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Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Imagesetter advice

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  • Lisa Davidson
    Hi, Jacob, Don t forgot the Epson option. It sounds stupid, but it works very well. I have an Epson 7600 with Photo-Dye ink (the cheaper, evanescent kind).
    Message 1 of 40 , Nov 14, 2007
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      Hi, Jacob,

      Don't forgot the Epson option. It sounds stupid, but it works very
      well. I have an Epson 7600 with Photo-Dye ink (the cheaper,
      evanescent kind). They sold me a Wasatch RIP to go with it, and
      although I am using it for something else, it does seem to print
      excellent halftones with all kinds of different dot shapes. The
      density goes to at least 3.5 and probably 4.0. I'm not sure how many
      UV exposures this ink can handle before it begins to fade, but you
      probably don't need many if you're only using it to burn plates. The
      great thing about this (even though you do have to pay for ink and
      film) is that you don't ever have to clean a processor.

      Lisa
      /


      On Nov 13, 2007, at 5:31 PM, Jacob Groth wrote:

      > Hi Grover and Others,
      >
      > Thank you very much for this thorough response and for sharing your
      > opinion. I spent some time online looking at the website for ECRM
      > and was trying to find dealers, but I got stuck in some kind of
      > infinite loop that kept returning me to the same list of vendors.
      > But, I'll keep trying ..
      >
      > As for the kind of stuff I'm printing (text & basic line art - no
      > halftones or color seps), what DPI and LPI should I be looking for?
      > I don't think registration is all that important since I won't be
      > making any color seperations. I'm not too concerned about
      > processing speed or medium size since I'm not doing large quantities.
      >
      > Finally, I've found a AGFA ProSet 9800 Imagesetter and 9000 PS Star
      > Plus Rip for sale for only $1000. It is listed in "excellent"
      > condition. It seems like too good of a deal. But, if it's for real,
      > is this imagesetter good enough for my purpose?
      >
      > Thanks for all your help!
      >
      > Jacob Groth
      > ================
      > "Good afternoon Jacob. Actually, you weren't too far off when
      > referring to black-and-white vs. color imagesetters. There is a
      > difference but the difference is the level of quality required to
      > output process separations versus line film. There are
      > different types of imagesetters, i.e. capstan, etc. The differences
      > concern the tolerances for registration as well as the DPI. For your
      > needs, a lower end or simple ECRM brand imagesetter would fit the
      > bill. Luckily for you, printers like myself are transitioning away
      > from film in droves so plenty of used and refurbished machines are
      > available. You would want to couple it with a Harlequin RIP as it's a
      > really fine one and can be used with modules to drive other devices
      > such as large format inkjets, etc. ECRM is a good choice because they
      > are still in business unlike so many of the other manufacturers, and
      > they sell used and refurbished machines direct. Otherwise you'll have
      > to go through a graphic arts dealer. The only issue that's sticky is
      > maintenance.You must make sure that whoever you purchase a machine
      > from can handle repairs. These are sophisticated machines with
      > powerful lasers that require real precision when fixing. No monkeys
      > needed. You can find ECRM on the web, they're in Tewksbury,
      > Massachusetts, I believe. Let me know if you need any further info,
      > i.e. processors, film sources, etc.
      > Best regards, Grover Gatewood, Iron Horse Graphics, Ltd."
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Lisa Davidson
      Hi, Autumn, Can I ask you something about your Pt/Pd prints? I ve just changed my method of doing the enlarged digital negatives, and wish I d done it years
      Message 40 of 40 , Nov 27, 2007
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        Hi, Autumn,

        Can I ask you something about your Pt/Pd prints? I've just changed
        my method of doing the enlarged digital negatives, and wish I'd done
        it years ago. Do you not like Pictorico OHP much? If you have any
        time to talk about it, that is.

        Thank you,

        Lisa


        On Nov 27, 2007, at 5:24 PM, Autumn Michelle Foote wrote:

        > It's actually called High Gloss Film and Pictorico
        > makes a much better one. I have used it for contact
        > printing (photography) onto traditional B&W paper.
        > Pictorico also makes a OHP which is a clear film you
        > can run through an inkjet printer. I use this for
        > contact printing platinum/palladium prints. The high
        > gloss film is better for quality.
        > Michelle
        > --- Lisa Davidson <lisaxdavidson@...> wrote:
        >
        > >
        > > Actually, I shouldn't call it plastic paper, but
        > > plastic "media," as
        > > they mis-say it now. I keep ranting about how the
        > > singular is medium
        > > and the plural is media, even to the extent of
        > > editing an article in
        > > Wikipedia, but I don't know how far I've gotten into
        > > the general
        > > consciousness.
        > >
        > > Lisa
        > >
        > >
        > > On Nov 15, 2007, at 8:22 AM, Lisa Davidson wrote:
        > >
        > > >
        > > > Hi, Jacob,
        > > >
        > > > Yes, I was thinking this too. If you print with an
        > > Epson on their
        > > > completely smooth-surfaced plastic paper, you
        > > could shoot that on
        > > > film and get pretty hi res.
        > > >
        > > > Lisa
        > > >
        > > > On Nov 14, 2007, at 10:49 PM, ductormanpaperboy
        > > wrote:
        > > >
        > > > > Hey Jacob
        > > > >
        > > > > You could also look for an old process camera
        > > and shoot your negs.
        > > > > This
        > > > > is another ball of wax altogether but all you
        > > need is a camera that
        > > > > works, instructions on how to use it, a pair of
        > > gloves, and two
        > > > > processing trays one for developer and one for
        > > fix. These cameras
        > > > are
        > > > > made for line art mainly, but you can shoot
        > > halftones if you pick up
        > > > > special screens.
        > > > >
        > > > > Good luck
        > > > >
        > > > > Ian
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been
        > > removed]
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been
        > > removed]
        > >
        > >
        >
        > __________________________________________________________
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        >
        >
        >



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