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CMYK

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  • Lisa Davidson
    Hi, List, Is it possible to print color separations of photographs on a Vandercook? With transparent ink? I ve done inkjets on an Iris printer on Somerset
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 4 11:18 PM
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      Hi, List,

      Is it possible to print color separations of photographs on a
      Vandercook? With transparent ink? I've done inkjets on an Iris
      printer on Somerset Satin, and even though the printer's resolution
      probably exceeded that of the paper, they came out fine. It's
      probably different from a plate, though. Has anyone tried this?

      Thank you,

      Lisa
    • splitflexi
      ... CMYK? Umm,... yes, of course it s possible. And, yeah, I think a few folks have tried this... You might say such a job is a basic function of a press like
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 4 11:57 PM
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        Lisa Davidson wrote:

        > Hi, List,
        >
        > Is it possible to print color separations of photographs on a
        > Vandercook? With transparent ink? I've done inkjets on an Iris
        > printer on Somerset Satin, and even though the printer's resolution
        > probably exceeded that of the paper, they came out fine. It's
        > probably different from a plate, though. Has anyone tried this?
        >
        > Thank you,
        >
        > Lisa
        >

        CMYK? Umm,... yes, of course it's possible. And, yeah, I think a few
        folks have tried this...

        You might say such a job is a basic function of a press like a
        vandercook. Note the oft-cited linescreen frequency limits, though--
        your reproduction generally will be a low resolution one, or at least
        lower than some people's tolerance. I frequently do CMYK from
        photopolymer on my vandercook with anywhere from 65-100 lpi-- coarse,
        but it suits my projects.

        Just curious-- is this something you are interested in trying? Do you
        have a Vandercook, or some other kind of printing press? What sort of
        printing experience do you have? I'm asking because I've noticed your
        posts/questions cover a wide gamut of printing-related topics but I
        can't seem to ascertain exactly what it is you're trying to achieve.

        Duncan Dempster
        Honolulu, Hawaii
      • Lisa Davidson
        Hi, Duncan, Well, yes, if it s a proof press it ought to be able to proof -- but I didn t know how much into the color area it was designed to go. I know that
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 5 12:36 AM
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          Hi, Duncan,

          Well, yes, if it's a proof press it ought to be able to proof -- but
          I didn't know how much into the color area it was designed to go. I
          know that proofing was done, but proofing of what, I don't know. All
          I really know is that where I used to work, they had one, and they
          were a type house.

          Yes, I have been asking a lot of questions about various areas, and I
          just yesterday mailed away a check and soon will have a Vandercook
          Model 3. Basically because I'm afraid of sticking my hand into a
          platen press. And for other reasons, too, of course. Call me
          neurotic but long-lived, I hope.

          What does your work look like? What kind of paper surface are you
          printing on? the usual artist type 100% rag uncoated, I take it?

          As for what I'm trying to achieve -- if you can bear with me, these
          questions are the first stage of it. As for experience -- lots and
          lots of typesetting. If you gave me an enema of Franklin Gothic I
          could probably tell you what size it was.

          Lisa


          On Apr 4, 2008, at 11:57 PM, splitflexi wrote:

          > Lisa Davidson wrote:
          >
          > > Hi, List,
          > >
          > > Is it possible to print color separations of photographs on a
          > > Vandercook? With transparent ink? I've done inkjets on an Iris
          > > printer on Somerset Satin, and even though the printer's resolution
          > > probably exceeded that of the paper, they came out fine. It's
          > > probably different from a plate, though. Has anyone tried this?
          > >
          > > Thank you,
          > >
          > > Lisa
          > >
          >
          > CMYK? Umm,... yes, of course it's possible. And, yeah, I think a few
          > folks have tried this...
          >
          > You might say such a job is a basic function of a press like a
          > vandercook. Note the oft-cited linescreen frequency limits, though--
          > your reproduction generally will be a low resolution one, or at least
          > lower than some people's tolerance. I frequently do CMYK from
          > photopolymer on my vandercook with anywhere from 65-100 lpi-- coarse,
          > but it suits my projects.
          >
          > Just curious-- is this something you are interested in trying? Do you
          > have a Vandercook, or some other kind of printing press? What sort of
          > printing experience do you have? I'm asking because I've noticed your
          > posts/questions cover a wide gamut of printing-related topics but I
          > can't seem to ascertain exactly what it is you're trying to achieve.
          >
          > Duncan Dempster
          > Honolulu, Hawaii
          >
          >
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Lisa Davidson
          P.S., addendum to this question in the form of another question what is the lifetime of off-the-shelf letterpress ink colors? longer than Epson pigment inks,
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 5 12:45 AM
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            P.S., addendum to this question in the form of another question
            what is the lifetime of off-the-shelf letterpress ink colors?
            longer than Epson pigment inks, etc?
            All the time I see magazine pictures taped up in store windows, and
            everything has faded except the blue. This would tell me, (1)
            they're offset inks, and (2) probably dye based. (or are they?)
            The archival photo people have got me brainwashed at last.

