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Re: [PPLetterpress] Miehle Vertical Paper compatibility

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  • Scott Rubel
    I m glad Lance answered before I did. Without being so scientific about it, I would just answer, take your piece of paper and curled it up and, if it can curl
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 1, 2007
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      I'm glad Lance answered before I did. Without being so scientific
      about it, I would just answer, take your piece of paper and curled it
      up and, if it can curl into something like a nine inch diameter roll
      without cracking, and if it uncurls back into acceptable flatness for
      your purposes, then you can probably run it on a cylinder. So, you
      cannot describe the application purely in terms of thicknessā€¦it's
      also stiffness, which I don't know how to put a number to. Getting
      the grain right is good advice, but you don't always have control of
      grain when you're being economical and getting the most pieces out of
      a parent sheet.

      --Scott

      On Dec 1, 2007, at 12:12 PM, Lance Williams wrote:

      > Lisa,
      >
      > From my personal experience, I have run paper as light as 16# bond
      > up to
      > .023" chipboard, but the heavier stocks do require that the grain
      > of the
      > paper be parallel to the cylinder to allow the paper to curl around
      > the
      > cylinder on impression. I have spent most of my printing career
      > printing
      > on commodity grades of paper, but I have run papers like Neenah Cover
      > (110#) and Crane's Lettra (110#) on our V-50's many times... And, of
      > course, the .023" chipboard was a special project, and I don't know
      > if I
      > would want to do it again, but I do know it can be done, at least..
      >
      > - Lance Williams
      > Williams Stationery Co.
      > Camden, New York
      > APA #785
      >
      >
      >> [Original Message]
      >> From: Lisa Davidson <lisaxdavidson@...>
      >>
      >> Hi, Scott,
      >>
      >> Can you tell me off-hand in gsm, etc., the outer and inner limits of
      >> Miehle paper compatibility -- how thick is too thick, etc.? or just
      >> brands of paper that work or don't work in it?
      >>
      >> Thank you,
      >>
      >> Lisa
      >>
      >>
      >> On Nov 30, 2007, at 6:37 PM, Scott Rubel wrote:
      >>
      >>> Miehle is a really solid press and looks scary at first, but, like
      >>> anything, you can do it once you learn and it will keep on going
      >>> without a hitch.
      >>>
      >>> Remember, though, that it uses a cylinder. My got rid of my V36
      >>> because I was doing more and more work on very thick paper and extra
      >>> thin paper. The thick paper cannot flex around the cylinder and the
      >>> tissue thin paper can actually distort, even with a light
      >>> impression,
      >>> on any cylinder press. Best to print these on a flat bed.
      >>>
      >>> Everyone has given good advice on the C&P. You can assume any flat
      >>> bed press you get, if it has never been re-adjusted, will be
      >>> parallel
      >>> at the expected impression depth. Adjustment is easy in principal,
      >>> but can be frustrating to get it just right. At first you will
      >>> overestimate how much you need to turn each nut. It helps to have a
      >>> friend with you so to turn the wheel for each test so you never have
      >>> to put down the wrench.
      >>>
      >>> Keep asking questions. You have an admirable deficiency of
      >>> trepidation.
      >>>
      >>> --Scott
      >>>
      >>> On Nov 30, 2007, at 10:07 AM, Lisa Davidson wrote:
      >>>
      >>>>
      >>>> Hi, Ph.D.,
      >>>>
      >>>> I forgot -- I also inquired about Miehle verticals and platinum
      >>>> printing. I have been messing around with Pt for at least four or
      >>>> five years, reading, experimenting, etc., and thought she had
      >>>> something I didn't know about. But Miehle is something else.
      >>>>
      >>>> Lisa
      >>>>
      >>>> On Nov 30, 2007, at 6:54 AM, Ph. D. wrote:
      >>>>
      >>>>> lisaxdavidson skribis:
      >>>>>>
      >>>>>> Hi everyone -- I've never used a C&P, but
      >>>>>> someone told me that since the two platen halves
      >>>>>> are not strictly parallel (closer at the hinge), there
      >>>>>> is some way that you have to make up for this in
      >>>>>> makeready. How do you do it?
      >>>>>
      >>>>> C&P presses have adjusting bolts below the platen
      >>>>> to make it parallel when touching the type. The
      >>>>> table-top Pilot press is hinged, so if you're printing
      >>>>> really thick stock, you may need to adjust the bolts.
      >>>>> The floor model C&P presses have a platen which
      >>>>> rotates as it moves toward the type, so it stays
      >>>>> parallel through a much greater range of stock
      >>>>> thicknesses. Once the platen is adjusted to be
      >>>>> parallel, you should not need to adjust it again.
      >>>>>
      >>>>> You've asked about getting a Ludlow, a Heidelberg,
      >>>>> and other equipment. It might be helpful to tell us
      >>>>> exactly what experience in letterpress you have.
      >>>>> What equipment do you own? What have you used?
      >>>>> Have you taken any letterpress classes? Have you
      >>>>> read any letterpress instruction books?
      >>>>>
      >>>>> (Note that the "half" where the paper goes is called
      >>>>> the platen. The "half" where the type goes is called
      >>>>> the bed.")
      >>>>>
      >>>>> --Ph. D.
      >>>>>
      >>>>>
      >>>>>
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
    • Lisa Davidson
      Thank you both -- sounds very good. And, plus, you don t have to make an ICC profile for it. I still can t get used to the idea -- such luxury, just to pick
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 1, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Thank you both -- sounds very good. And, plus, you don't have to
        make an ICC profile for it. I still can't get used to the idea --
        such luxury, just to pick it up and stick it in a press. obviously
        there are other things to do, but at least they're not on a
        computer . . . .

