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Re: Line Art Challenge

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  • Gerald Lange
    ... Katie The thread ran in and out from message 775 into the early 800s with a follow up or two. I believe what you are inquiring about was Mark Attwood s
    Message 1 of 10 , Oct 4, 2002
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      > A while back, there was a discussion on this list about scanning either
      > grayscale or color artwork and using Photoshop tools to turn the image into
      > really nice, clean line art. At least I think that was what we read about. I
      > can't seem to find those messages now. Can someone refresh my memory about
      > the technique involved?
      >

      ....

      > Katie Harper
      > Ars Brevis Press
      > Cincinnati, OH
      > 513-233-9588
      > http://www.arsbrevispress.com

      Katie

      The thread ran in and out from message 775 into the early 800s with a
      follow up or two.

      I believe what you are inquiring about was Mark Attwood's recipe for
      reworking color scans into line work. It works quite well in that
      regard but I have not had similar results with grayscales of line
      art. I've found the "unsharp" feature he discussed seems to
      "splinter" the line work if there is not enough tonal gradation to
      begin with. I've found a reverse procedure, slight application of
      blurring filters, works better in that regard.

      Gerald
    • Gerald Lange
      Katie A bit further comment on this: I don t trust in the notion that a high resolution scanner alone will do the job for you, the higher the better, etc., and
      Message 2 of 10 , Oct 4, 2002
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        Katie

        A bit further comment on this:

        I don't trust in the notion that a high resolution scanner alone will
        do the job for you, the higher the better, etc., and that's that.
        Certainly hi-rez will help but not if you rely solely on it. If you
        are going to print the image letterpress you have to get it to a
        state where it will replicate exactingly despite all the additional
        problems associated with presswork; ink gain, impression.

        This requires a bit of handwork; thinning the weighty strokes,
        rebuilding the thin strokes, incorporating ink traps (breaking
        curves, bracketing tight angles, etc), and when possible, the
        construction of inking supports and drains. If you do it right and
        enlarge the piece at all, it will look a bit odd. But the proof is in
        the printing. I find this to be a very intuitive process and relying on
        mathematics and exact pixel configuration isn't actually going to get
        you to where you need to be.

        Gerald
      • cmcgarr1957
        I use Photoshop to scan in images either b/w or grayscale. Then I use Adobe Streamline to turn it into line art. I ve been using Streamline for about 10 years
        Message 3 of 10 , Nov 1, 2002
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          I use Photoshop to scan in images either b/w or grayscale. Then I use Adobe
          Streamline to turn it into line art. I've been using Streamline for about 10 years
          and it's wonderful. If you need help with correct setting in Streamline please
          reply. Oh, when scanning in b/w art you must scan in at 1200 resolution to
          keep the integrity of the line, when it is turned into vector art the line remains
          smooth.

          Casey McGarr


          --- In PPLetterpress@y..., "Gerald Lange" <bieler@w...> wrote:
          > > A while back, there was a discussion on this list about scanning either
          > > grayscale or color artwork and using Photoshop tools to turn the image
          into
          > > really nice, clean line art. At least I think that was what we read about. I
          > > can't seem to find those messages now. Can someone refresh my
          memory about
          > > the technique involved?
          > >
          >
          > ....
          >
          > > Katie Harper
          > > Ars Brevis Press
          > > Cincinnati, OH
          > > 513-233-9588
          > > http://www.arsbrevispress.com
          >
          > Katie
          >
          > The thread ran in and out from message 775 into the early 800s with a
          > follow up or two.
          >
          > I believe what you are inquiring about was Mark Attwood's recipe for
          > reworking color scans into line work. It works quite well in that
          > regard but I have not had similar results with grayscales of line
          > art. I've found the "unsharp" feature he discussed seems to
          > "splinter" the line work if there is not enough tonal gradation to
          > begin with. I've found a reverse procedure, slight application of
          > blurring filters, works better in that regard.
          >
          > Gerald
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