses and a
                > > Kelsey collection, nothing beats demonstrating the quantum leap
                > > between the 1780's and the 1880's in press technology - especially
                > > the speed - like having the real thing to demonstrate. It's hard to
                > > appreciate how fast 20 impressions per minute by one press operator
                > > is as compared to 3 or 4 per minute with a trained crew of two or
                > > three.
                > >
                > > Simple (and massive) as those Common Presses were, they are a
                > > marvelous device to see in full vigour and action with a trained
                > > crew. I really appreciate those YouTube videos being made
                > > available. I would be willing to purchase a few DVDs of the special
                > > for use at the Museum if the BBC made them available.
                > >
                > > Your Humble Servant
                > > Gary Johanson, Settlement Printer
                > > Florida Pioneer Settlement for the Creative Arts
                > > Barberville, Fl.
                > > http://www.qsl.net/wd4nka/TEXTS/press.html
                > > http://www.gjohanson.blogspot.com
                > >
                > > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                <PPLetterpress%40yahoogroups.com>,
                > > Susan Angebranndt <susan@>
                > > wrote:
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > Recently there's been a series on the BBC in the UK called "The
                > > Medieval
                > > > Season", and one of the installments is called "The Machine That
                > > Made Us",
                > > > all about Gutenberg. Stephen Fry is the presenter and among other
                > > things he
                > > > shows how the first metal type was cast and speculates about how
                > > the first
                > > > press worked (there apparently aren't any extent pictures or plans
                > > for that
                > > > first press). Part of the documentary is about building a working
                > > version
                > > > of what that first press might have been like. You can watch the
                > > show on
                > > > YouTube -- in 6 10 minute installments starting with this one:
                > > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=91smRXrEPRs
                > > >
                > > > Susan
                > > >
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                > --
                > Mike Day
                > Long Day Press
                > Sunnyvale CA
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • Farida Bee
                Gary, The page was set (and sent) by Kitty Maryatt, Director of the Scripps College Press in Claremont, California. As noted by Mike Day, the type was cast by
                Message 7 of 26 , Apr 24, 2008
                  Gary,

                  The page was set (and sent) by Kitty Maryatt, Director of the Scripps College Press in Claremont, California. As noted by Mike Day, the type was cast by Dale Guild Typefoundry.

                  Farida Sunada

                  <<<
                  From: Gary Johanson
                  Curious who it was who sent the form for the page they actually printed (into which they inserted the home-made "e")?


                  ____________________________________________________________________________________
                  Be a better friend, newshound, and
                  know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now. http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Gary Johanson
                  Thanks for the info. Sorry about taking so long to acknowledge. Seems lately I am lucky to get posts out on a weekly basis. I am curious about authentically
                  Message 8 of 26 , Apr 28, 2008
                    Thanks for the info. Sorry about taking so long to acknowledge. Seems
                    lately I am lucky to get posts out on a weekly basis.

                    I am curious about authentically cast type because I am considering
                    reprinting portions of Dr. Stearns "American Herbal", using matched
                    fonts set in as near to the same form as I am able at my level of
                    operation. Seeing that form on the BBC documentary made me wonder
                    just how close I could copy Carlisle's original work in the American
                    Herbal.

                    I hope to bring at least a part of this volume back to life, and also
                    create awareness of the pioneer Doctor who suffered for his beliefs
                    and took a very unpopular stand during a very trying time, which
                    followed him for the rest of his life.

                    Gary Johanson, Printer
                    Florida Pioneer Settlement for the Creative Arts
                  • nagraph1
                    If you know the type face and size, then see what s available as off- the-shelf type or something that has to be cast. The B-42 used in the BBC program is the
                    Message 9 of 26 , Apr 28, 2008
                      If you know the type face and size, then see what's available as off-
                      the-shelf type or something that has to be cast. The B-42 used in the
                      BBC program is the only accurate reproduction "Gutenberg" type
                      available, and with some 270 characters, I think Theo Rehak and Alan
                      Waring came as close to reproducing in metal what the actual type was
                      as is possible. There is no other source for the B-42 type.

                      Fritz

                      --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Gary Johanson" <wd4nka@...>
                      wrote:
                      >
                      > Thanks for the info. Sorry about taking so long to acknowledge.
                      Seems
                      > lately I am lucky to get posts out on a weekly basis.
                      >
                      > I am curious about authentically cast type because I am considering
                      > reprinting portions of Dr. Stearns "American Herbal", using matched
                      > fonts set in as near to the same form as I am able at my level of
                      > operation. Seeing that form on the BBC documentary made me wonder
                      > just how close I could copy Carlisle's original work in the
                      American
                      > Herbal.
                      >
                      > I hope to bring at least a part of this volume back to life, and
                      also
                      > create awareness of the pioneer Doctor who suffered for his beliefs
                      > and took a very unpopular stand during a very trying time, which
                      > followed him for the rest of his life.
                      >
                      > Gary Johanson, Printer
                      > Florida Pioneer Settlement for the Creative Arts
                      >
                    • Lamsland
                      Oh no! Did anyone manage to download these videos? I want to show a pressman at work but. . . . This video is no longer available due to a copyright claim by
                      Message 10 of 26 , May 14, 2008
                        Oh no!

                        Did anyone manage to download these videos? I want to show a pressman
                        at work but. . . .

                        This video is no longer available due to a copyright claim by British
                        Broadcasting Corporation


                        Matthew "LAMMY" Lamoureux
                        Full Metal Press - Operis servo a specialis nundinae

                        On Apr 24, 2008, at 8:49 PM, Susan Angebranndt wrote:

                        >
                        > Recently there's been a series on the BBC in the UK called "The
                        > Medieval
                        > Season", and one of the installments is called "The Machine That
                        > Made Us",
                        > all about Gutenberg. Stephen Fry is the presenter and among other
                        > things he
                        > shows how the first metal type was cast and speculates about how
                        > the first
                        > press worked (there apparently aren't any extent pictures or plans
                        > for that
                        > first press). Part of the documentary is about building a working
                        > version
                        > of what that first press might have been like. You can watch the
                        > show on
                        > YouTube -- in 6 10 minute installments starting with this one:
                        > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=91smRXrEPRs
                        >
                        > Susan
                        >
                        >



                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Erik Desmyter
                        ... it is still here: http://www.dontpressme.com/video/gutenberg.html Regards, Erik
                        Message 11 of 26 , May 14, 2008
                          > Lamsland wrote: I want to show a pressman
                          > at work but. . . .
                          > This video is no longer available due to a copyright claim
                          > by British Broadcasting Corporation


                          it is still here:
                          http://www.dontpressme.com/video/gutenberg.html

                          Regards,
                          Erik
                        • Casey McGarr
                          Lammy, I have the video but it s about 750MB. Casey iLP
                          Message 12 of 26 , May 15, 2008
                            Lammy,

                            I have the video but it's about 750MB.

                            Casey
                            iLP
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