            Lisa


            On Apr 4, 2008, at 11:57 PM, splitflexi wrote:

            > Lisa Davidson wrote:
            >
            > > Hi, List,
            > >
            > > Is it possible to print color separations of photographs on a
            > > Vandercook? With transparent ink? I've done inkjets on an Iris
            > > printer on Somerset Satin, and even though the printer's resolution
            > > probably exceeded that of the paper, they came out fine. It's
            > > probably different from a plate, though. Has anyone tried this?
            > >
            > > Thank you,
            > >
            > > Lisa
            > >
            >
            > CMYK? Umm,... yes, of course it's possible. And, yeah, I think a few
            > folks have tried this...
            >
            > You might say such a job is a basic function of a press like a
            > vandercook. Note the oft-cited linescreen frequency limits, though--
            > your reproduction generally will be a low resolution one, or at least
            > lower than some people's tolerance. I frequently do CMYK from
            > photopolymer on my vandercook with anywhere from 65-100 lpi-- coarse,
            > but it suits my projects.
            >
            > Just curious-- is this something you are interested in trying? Do you
            > have a Vandercook, or some other kind of printing press? What sort of
            > printing experience do you have? I'm asking because I've noticed your
            > posts/questions cover a wide gamut of printing-related topics but I
            > can't seem to ascertain exactly what it is you're trying to achieve.
            >
            > Duncan Dempster
            > Honolulu, Hawaii
            >
            >
            >



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Peter Fraterdeus
            Hi Lisa There s a lot of info on pigment permanence out there, but CMYK are not likely to be the permanent ones. The permanence of pigment based inks will
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 5 9:24 AM
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              Hi Lisa

              There's a lot of info on pigment permanence out there, but CMYK are not likely to be the permanent ones.
              The permanence of pigment based inks will generally be much greater than dye-based.
              Google will be very helpful with the particulars, I'm sure.

              Vandercook made numerous styles of proof presses, including IIRC four-color presses for proofing CMYK plates before printing. These are not the same as the typographic presses which are single color.
              It would certainly be possible to do CMYK prints on a single color press, one run at a time, but I wouldn't expect it to look ANYTHING like your Epson inkjet output! I'd expect that even on a perfect hard matte proofing sheet, it would be very difficult to hold the tight registration on a sheet over four impressions. Of course, as Duncan says, at 65lpi, you've got some fudge room.

              I'm sure also that the idea of a Franklin Gothic enema has never been visualized on this list before ;-)

              Ciao
              p


              At 12:45 AM -0700 5 04 08, Lisa Davidson wrote:
              >P.S., addendum to this question in the form of another question
              >what is the lifetime of off-the-shelf letterpress ink colors?
              >longer than Epson pigment inks, etc?
              >All the time I see magazine pictures taped up in store windows, and
              >everything has faded except the blue. This would tell me, (1)
              >they're offset inks, and (2) probably dye based. (or are they?)
              >The archival photo people have got me brainwashed at last.
              >
              >Lisa

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            • nagraph1
              Vandercooks were regularly used for color proofing, and the 2 and 4 color models were made specifically for that, but each color had its own plate. Plates were
              Message 6 of 6 , Apr 5 11:53 AM
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                Vandercooks were regularly used for color proofing, and the 2 and 4
                color models were made specifically for that, but each color had its
                own plate. Plates were typically in the 110-120 line for publication
                printing on coated stocks, but 133 line was not uncommon in
                letterpress. The Vandercook 30-26 was their last 4-color proof press
                and it was huge--16,000# and 26 feet long. There are still several of
                these around and one of the last active ones from the Washington Post
                newspaper is now in Iowa.

                Fritz

                --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Lisa Davidson
                <lisaxdavidson@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi, Duncan,
                >
                > Well, yes, if it's a proof press it ought to be able to proof --
                but
                > I didn't know how much into the color area it was designed to go.
                I
                > know that proofing was done, but proofing of what, I don't know.
                All
                > I really know is that where I used to work, they had one, and they
                > were a type house.
                >
                > Yes, I have been asking a lot of questions about various areas, and
                I
                > just yesterday mailed away a check and soon will have a Vandercook
                > Model 3. Basically because I'm afraid of sticking my hand into a
                > platen press. And for other reasons, too, of course. Call me
                > neurotic but long-lived, I hope.
                >
                > What does your work look like? What kind of paper surface are you
                > printing on? the usual artist type 100% rag uncoated, I take it?
                >
                > As for what I'm trying to achieve -- if you can bear with me,
                these
                > questions are the first stage of it. As for experience -- lots
                and
                > lots of typesetting. If you gave me an enema of Franklin Gothic I
                > could probably tell you what size it was.
                >
                > Lisa
                >
                >
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