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Re: [PPLetterpress] Letterpress printing on Epson papers

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  • typetom@aol.com
    In a message dated 1/7/2008, Bieler@att.net writes: ...problems running previously letterpress printed sheets through an ink jet. Something about ink
    Message 1 of 14 , Jan 7, 2008
      In a message dated 1/7/2008, Bieler@... writes:

      ...problems running previously letterpress printed sheets through an
      ink jet. Something about ink degradation? Not certain about this.


      A concern with using ink jet printing is that the normal inks are water
      soluble.

      I don't think there is a problem using ink jet after printing with
      letterpress or offset inks, but there is a real problem with using a laser printer :
      the heat of the laser printing process will melt rubber-based inks, and even
      oil-based inks unless they are completely dried. The result is that the
      letterpress ink then ghosts on the laser printer drum and on the paper. Van Son
      added driers to its soy-based inks, labeled them Mega Laser inks, offering them
      as an answer for printing letterhead stationery that might get put through a
      laser printer. Not a problem for printed stationery that is later run through
      an ink jet.


      Tom Parson
      Now It's Up To You Publications
      157 S. Logan, Denver CO 80209
      (303) 777-8951 home
      (720) 480-5358 cell phone




      **************Start the year off right. Easy ways to stay in shape.
      http://body.aol.com/fitness/winter-exercise?NCID=aolcmp00300000002489


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Julie Larson
      Although I have not tried to print letterpress on the Epson Watercolor stock, I have printed several hundred sheets of it through my Epson. It is thin for
      Message 2 of 14 , Jan 8, 2008
        Although I have not tried to print letterpress on the Epson Watercolor stock, I have printed several hundred sheets of it through my Epson. It is thin for watercolor paper. The printing side is white and the non-printing side is more a "natural", yellower hue. If you are going to fold the stock, I do not recommend it as it is brittle and will crack. I have the impression that Epson rolls the texture into the pre-coated sheet.

        I have not used the other Epson papers you ask about.

        I have a Photo 2000P which uses the pigmented ink and lets me print on a wide variety of stock. I have done several projects using regular Arches watercolor paper. The ink jet image is not as crisp, but is fine for certain artistic effects.

        If you would like a sample of the Epson watercolor stock, email me your address offline and I'll send you a sheet.

        ----- Original Message ----
        From: Barbara Hauser <BarbHauser@...>
        To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, January 7, 2008 11:18:46 PM
        Subject: [PPLetterpress] Letterpress printing on Epson papers

        I have a project in mind that involves combining inkjet and letterpress
        printing. I am considering the following papers:

        Epson Velvet Fine Art Paper
        Epson UltraSmooth Fine Art Paper
        Epson Watercolor Radiant White

        Has anyone had experience with any of these papers for letterpress
        printing?

        Thanks,
        Barbara




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Paul Romaine
        In the US there is a high-end archival paper from Crane called Museo Max suitable for printing high end archival inkjets if you re using permanent inks. For
        Message 3 of 14 , Jan 8, 2008
          In the US there is a high-end archival paper from Crane called Museo
          Max suitable for printing high end archival inkjets if you're using
          permanent inks. For double-sided printing you might try Museo Max II
          which is made specifically to print doublesided. Beautiful stuff...
          and costly.

          Paul
        • Peter Fraterdeus
          Hi Graham! Thanks so much for the compliment! Indeed, it s Perpetua ala OS X, through the photopolymer sieve. I think my plate was a wee bit over exposed.
          Message 4 of 14 , Jan 8, 2008
            Hi Graham!
            Thanks so much for the compliment!

            Indeed, it's "Perpetua" ala OS X, through the photopolymer sieve.
            I think my plate was a wee bit over exposed. However, my friend is (sadly for a photographer) suffering from glaucoma (though it's under control) and I think she actually prefers the look!

            I hope that Eric Gill will not mind too much
            :-)

            Of course, what I'm not sure of is whether I misread the original post.
            Most of the responses seem to be regarding printing stationery which will eventually be fed through a digital printer...

            All the best

            Peter


            At 7:12 AM +0000 8 01 08, Graham and Kathy wrote:
            >Oh, how very nice! Wind blown sand and cool type. Looks like Perpetua, but
            >not quite right, so what's the face?
            >
            >Graham Moss
            >Incline Press
            >36 Bow Street
            >Oldham OL1 1SJ England
            >http://www.inclinepress.com
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >On 8/1/08 06:11, "Peter Fraterdeus" <peterf@...> wrote:
            >
            >> I recently did a small calling card project using this for a
            >> photographer friend here:
            >>
            >> http://www.exquisiteletterpress.com/samples/P1020927mbeck.JPG/image_view_fulls
            >> creen
            >>
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >


