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Re: Choosing a typeface

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  • nagraph1
    It is sometimes interesting to see what noted type designers used for their own personal work. W.A. Dwiggins for his private press used 5 sizes of Bulmer and
    Message 1 of 15 , Mar 5, 2008
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      It is sometimes interesting to see what noted type designers used for
      their own personal work. W.A. Dwiggins for his private press used 5
      sizes of Bulmer and his own 12 pt. Winchester. The later face was cut
      by Linotype as an experimental face and Dwiggins had 185 lbs of it cast
      as individual type from the Linotype matrices.

      Fritz

      --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Julie Larson <entdesign@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > For the record, I was being sarcastic about what I tend to see
      created using MS Publisher. Most often it is stuff that will make the
      eyes recoil in horror. Many people that use low end desktop publishing
      programs have no education or training in layout and don't seem to look
      at the whole of their design. This results in clashing elements and
      many examples of inappropriate typography. Color usage is also often
      horrid, at least to my taste.
      >
    • Richard Wilson
      Hey Gang, This topic has been debated since desktop publishing became affordable in the late 1980s. As a design educator, I have heard the pros and cons of the
      Message 2 of 15 , Mar 5, 2008
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        Hey Gang,
        This topic has been debated since desktop publishing became affordable in
        the late 1980s. As a design educator, I have heard the pros and cons of the
        trained vs untrained designer (obviously I lean towards the trained.) My
        feeling is that as letterpress continues to grow in popularity for
        practicing designers around the country, the quality of the design will
        improve.

        Occasionally, clients will use untrained designers to save some money, but
        they usually get what they pay for. In terms of books on type, I would
        recommend ³Typographic Design: Form and Communication² by Carter, Day &
        Meggs or ³Thinking with Type: A Critical Guide for Designers, Writers,
        Editors, & Students² (Design Briefs) by Ellen Lupton. We use both books for
        our intro classes.
        Ric



        On 3/5/08 4:20 PM, "Austin Jones" <austin@...> wrote:

        >
        >
        >
        >
        > The software package is a tool. It is no better than the person using it.
        >
        > I see this type of situation all the time. A person will buy the most
        > expensive printer, or software and expect it to be "plug & play". Plug it in
        > and work miracles. These people call me all the time. I bought the best I
        > could find. It doesn't do all these wornerful things. Why?.
        >
        > The problem is the nut at the keyboard not the printer or software.
        >
        > Austin Jones
        > prints by AJ
        > austin@... <mailto:austin%40printsbyaj.com>
        > http://printsbyaj.com
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: "Scott Rubel" <scott@... <mailto:scott%40invitesite.com> >
        > To: <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com <mailto:PPLetterpress%40yahoogroups.com> >
        > Sent: Wednesday, March 05, 2008 7:50 AM
        > Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Choosing a typeface
        >
        >> > People who use high-end graphics programs aren't by definition so hot,
        >> > either. If you don't have the eye for it, the most expensive tools will
        >> > either make no difference, or make things worse.
        >> >
        >> > --Scott
        >> >
        >> > Julie Larson wrote:
        >>> >> For the record, I was being sarcastic about what I tend to see created
        >>> >> using MS Publisher. Most often it is stuff that will make the eyes recoil
        >>> >> in horror. Many people that use low end desktop publishing programs have
        >>> >> no education or training in layout and don't seem to look at the whole of
        >>> >> their design. This results in clashing elements and many examples of
        >>> >> inappropriate typography. Color usage is also often horrid, at least to
        >>> >> my taste.
        >>> >>
        >
        >
        >


        Ric Wilson
        Assistant Professor of Art
        University of Missouri Columbia
        A126 Fine Arts Building
        Columbia, MO 65211-6090
        573.882.4076



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Austin Jones
        The software package is a tool. It is no better than the person using it. I see this type of situation all the time. A person will buy the most expensive
        Message 3 of 15 , Mar 5, 2008
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          The software package is a tool. It is no better than the person using it.

          I see this type of situation all the time. A person will buy the most
          expensive printer, or software and expect it to be "plug & play". Plug it in
          and work miracles. These people call me all the time. I bought the best I
          could find. It doesn't do all these wornerful things. Why?.

          The problem is the nut at the keyboard not the printer or software.

          Austin Jones
          prints by AJ
          austin@...
          http://printsbyaj.com
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Scott Rubel" <scott@...>
          To: <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Wednesday, March 05, 2008 7:50 AM
          Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Choosing a typeface


          > People who use high-end graphics programs aren't by definition so hot,
          > either. If you don't have the eye for it, the most expensive tools will
          > either make no difference, or make things worse.
          >
          > --Scott
          >
          > Julie Larson wrote:
          >> For the record, I was being sarcastic about what I tend to see created
          >> using MS Publisher. Most often it is stuff that will make the eyes recoil
          >> in horror. Many people that use low end desktop publishing programs have
          >> no education or training in layout and don't seem to look at the whole of
          >> their design. This results in clashing elements and many examples of
          >> inappropriate typography. Color usage is also often horrid, at least to
          >> my taste.
          >>
        • Peter Fraterdeus
          It ain t the camera, it s the eye behind it ;-) However, having said that, there s a BIG difference between setting digital type with a professional app like
          Message 4 of 15 , Mar 5, 2008
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            It ain't the camera, it's the eye behind it ;-)

            However, having said that, there's a BIG difference between setting
            digital type with a professional app like InDesign or Illustrator
            versus Publisher, et al.

            Fractional line and letterspacing for example, hanging punctuation,
            style sheet management, etc.

            All of these are useless unless one knows why they are there, of
            course, but even a great craftsman can be hobbled by lousy chisels.
            Er, how many metaphors have I mixed here anyway!?


            Peter Fraterdeus
            http://ExquisiteLetterpress.com
            http://dubuquebookarts.com


            On 5 Mar 2008, at 4:20 PM, Austin Jones wrote:

            > The software package is a tool. It is no better than the person
            > using it.
            >
            > I see this type of situation all the time. A person will buy the most
            > expensive printer, or software and expect it to be "plug & play".
            > Plug it in
            > and work miracles. These people call me all the time. I bought the
            > best I
            > could find. It doesn't do all these wornerful things. Why?.
            >
            > The problem is the nut at the keyboard not the printer or software.
            >
          • filmaker0012001
            Thanks for all the suggestions, I plan to start looking at some speciman books. ... the ... wrong
            Message 5 of 15 , Mar 12, 2008
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              Thanks for all the suggestions, I plan to start looking at some
              speciman books.



              --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "filmaker0012001" <fsmith01@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > I've read a couple of books on begining printing (letterpress) and
              the
              > authors usually make a point of saying how they often picked the
              wrong
              > typeface to begin with. I was wondering how other people choose a
              > typeface for their work, or if there is a book on such.
              >
              > Respectfully
              >
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