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Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Attaching a Motor to an Old Style C&P with a "Clutch" mechanism

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  • rpolinski@nac.net
    Yes, I hadn t realised you were completely familair with it. That sounds like a really nice system; I don t think I ve ever seen one like it. I wouldn t mind
    Message 1 of 26 , Nov 30, 2007
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      Yes, I hadn't realised you were completely familair with it. That sounds
      like a really nice system; I don't think I've ever seen one like it. I
      wouldn't mind having one myself!

      Rich



      > Hi Rich,
      >
      > Thank you for your concern for my safety, but I don't
      > think I made myself clear...this clutch arrangement
      > was designed precisely as a variable speed control for
      > these presses.
      >
      > I have used it for almost 40 years now without any
      > problems, and plan on continuing to do so for many,
      > many more without any fears or safety concerns.
      >
      > As I said before, it's absolutely ingenious and works
      > ever so smoothly. The "wooden shoes" gently engage the
      > motor and put less strain on the motor than other
      > systems would that have a motor pully connected to a
      > fixed. The clutch system gently engages the motor
      > torque to the drive shaft instead of jolting it with
      > an "all of a sudden" and immediate transfer of power
      > like other pulley set ups do.
      >
      > Once the flywheel is going, the amount of energy to
      > keep it going is pretty minimal...so the "clutch"
      > simply gives it little"nudges" when it's already
      > spinning, so there's not much friction involved... and
      > certainly not enough to ever catch fire!
      >
      > So no, there is no danger of "friction fires" or any
      > other calamities, and I fully intend to keep using it.
      > I'm sure it will be working long after all the rest of
      > the "direct drive" systems on other presses have
      > burned out. :-)
      >
      > Maybe some day I'll have to make a YouTube movie of it
      > and let everyone see what is somewhat difficult to
      > describe in text, no matter what font I'm using!
      >
      > Best wishes,
      >
      > --Steve
      >
      > Steve Robison
      > The Robison Press
      > Belmont, CA (just south of San Francisco)
      >
      >
      > --- rpolinski@... wrote:
      >
      >> Unless I'm badly mistaken that's a clutch and not a
      >> speed control. I'm
      >> sure it affects the speed but at the cost of burning
      >> out the motor and
      >> possibly setting the wooden shoes on fire from
      >> friction. I'd really be
      >> certain about that before I continued to use it as a
      >> speed control.
      >>
      >> Rich
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> > Hello everyone...
      >> >
      >> > My 10x15 C&P Oldstyle came with a "clutch"
      >> mechanism
      >> > on the right hand side that variably controls
      >> speed.
      >> >
      >> > The motor runs at a constant RPM with a belt
      >> connected
      >> > to about a 12" diameter wheel on the drive shaft
      >> > similar to most drive set-ups.
      >> >
      >> > The difference is that this right hand side wheel
      >> has
      >> > two interlocking parts to it and has a couple of
      >> > wooden shoes in it. When a lever is moved, the
      >> wooden
      >> > shoes get pressed against the inside of this wheel
      >> and
      >> > slightly rub against the inside of the wheel until
      >> the
      >> > power is slowly transferred to the drive shaft.
      >> This
      >> > allows for a completely variable speed control
      >> from a
      >> > crawl to high speed and everything in-between.
      >> >
      >> > It's an absolute joy to operate because I can slow
      >> it
      >> > way down for difficult to feed jobs, and speed it
      >> way
      >> > up for easy fast runs. I think it's mechanically
      >> > ingenious and wonder why I haven't seen more
      >> presses
      >> > equipped this way.
      >> >
      >> > The press came that way when I salvaged it from an
      >> > empty lot next to a defunct letterpress shop back
      >> in
      >> > the early 70's.
      >> >
      >> > Maybe it was a mechanism used in conjunction with
      >> > centralized pulley drives from overhead in large
      >> shops
      >> > with steam driven power shafts. But my press has a
      >> cam
      >> > in the drive shaft to indicate that it was
      >> originally
      >> > treadle operated and later converted to motor
      >> power,
      >> > so I don't know...unless they offered the press in
      >> > either configuration from the factory and didn't
      >> > bother to have straight shafts in them. But the
      >> > "clutch" mechanism looks like original equipment
      >> that
      >> > was designed for this type of press, or maybe as a
      >> > factory add-on option offered by Chandler and
      >> Price
      >> > maybe before variable speed motors were popular or
      >> > available.
      >> >
      >> > Anyway, does anyone else have a set-up like this
      >> or
      >> > know of it's origins? I'd be curious to know...
      >> >
      >> > Best wishes,
      >> >
      >> > --Steve
      >> >
      >> > Steve Robison
      >> > The Robison Press
      >> > Belmont, CA (about 25 miles south of San
      >> Francisco)
      >> >
      >> > Steve Robison
      >> > robisonsteve@...
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >>
      > ____________________________________________________________________________________
      >> > Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your home page.
      >> > http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs
      >> >
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> Yahoo! Groups Links
      >>
      >>
      >> mailto:PPLetterpress-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >
      >
      > Steve Robison
      > robisonsteve@...
      >
      >
      > ____________________________________________________________________________________
      > Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your home page.
      > http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs
      >
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