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          • David Goodrich
            Barbara, The answer to your question may depend on what you are trying to do. If you are trying to print a real photograph via ink-jet plus letterpress text on
            Message 5 of 14 , Jan 8, 2008
              Barbara,
              The answer to your question may depend on what you are trying to do.
              If you are trying to print a real photograph via ink-jet plus letterpress
              text on the same page I think you are going to have problems. I have done
              Christmas cards using ink-jet prints and letterpress texts several times,
              but I have always printed them on separate suitable papers and tipped (fancy
              word for pasted) the pictures onto the cards. I have difficulty imagining a
              paper that would make good photographs and also look good for letterpress
              text. This why in old books the half tones were always on separate pages of
              coated stock.
              On the other hand if you are using the ink-jet to produce a background
              pattern of some kind and then overprinting by letterpress (which sounds like
              a fantastic idea!) I would think almost any printing paper could work.
              Just adjust the settings in your printer program for non-photographic paper.
              And experiment, experiment, experiment.
              Let us know what you come up with.
              David


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Barbara Hauser
              Hello David and everyone, Thanks so much for the advice so far. The research one must do just to choose paper is one of the many hidden costs in these
              Message 6 of 14 , Jan 9, 2008
                Hello David and everyone,

                Thanks so much for the advice so far. The research one must do just
                to choose paper is one of the many hidden costs in these projects.
                Luckily I enjoy it.

                David, my project is a broadside that includes a watercolor painting
                with letterpress-printed text added, though not superimposed onto the
                painting. I had the painting scanned professionally at ArtScans in
                Culver City, CA.

                I've had very good results with letterpress printing on Moab Entrada
                Rag Bright 300, so that's why I'm hopeful that printing onto photo
                paper has possibilities. But the stability of the colors hasn't been
                tested with the Epson inks, as it has for the Epson-recommended
                papers. The reason I limited my original inquiry to the three papers
                listed is that they, as well as one canvas finish paper, are the only
                fine art papers that are engineered to provide optimum results with
                the inks in my printer, which is an Epson R2400.

                Since my first post on the subject, I have contacted Epson and
                neither their representataive nor his supervisor could tell me
                anything about how the papers might work with letterpress printing
                using oil-based inks. Epson no longer sells sample packs, but the rep
                did say that some of their resellers might. I'll call a few today.
                The rep also referred me to two companies who he said made fine art
                papers that work with the inks in my printer: Hammermill and Eastern
                Data Paper. I left messages with both of them but they have not as
                yet returned my calls.

                I will look into all of the other papers that you all have so kindly
                suggested. Thanks again for your comments, and thanks especially to
                those who have generously offered to send me sample sheets. Peter F,
                that business card is stunning.

                Barbara


                --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "David Goodrich"
                <davidgoodrich@...> wrote:
                >
                > Barbara,
                > The answer to your question may depend on what you are trying to do.
                > If you are trying to print a real photograph via ink-jet plus
                letterpress
                > text on the same page I think you are going to have problems. I
                have done
                > Christmas cards using ink-jet prints and letterpress texts several
                times,
                > but I have always printed them on separate suitable papers and
                tipped (fancy
                > word for pasted) the pictures onto the cards. I have difficulty
                imagining a
                > paper that would make good photographs and also look good for
                letterpress
                > text. This why in old books the half tones were always on separate
                pages of
                > coated stock.
                > On the other hand if you are using the ink-jet to produce a
                background
                > pattern of some kind and then overprinting by letterpress (which
                sounds like
                > a fantastic idea!) I would think almost any printing paper could
                work.
                > Just adjust the settings in your printer program for non-
                photographic paper.
                > And experiment, experiment, experiment.
                > Let us know what you come up with.
                > David
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • autumnmichellefoote
                Hi Barbara, I can send you some papers that I have around. If you want to email me directly, autumnmichellefoote@mac.com and I can sen you some samples. I
                Message 7 of 14 , Jan 11, 2008
                  Hi Barbara,
                  I can send you some papers that I have around. If you want to email me directly,
                  autumnmichellefoote@... and I can sen you some samples. I know for sure I have
                  Epson watercolor but other than that I will have to take a look. Also, an experiment a
                  friend of mine did (back in college) to check the archival properties of paper and inks, was
                  to take a print and cut in half. Keep one half inside under good conditions, take the other
                  and tape it up in your car window. In the car you have the worst possible conditions, plus
                  it is constantly getting sunlight. After about a week you can check to see if there are any
                  changes. There is a a research website http://www.wilhelm-research.com/ they test
                  papers and ink, and are much more reliable than the actual manufactures. Great bit of
                  information for the ink jet printing geek! -me included
                  again best wishes with your project.
                  Michelle

