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Re: [PPLetterpress] Scanning for Katie

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  • Bryan Hutcheson
    Scanners fall in three main categories 1. Desktop scanners for the recipe collector 2. Desktop Scanner for the Professional, 3. Drum Scanners for the high-end
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 13, 2002
      Scanners fall in three main categories 1. Desktop scanners for the recipe
      collector 2. Desktop Scanner for the Professional, 3. Drum Scanners for the
      high-end color and detail critical work.

      Of the three types there are quality scanners for each level of work.

      Agfa, Microtek, and HP provide good quality scanners for the amateur and
      professional alike

      In choosing a scanner there are a few things to keep in mind. But primarily
      of interest will be what your final use of a scan is going to be. Will it be
      for web? Will it be for color laser out put? will it be for scanning line
      art? will you be outputting to polymer? Will you be printing 4-color offset?
      If you are primarily planning on printing for letterpress, one of the
      midrange scanners provided by the above companies should be more than
      adequate.

      Some even come with the ability to scan slides or chromes. My rule for
      scanning any type of transparency is it should always be scanned from a
      high- end drum scanner if you are going for any serious kind of enlargement
      or color-specific quality. Abd if at all possible oil mounting is the method
      of choice. Scanning chromes or slides on a flatbed should only be done FPO.
      I am sure there are some who would argue with this... With about 9 years
      pre-press and scanning/color-correction/retouching experience I have always
      followed this rule...never use a flatbed for final scanning of any
      transparency. Period!

      With that in mind...I have a $300 Microtek sitting here next to me. With the
      correct amount of time and preparation I am able to pull of some very good
      quality scans from reflective artwork. The scans are as good as the $900
      Microtek and the $1400 Agfa.

      If you know Photoshop as a production tool (Curves, Gamma, under coating,
      highlight, mid and shadow input settings and of course sharpening) you
      should be able to get really good scans off of any good desktop scanner.
      Never go for any of the scanners in the FREE to 199 price range unless you
      really know Photoshop as a production tool, and have the ability to fix
      garbage once it¹s digital.


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