        On Dec 1, 2007, at 1:06 PM, Scott Rubel wrote:

        > I'm glad Lance answered before I did. Without being so scientific
        > about it, I would just answer, take your piece of paper and curled it
        > up and, if it can curl into something like a nine inch diameter roll
        > without cracking, and if it uncurls back into acceptable flatness for
        > your purposes, then you can probably run it on a cylinder. So, you
        > cannot describe the application purely in terms of thicknessā€¦it's
        > also stiffness, which I don't know how to put a number to. Getting
        > the grain right is good advice, but you don't always have control of
        > grain when you're being economical and getting the most pieces out of
        > a parent sheet.
        >
        > --Scott
        >
        > On Dec 1, 2007, at 12:12 PM, Lance Williams wrote:
        >
        >> Lisa,
        >>
        >> From my personal experience, I have run paper as light as 16# bond
        >> up to
        >> .023" chipboard, but the heavier stocks do require that the grain
        >> of the
        >> paper be parallel to the cylinder to allow the paper to curl around
        >> the
        >> cylinder on impression. I have spent most of my printing career
        >> printing
        >> on commodity grades of paper, but I have run papers like Neenah Cover
        >> (110#) and Crane's Lettra (110#) on our V-50's many times... And, of
        >> course, the .023" chipboard was a special project, and I don't know
        >> if I
        >> would want to do it again, but I do know it can be done, at least..
        >>
        >> - Lance Williams
        >> Williams Stationery Co.
        >> Camden, New York
        >> APA #785
        >>
        >>
        >>> [Original Message]
        >>> From: Lisa Davidson <lisaxdavidson@...>
        >>>
        >>> Hi, Scott,
        >>>
        >>> Can you tell me off-hand in gsm, etc., the outer and inner limits of
        >>> Miehle paper compatibility -- how thick is too thick, etc.? or just
        >>> brands of paper that work or don't work in it?
        >>>
        >>> Thank you,
        >>>
        >>> Lisa
        >>>
        >>>
        >>> On Nov 30, 2007, at 6:37 PM, Scott Rubel wrote:
        >>>
        >>>> Miehle is a really solid press and looks scary at first, but, like
        >>>> anything, you can do it once you learn and it will keep on going
        >>>> without a hitch.
        >>>>
        >>>> Remember, though, that it uses a cylinder. My got rid of my V36
        >>>> because I was doing more and more work on very thick paper and
        >>>> extra
        >>>> thin paper. The thick paper cannot flex around the cylinder and the
        >>>> tissue thin paper can actually distort, even with a light
        >>>> impression,
        >>>> on any cylinder press. Best to print these on a flat bed.
        >>>>
        >>>> Everyone has given good advice on the C&P. You can assume any flat
        >>>> bed press you get, if it has never been re-adjusted, will be
        >>>> parallel
        >>>> at the expected impression depth. Adjustment is easy in principal,
        >>>> but can be frustrating to get it just right. At first you will
        >>>> overestimate how much you need to turn each nut. It helps to have a
        >>>> friend with you so to turn the wheel for each test so you never
        >>>> have
        >>>> to put down the wrench.
        >>>>
        >>>> Keep asking questions. You have an admirable deficiency of
        >>>> trepidation.
        >>>>
        >>>> --Scott
        >>>>
        >>>> On Nov 30, 2007, at 10:07 AM, Lisa Davidson wrote:
        >>>>
        >>>>>
        >>>>> Hi, Ph.D.,
        >>>>>
        >>>>> I forgot -- I also inquired about Miehle verticals and platinum
        >>>>> printing. I have been messing around with Pt for at least four or
        >>>>> five years, reading, experimenting, etc., and thought she had
        >>>>> something I didn't know about. But Miehle is something else.
        >>>>>
        >>>>> Lisa
        >>>>>
        >>>>> On Nov 30, 2007, at 6:54 AM, Ph. D. wrote:
        >>>>>
        >>>>>> lisaxdavidson skribis:
        >>>>>>>
        >>>>>>> Hi everyone -- I've never used a C&P, but
        >>>>>>> someone told me that since the two platen halves
        >>>>>>> are not strictly parallel (closer at the hinge), there
        >>>>>>> is some way that you have to make up for this in
        >>>>>>> makeready. How do you do it?
        >>>>>>
        >>>>>> C&P presses have adjusting bolts below the platen
        >>>>>> to make it parallel when touching the type. The
        >>>>>> table-top Pilot press is hinged, so if you're printing
        >>>>>> really thick stock, you may need to adjust the bolts.
        >>>>>> The floor model C&P presses have a platen which
        >>>>>> rotates as it moves toward the type, so it stays
        >>>>>> parallel through a much greater range of stock
        >>>>>> thicknesses. Once the platen is adjusted to be
        >>>>>> parallel, you should not need to adjust it again.
        >>>>>>
        >>>>>> You've asked about getting a Ludlow, a Heidelberg,
        >>>>>> and other equipment. It might be helpful to tell us
        >>>>>> exactly what experience in letterpress you have.
        >>>>>> What equipment do you own? What have you used?
        >>>>>> Have you taken any letterpress classes? Have you
        >>>>>> read any letterpress instruction books?
        >>>>>>
        >>>>>> (Note that the "half" where the paper goes is called
        >>>>>> the platen. The "half" where the type goes is called
        >>>>>> the bed.")
        >>>>>>
        >>>>>> --Ph. D.
        >>>>>>
        >>>>>>
        >>>>>>
        >>
        >>
        >> Yahoo! Groups Links
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
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