                  --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Barbara Hauser" <BarbHauser@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hello David and everyone,
                  >
                  > Thanks so much for the advice so far. The research one must do just
                  > to choose paper is one of the many hidden costs in these projects.
                  > Luckily I enjoy it.
                  >
                  > David, my project is a broadside that includes a watercolor painting
                  > with letterpress-printed text added, though not superimposed onto the
                  > painting. I had the painting scanned professionally at ArtScans in
                  > Culver City, CA.
                  >
                  > I've had very good results with letterpress printing on Moab Entrada
                  > Rag Bright 300, so that's why I'm hopeful that printing onto photo
                  > paper has possibilities. But the stability of the colors hasn't been
                  > tested with the Epson inks, as it has for the Epson-recommended
                  > papers. The reason I limited my original inquiry to the three papers
                  > listed is that they, as well as one canvas finish paper, are the only
                  > fine art papers that are engineered to provide optimum results with
                  > the inks in my printer, which is an Epson R2400.
                  >
                  > Since my first post on the subject, I have contacted Epson and
                  > neither their representataive nor his supervisor could tell me
                  > anything about how the papers might work with letterpress printing
                  > using oil-based inks. Epson no longer sells sample packs, but the rep
                  > did say that some of their resellers might. I'll call a few today.
                  > The rep also referred me to two companies who he said made fine art
                  > papers that work with the inks in my printer: Hammermill and Eastern
                  > Data Paper. I left messages with both of them but they have not as
                  > yet returned my calls.
                  >
                  > I will look into all of the other papers that you all have so kindly
                  > suggested. Thanks again for your comments, and thanks especially to
                  > those who have generously offered to send me sample sheets. Peter F,
                  > that business card is stunning.
                  >
                  > Barbara
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "David Goodrich"
                  > <davidgoodrich@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Barbara,
                  > > The answer to your question may depend on what you are trying to do.
                  > > If you are trying to print a real photograph via ink-jet plus
                  > letterpress
                  > > text on the same page I think you are going to have problems. I
                  > have done
                  > > Christmas cards using ink-jet prints and letterpress texts several
                  > times,
                  > > but I have always printed them on separate suitable papers and
                  > tipped (fancy
                  > > word for pasted) the pictures onto the cards. I have difficulty
                  > imagining a
                  > > paper that would make good photographs and also look good for
                  > letterpress
                  > > text. This why in old books the half tones were always on separate
                  > pages of
                  > > coated stock.
                  > > On the other hand if you are using the ink-jet to produce a
                  > background
                  > > pattern of some kind and then overprinting by letterpress (which
                  > sounds like
                  > > a fantastic idea!) I would think almost any printing paper could
                  > work.
                  > > Just adjust the settings in your printer program for non-
                  > photographic paper.
                  > > And experiment, experiment, experiment.
                  > > Let us know what you come up with.
                  > > David
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  >
                • Barbara Hauser
                  Thanks so much, Michelle, for the kind offer to send me some sample paper. I will take you up on it if I can t get a comprehensive sample pack from an Epson
                  Message 8 of 14 , Jan 13, 2008
                    Thanks so much, Michelle, for the kind offer to send me some sample
                    paper. I will take you up on it if I can't get a comprehensive sample
                    pack from an Epson reseller.

                    I, too, have done some home tests of inkjet prints, and the results
                    have been sobering. Thanks for the reference to wilhelm-research.com.
                    That is an excellent site. I was especially interested to see that
                    using UV glass greatly lengthens color life, since I have always
                    sprung for UV glass when I've framed my watercolors.

                    This brings me to another discussion topic. How do printers frame
                    their broadsides? I suppose the prints would be mounted to the mat as
                    watercolors are, with the print hinged only at the top to allow for
                    expansion and contraction of the paper as ambient humidity changes.
                    And I suppose that using the UV glass is the best way to keep the ink
                    colors from fading. But letterpress-printed broadsides can have such
                    breathtaking texture that putting them under glass would seem to spoil
                    the effect. I would think that they could be floated with no glass,
                    but then there's the fading and dust problems, and the question of how
                    to affix the broadside to the backing. Any thoughts?

                    Barbara
                    ________________________

                    >
                    > Hi Barbara,
                    > I can send you some papers that I have around. If you want to email
                    me directly,
                    > autumnmichellefoote@... and I can sen you some samples. I know for
                    sure I have
                    > Epson watercolor but other than that I will have to take a look.
                    Also, an experiment a
                    > friend of mine did (back in college) to check the archival
                    properties of paper and inks, was
                    > to take a print and cut in half. Keep one half inside under good
                    conditions, take the other
                    > and tape it up in your car window. In the car you have the worst
                    possible conditions, plus
                    > it is constantly getting sunlight. After about a week you can check
                    to see if there are any
                    > changes. There is a a research website
                    http://www.wilhelm-research.com/ they test
                    > papers and ink, and are much more reliable than the actual
                    manufactures. Great bit of
                    > information for the ink jet printing geek! -me included
                    > again best wishes with your project.
                    > Michelle
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